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Kinetics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals primarily with equilibrium properties of macroscopic systems, basic thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium of reactions in gas and solution phase, and rates of chemical reactions.AcknowledgementsThe material for 5.60 has evolved over a period of many years, and therefore several faculty members have contributed to the development of the course contents. The following are known to have assisted in preparing the lecture notes available on OCW:Emeritus Professors of Chemistry: Robert A. Alberty, Carl W. Garland, Irwin Oppenheim, John S. Waugh.Professors of Chemistry: Moungi Bawendi, John M. Deutch, Robert W. Field, Robert G. Griffin, Keith A. Nelson, Robert J. Silbey, Jeffrey I. Steinfeld.Professor of Bioengineering and Computer Science: Bruce Tidor.Professor of Chem

Subjects

thermodynamics | kinetics | equilibrium | macroscopic systems | state variables | law of thermodynamics | entropy | Gibbs function | reaction rates

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1.76 Aquatic Chemistry (MIT) 1.76 Aquatic Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants. This course is offered through The MIT/WHOI Joint Program. The MIT/WHOI Joint Program is one of the premier marine science graduate programs in the world. It draws on the complementary strengths and approaches of two great institutions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) an This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants. This course is offered through The MIT/WHOI Joint Program. The MIT/WHOI Joint Program is one of the premier marine science graduate programs in the world. It draws on the complementary strengths and approaches of two great institutions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) an

Subjects

water | water | aquatic | aquatic | seawater | seawater | carbonate | carbonate | trace metals | trace metals | woods hole | woods hole | acid-base | acid-base | complexation | complexation | precipitation-dissolution | precipitation-dissolution | reduction-oxidation | reduction-oxidation | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | equilibrium composition | equilibrium composition | approximation techniques | approximation techniques

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12.759 Marine Chemistry Seminar (MIT)

Description

The structure of the course is designed to have students acquire a broad understanding of the field of Marine Chemistry; to get a feel for experimental methodologies, the results that they have generated and the theoretical insights they have yielded to date.

Subjects

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10.571J Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 10.571J Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including experience with computer codes. It is intended for undergraduates and first year graduate students. This course provides an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including experience with computer codes. It is intended for undergraduates and first year graduate students.

Subjects

physics of the atmosphere | physics of the atmosphere | chemistry of the atmosphere | chemistry of the atmosphere | computer codes | computer codes | Aerosols | Aerosols | Gas | Gas | aerosol transport | aerosol transport | radiation | radiation | emissions | emissions | Emissions control technology | Emissions control technology | air pollution and climate | air pollution and climate

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5.61 Physical Chemistry (MIT) 5.61 Physical Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course presents an introduction to quantum mechanics. It begins with an examination of the historical development of quantum theory, properties of particles and waves, wave mechanics and applications to simple systems—the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor and the hydrogen atom. The lectures continue with a discussion of atomic structure and the Periodic Table. The final lectures cover applications to chemical bonding including valence bond and molecular orbital theory, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Acknowledgements The material for 5.61 has evolved over a period of many years, and, accordingly, several faculty members have contributed to the development of the course contents. The original version of the lecture notes that are available on OCW This course presents an introduction to quantum mechanics. It begins with an examination of the historical development of quantum theory, properties of particles and waves, wave mechanics and applications to simple systems—the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor and the hydrogen atom. The lectures continue with a discussion of atomic structure and the Periodic Table. The final lectures cover applications to chemical bonding including valence bond and molecular orbital theory, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Acknowledgements The material for 5.61 has evolved over a period of many years, and, accordingly, several faculty members have contributed to the development of the course contents. The original version of the lecture notes that are available on OCW

Subjects

quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | quantum chemistry | quantum chemistry | particles and waves | particles and waves | wave mechanics | wave mechanics | atomic structure | atomic structure | valence orbital | valence orbital | molecular orbital theory | molecular orbital theory | molecular structure | molecular structure | photochemistry | photochemistry | tunneling | tunneling | spherical harmonics | spherical harmonics | rigid rotor | rigid rotor | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | oscillators | oscillators | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | NMR | NMR | hartree-fock | hartree-fock | LCAO | LCAO

License

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3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT) 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices. This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices.

