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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 15. Getting to Know The Gibbs Energy.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 15. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Getting to Know The Gibbs Energy -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on May 7, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:02:42 Entropy in Isolated and Unisolated Systems 0:06:09 Enthalpy and Internal Energy for a Spontaneous Process 0:07:20 Helmholtz Energy 0:09:57 Parr Bomb 0:11:16 Gibbs Energy 0:24:40 Gibbs-Helmholtz Equation 0:30:19 Standard Molar Gibbs Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 16. The Chemical Potential.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 16. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The Chemical Potential -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on May 9, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:02:50 Energy Relations with Different Constants 0:04:49 Direction of Spontaneous Change 0:06:28 G and Temperature 0:08:28 The Third Law of Thermodyanimcs 0:10:32 Gibbs-Helmholtz Equation 0:29:33 Partial Molar Gibbs Energy 0:42:34 Gibbs-Duhem Equation Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 17. Finding Equilibrium

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 17. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Finding Equilibrium -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on May 9, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:00:58 Free Energy of an Individual Species 0:07:16 Chemical Potential 0:10:18 Why is G Bowed? 0:24:58 Three Types of Reactions Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 04. Entropy.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 04. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Entropy -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 9, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:04:17 Boltzmann Distribution Law 0:15:37 Three Types of Ensembles 0:31:55 S = k ln W Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 01. Syllabus, Homework, & Lectures.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 01. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Syllabus, Homework, & Lectures -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 11, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:25:58 Quantum Mechanics Timeline 0:31:26 James Clark Maxwell 0:32:25 Ludwig Boltzmann 0:33:23 Willard Gibbs 0:35:35 Statistical Mechanics 0:37:54 The Free Energy of Ammonia 0:43:30 Microstate Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 02. The Boltzmann Distribution Law.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 02. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The Boltzmann Distribution Law -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 4, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:04:17 The Boltzmann Distribution Law 0:07:44 Notation for Specifying a Particular Configuration 0:14:41 The Number of Microstates 0:20:27 Configuration VI 0:29:48 Which Configuration is Preferred? 0:33:28 Number of Microstates Before and After 0:37:25 The Boltzmann Distribution Law 0:43:07 Molecular Partition Function 0:52:33 How Much Thermal Energy is in the System? Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 05. The Equipartition Theorum.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 05. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The Equipartition Theorum -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 11, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:02:34 In Real Molecules... 0:05:51 Constant Volume Heat Capacity 0:11:37 The Equipartition Theorem 0:39:40 The Translational Energy of a Classical Gas Molecules Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 06. The Rotational Partition Function.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 06. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The Rotational Partition Function -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 13, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:02:51 Monoatomic Gas in One Dimension 0:11:51 Manifold of Rotational State 0:19:43 What's a Symmetry Number? Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 07. Vibrational Partition Functions.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 07. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Vibrational Partition Functions -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 16, 2013. Index of Topics: 0:00:41 The Symmetry Number 0:07:09 Aluminum Chloride Atoms 0:13:03 Example: Benzene 0:15:43 Rotational Partition Function of HCl 0:19:12 Rotational Partition Function of Methane 0:22:02 Vibrational States 0:33:24 What About Vibrational Energy? 0:36:13 Vibrational Modes Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 08. The First Law.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 08. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The First Law -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 18, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:00:58 Chlorine Dioxide 0:09:40 Thermodynamics 0:11:39 Energy 0:15:30 Three Flavors of Systems 0:18:15 Closed Systems 0:20:23 Work 0:36:52 Reversible Processes 0:44:37 Sign Convention 0:46:27 Heat Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics. Lec 9. The First Law (review) & Adiabatic Processes Part II

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 09. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- The First Law (review) & Adiabatic Processes Part II -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 23, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:01:16 Internal Energy 0:04:30 Heat 0:06:01 Enthalpy 0:16:47 Adiabatic Processes Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C. Lecture 10. Jim Joule.