Subjects

solid state chemistry; electronic structure; chemical bonding; crystal structure; atomic and molecular arrangements; crystalline and amorphous solids | solid state chemistry; electronic structure; chemical bonding; crystal structure; atomic and molecular arrangements; crystalline and amorphous solids | solid state chemistry | solid state chemistry | electronic structure | electronic structure | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | crystal structure | crystal structure | atomic and molecular arrangements | atomic and molecular arrangements | crystalline and amorphous solids | crystalline and amorphous solids

License

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12.301 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 12.301 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history; methods for detecting climate change, including proxies, ice cores, instrumental records, and time series analysis; physical and chemical processes in climate, including primordial atmosphere, ozone chemistry, carbon and oxygen cycles, and heat and water budgets; internal feedback mechanisms, including ice, aerosols, water vapor, clouds, and ocean circulation; climate forcing, including orbital variations, volcanism, plate tectonics, and solar variability; climate models and mechanisms of variability, including energy balance, coupled models, and global ocean and atmosphere models; and outstanding problems. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history; methods for detecting climate change, including proxies, ice cores, instrumental records, and time series analysis; physical and chemical processes in climate, including primordial atmosphere, ozone chemistry, carbon and oxygen cycles, and heat and water budgets; internal feedback mechanisms, including ice, aerosols, water vapor, clouds, and ocean circulation; climate forcing, including orbital variations, volcanism, plate tectonics, and solar variability; climate models and mechanisms of variability, including energy balance, coupled models, and global ocean and atmosphere models; and outstanding problems.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

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Discovery of a Lifetime: F. Sherwood Rowland and the Ozone Layer

Description

The Libraries announced the opening of a significant new exhibit, "Discovery of a Lifetime: F. Sherwood Rowland and the Ozone Layer" on Friday, November 18, 2011 in Langson Library. The exhibit celebrates the research contributions of world-renowned atmospheric scientist F. Sherwood "Sherry" Rowland, 1995 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry, and UCI Donald Bren Research Professor of Chemistry in Earth System Science. This special evening with F. Sherwood Rowland featured a talk by Ralph J. Cicerone, President of the National Academy of Sciences and Chancellor Emeritus, UC Irvine, along with special remarks by current UC Irvine Chancellor Michael V. Drake, M.D.

Subjects

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Test kits for water analysis Test kits for water analysis

Description

This free course, Test kits for water analysis, steps outside the laboratory to look at some examples of analytical procedures being carried out in the field using commercial test kits. These quick tests provide results on-site, extending the options available to analysts. The methods used are chemical or microbiological in nature, made portable by microelectronics. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Test kits for water analysis. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Test kits for water analysis, steps outside the laboratory to look at some examples of analytical procedures being carried out in the field using commercial test kits. These quick tests provide results on-site, extending the options available to analysts. The methods used are chemical or microbiological in nature, made portable by microelectronics. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Test kits for water analysis. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Chemistry | Chemistry | S230_1 | S230_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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SP.235 Chemistry of Sports (MIT) SP.235 Chemistry of Sports (MIT)

Description

This seminar will focus on three sports: swimming, cycling and running. There will be two components to the seminar: classroom sessions and a "laboratory" in the form of a structured training program. The classroom component will introduce the students to the chemistry of their own biological system. With swimming, running and cycling as sample sports, students are encouraged to apply their knowledge to complete a triathlon shortly after the term. This seminar will focus on three sports: swimming, cycling and running. There will be two components to the seminar: classroom sessions and a "laboratory" in the form of a structured training program. The classroom component will introduce the students to the chemistry of their own biological system. With swimming, running and cycling as sample sports, students are encouraged to apply their knowledge to complete a triathlon shortly after the term.

Subjects

cardiovascular | cardiovascular | muscles | muscles | training | training | fitness; nutrition | fitness; nutrition | fueling | fueling | injury | injury | sports medicine | sports medicine | overuse injury | overuse injury | swimming | swimming | running | running | cycling | cycling | bicycle | bicycle | bike | bike | shoes | shoes | running shoes | running shoes | lactate | lactate | lactic acid | lactic acid | wetsuit | wetsuit | lycra | lycra | spandex | spandex | wind tunnel | wind tunnel | sports drinks | sports drinks | caffeine | caffeine | alcohol | alcohol | exercise | exercise | competition | competition | endurance | endurance | strength | strength | EPO | EPO | erythropoietin | erythropoietin | scandals | scandals | tapering | tapering | triathlon | triathlon | sports | sports | race | race | steroid | steroid | midfoot running | midfoot running | forefoot running | forefoot running

License

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12.744 Marine Isotope Chemistry (MIT) 12.744 Marine Isotope Chemistry (MIT)

Description

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of principles of marine isotope geochemistry, its systematics, and its application to the study of the behavior and history of the oceans within the earth system. The emphasis is on developing the underlying concepts and theory as well as proficiency in working with practical isotope systems. The course is divided into four sections: nuclear systematics, Earth formation and evolution, stable isotopes, and applications to the ocean system. The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of principles of marine isotope geochemistry, its systematics, and its application to the study of the behavior and history of the oceans within the earth system. The emphasis is on developing the underlying concepts and theory as well as proficiency in working with practical isotope systems. The course is divided into four sections: nuclear systematics, Earth formation and evolution, stable isotopes, and applications to the ocean system.

Subjects

oceanography | oceanography | chemical oceanography | chemical oceanography | isotope geochemistry | isotope geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemistry | marine science | marine science | isotopes | isotopes | radiocarbon | radiocarbon | radioactive decay | radioactive decay | radiometric dating | radiometric dating | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | isotope fractionation | isotope fractionation | fractionation | fractionation | water column | water column | whoi | whoi | woods hole | woods hole | earth science | earth science | atmosphere | atmosphere | ocean | ocean

License

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5.76 Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure (MIT) 5.76 Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to illustrate how molecular structure is extracted from a spectrum. In order to achieve this goal it will be necessary to: master the language of spectroscopists; develop facility with quantum mechanical models; predict the relative intensities and selection rules; and learn how to assign spectra. The goal of this course is to illustrate how molecular structure is extracted from a spectrum. In order to achieve this goal it will be necessary to: master the language of spectroscopists; develop facility with quantum mechanical models; predict the relative intensities and selection rules; and learn how to assign spectra.

Subjects

Chemistry | Chemistry | molecular spectra | molecular spectra | molecular structure | molecular structure | spectroscopists | spectroscopists | quantum mechanical models | quantum mechanical models | intensities | intensities | selection rules | selection rules | energy levels | energy levels | vibrations | vibrations

License

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Environmental engineering Environmental engineering

Description

The presentation has been made available through our website and demonstrated at a variety of events where School Teachers meet eg 14-19 Conference ( School of Education) and PGCE Science Mentor Meetings ( School of Education). The presentation has been made available through our website and demonstrated at a variety of events where School Teachers meet eg 14-19 Conference ( School of Education) and PGCE Science Mentor Meetings ( School of Education). The Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering has concerns about the lack of knowledge amongst school pupils, and their teachers, of the type of work undertaken by an Environmental Engineer. The interactive presentation was developed as part of an awareness raising exercise for aspects of Environmental Engineering. Targeted at KS3 pupils particularly in Year 9 (Y9) the themes of air/ soil/water pollution were chosen because of their links to the KS3 National Curriculum for Science ( eg unit 9g Environmental Chemistry). The rationale behind the presentation was that visually it must be engaging and provide a clear indication of the consequences of actions but at the same time have questions using appropriate language that provide a basis for extending discussion / teachin The Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering has concerns about the lack of knowledge amongst school pupils, and their teachers, of the type of work undertaken by an Environmental Engineer. The interactive presentation was developed as part of an awareness raising exercise for aspects of Environmental Engineering. Targeted at KS3 pupils particularly in Year 9 (Y9) the themes of air/ soil/water pollution were chosen because of their links to the KS3 National Curriculum for Science ( eg unit 9g Environmental Chemistry). The rationale behind the presentation was that visually it must be engaging and provide a clear indication of the consequences of actions but at the same time have questions using appropriate language that provide a basis for extending discussion / teachin