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UCI Chem 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Spring 2012) Lec 10. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics -- Jim Joule -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html Instructor: Reginald Penner, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In Chemistry 131C, students will study how to calculate macroscopic chemical properties of systems. This course will build on the microscopic understanding (Chemical Physics) to reinforce and expand your understanding of the basic thermo-chemistry concepts from General Chemistry (Physical Chemistry.) We then go on to study how chemical reaction rates are measured and calculated from molecular properties. Topics covered include: Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials; Chemical equilibrium; and Chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics (Chem 131C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/openchem/ This video is part of a 27-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Reginald M. Penner. Recorded on April 23, 2012. Index of Topics: 0:04:13 Adiabatic Processes 0:18:24 Equivalence of Work and Heat 0:22:58 Joule's Other Experiment 0:28:43 The Compressibility Factor 0:31:00 Thought Experiment 0:36:40 The Joule-Thompson Effect 0:45:13 Isenthalps 0:47:13 The Linde Refrigerator Required attribution: Penner, Reginald Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics 131C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131c_thermodynamics_and_chemical_dynamics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Chemistry 202. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II. Lecture 06. The Organic Chemistry of Phosphorus

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UCI Chem 202 Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Winter 2014) Lec 06. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- The Organic Chemistry of Phosphorus View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Topics include more in-depth treatment of mechanistic concepts, kinetics, conformational analysis, computational methods, stereoelectronics, and both solution and enzymatic catalysis. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Chem 202) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html These videos are part of a 23-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms II" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded on January 17, 2014. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 202 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Chemistry 202. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II. Lecture 07. Phosphorus Chemistry

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UCI Chem 202 Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Winter 2014) Lec 07. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- Phosphorus Chemistry View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Topics include more in-depth treatment of mechanistic concepts, kinetics, conformational analysis, computational methods, stereoelectronics, and both solution and enzymatic catalysis. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Chem 202) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html These videos are part of a 23-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms II" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded on January 22, 2014. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 202 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Chemistry 202. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II. Lecture 08. The Organic Chemistry of Sulfur

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UCI Chem 202 Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Winter 2014) Lec 08. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- The Organic Chemistry of Sulfur View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Topics include more in-depth treatment of mechanistic concepts, kinetics, conformational analysis, computational methods, stereoelectronics, and both solution and enzymatic catalysis. Organic Reaction Mechanisms II (Chem 202) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html These videos are part of a 23-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms II" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded on January 24, 2014. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 202 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_202_organic_reaction_mechanisms_ii.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Organic Chemistry II

Description

This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. The student will focus on the four most important classes of reactions: electrophilic substitution at aromatic rings, nucleophilic addition at carbonyl compounds, hydrolysis of carboxylic acids, and carbon-carbon bond formation using enolates. This course also introduces biological molecules, including carbohydrates, peptides and proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, from a molecular perspective. The student will learn how chemical reactions involving these molecules, especially oxidation and reduction reactions, form the basis of all life. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 104; See also: Biology 108)

Subjects

organic chemistry | ethers | epoxides | thiols | sulfides | dienes | benzene | aromatic | amines | aldehydes | ketones | carboxylic acids | esters | amides | anydrides | acyl halides | enols | enolates | carbohydrates | lipids | amino acids | nucleic acids | spectroscopy | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Description

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is designed to provide the knowledge to explain everyday phenomena of inorganic complexes. The student will study the various aspects of their physical and chemical properties and learn how to determine the practical applications that these complexes can have in industrial, analytical, and medicinal chemistry. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 202)

Subjects

inorganic chemistry | symmetry | molecular orbital theory | transition methods | valence | crystal | ligand | spectra | transition metal | spectroscopy | organometallics | oxidation | reduction | d-metal complexes | catalysis | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Quantum Chemistry Virtual Lab

Description

Measuring the Balmer series of lines for the Hydrogen atom. Watch this next video to carry out the lab exercise.

Subjects

University of Manchester | Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences | School of Chemistry | physical chemistry | Quantum Chemistry | virtual lab | virtual experiment | Physical Sciences

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Quantum Chemistry Virtual Lab

Description

Measuring the Balmer series of lines for the Hydrogen atom. Watch this next video to carry out the lab exercise.

Subjects

University of Manchester | Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences | School of Chemistry | physical chemistry | Quantum Chemistry | virtual lab | virtual experiment | Physical Sciences

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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Kinetics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals primarily with equilibrium properties of macroscopic systems, basic thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium of reactions in gas and solution phase, and rates of chemical reactions.AcknowledgementsThe material for 5.60 has evolved over a period of many years, and therefore several faculty members have contributed to the development of the course contents. The following are known to have assisted in preparing the lecture notes available on OCW:Emeritus Professors of Chemistry: Robert A. Alberty, Carl W. Garland, Irwin Oppenheim, John S. Waugh.Professors of Chemistry: Moungi Bawendi, John M. Deutch, Robert W. Field, Robert G. Griffin, Keith A. Nelson, Robert J. Silbey, Jeffrey I. Steinfeld.Professor of Bioengineering and Computer Science: Bruce Tidor.Professor of Chemistry, Ri

Subjects

thermodynamics | kinetics | equilibrium | macroscopic systems | state variables | law of thermodynamics | entropy | Gibbs function | reaction rates | clapeyron | enthalpy | clausius | adiabatic | Hemholtz | catalysis | oscillators | autocatalysis | carnot cycle

License

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5.S16 Advanced Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar will be a scientific exploration of the food we eat and enjoy. Each week we shall have a scientific edible experiment that will explore a specific food topic. This will be a hands-on seminar with mandatory attendance of at least 85%. Topics include, but are not limited to, what makes a good experiment, cheese making, joys of tofu, food biochemistry, the science of spice, what is taste? This course is the second in a series of two courses in kitchen chemistry. The prerequisite to Advanced Kitchen Chemistry is ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry, which is also on OCW.

Subjects

food | edible | hands-on | cooking | chemistry | cook | kitchen | tofu | cake | muffin | cheese | marinade | ice cream | liquid nitrogen

License

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5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques (MIT) 5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised by Dr. J. Haseltine, Dr. Kevin M. Shea, and Dr. Sarah A. Tabacco. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials a This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised by Dr. J. Haseltine, Dr. Kevin M. Shea, and Dr. Sarah A. Tabacco. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials a

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | purification | purification | transfer and extraction | transfer and extraction | column chromatography | column chromatography | protein assays | protein assays | error analysis | error analysis | NMR | NMR | IR | IR | gas chromatography | gas chromatography | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | experimental chemistry | experimental chemistry | original research projects | original research projects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT) 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices. This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices.

Subjects

solid state chemistry; electronic structure; chemical bonding; crystal structure; atomic and molecular arrangements; crystalline and amorphous solids | solid state chemistry; electronic structure; chemical bonding; crystal structure; atomic and molecular arrangements; crystalline and amorphous solids | solid state chemistry | solid state chemistry | electronic structure | electronic structure | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | crystal structure | crystal structure | atomic and molecular arrangements | atomic and molecular arrangements | crystalline and amorphous solids | crystalline and amorphous solids

License

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5.04 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry II (MIT) 5.04 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

This course provides a systematic presentation of the chemical applications of group theory with emphasis on the formal development of the subject and its applications to the physical methods of inorganic chemical compounds. The electronic structure of molecules will be developed. Against this backdrop, the optical, vibrational, and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes are presented and their investigation by the appropriate spectroscopy is described. This course provides a systematic presentation of the chemical applications of group theory with emphasis on the formal development of the subject and its applications to the physical methods of inorganic chemical compounds. The electronic structure of molecules will be developed. Against this backdrop, the optical, vibrational, and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes are presented and their investigation by the appropriate spectroscopy is described.

Subjects

inorganic chemistry | inorganic chemistry | group theory | group theory | transition metal complexes | transition metal complexes | symmetry element | symmetry element | point group | point group | LCAO | LCAO | metal metal bonding | metal metal bonding | vibrational spectroscopy | vibrational spectroscopy | character tables | character tables | sandwich compounds | sandwich compounds

License

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5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT) 5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

5.13 is an intermediate organic chemistry course that deals primarily with synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry are included to illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems, medicine, and in the chemical industry. 5.13 is an intermediate organic chemistry course that deals primarily with synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry are included to illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems, medicine, and in the chemical industry.

Subjects

intermediate organic chemistry | intermediate organic chemistry | organic | organic | organic molecules | organic molecules | stereochemistry | stereochemistry | reaction mechanisms | reaction mechanisms | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis | synthesis | structure determination | structure determination | mechanism | mechanism | structure | structure | reactivity | reactivity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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