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Chem 201. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I. Lecture 20. Phosphorus Chemistry

Description

UCI Chem 201 Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Fall 2012) Lec 20. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- Phosphorus Chemistry View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Advanced treatment of basic mechanistic principles of modern organic chemistry. Topics include molecular orbital theory, orbital symmetry control of organic reactions, aromaticity, carbonium ion chemistry, free radical chemistry, the chemistry of carbenes and carbanions, photochemistry, electrophilic substitutions, aromatic chemistry. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Chem 201) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 20-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms I" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded December 7, 2012. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 201 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

Subjects

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology). This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | climate change | climate change | marine records | marine records | ice core records | ice core records | continental records | continental records | paleoceanographic data | paleoceanographic data | statistics | statistics | factor analysis | factor analysis | time series analysis | time series analysis | simple climatology | simple climatology | geochemical changes | geochemical changes | mineralogical changes | mineralogical changes | glacial cycles | glacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | earth-surface environment | earth-surface environment | environmental history | environmental history | Oxygen Isotope | Oxygen Isotope | Coral Reefs | Coral Reefs | Paleoceanography | Paleoceanography | Paleoclimatology | Paleoclimatology | Paleothermometry | Paleothermometry | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Ocean Chemistry | Ocean Chemistry | Salinity | Salinity

License

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5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques (MIT) 5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques (MIT)

Description

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised by Dr. J. Haseltine, Dr. Kevin M. Shea, Dr. Sarah A. Tabacco, Dr. Kimberly L. Berkowski, Anne M. (Gorham) Rachupka, and Dr. Joh This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised by Dr. J. Haseltine, Dr. Kevin M. Shea, Dr. Sarah A. Tabacco, Dr. Kimberly L. Berkowski, Anne M. (Gorham) Rachupka, and Dr. Joh

Subjects

chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | purification | purification | transfer and extraction | transfer and extraction | column chromatography | column chromatography | protein assays | protein assays | error analysis | error analysis | NMR | NMR | IR | IR | gas chromatography | gas chromatography | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | UV-Vis | UV-Vis

License

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ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

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12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT) 12.002 Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure. This course introduces the structure, composition, and physical processes governing the terrestrial planets, including their formation and basic orbital properties. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquakes, seismic waves, rheology, impact cratering, gravity and magnetic fields, heat flux, thermal structure, mantle convection, deep interiors, planetary magnetism, and core dynamics. Suitable for majors and non-majors seeking general background in geophysics and planetary structure.

Subjects

Terrestrial Planets | Terrestrial Planets | Disk Accretion | Disk Accretion | Planetary Formation | Planetary Formation | Geochronology | Geochronology | Solar System | Solar System | Elastic stress and strain | Elastic stress and strain | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismic Waves and wave equation | Seismology | Seismology | Heat | Heat | Diffusion | Diffusion | Geomagnetism | Geomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Paleomagnetism | Plate Tectonics | Plate Tectonics | Topography | Topography | Isostasy | Isostasy | Gravity Anomalies | Gravity Anomalies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT) 12.842 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements. This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history. It is offered to both undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements.

Subjects

climate | climate | climate change | climate change | proxies | proxies | ice cores | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | heat and water budgets | aerosols | aerosols | water vapor | water vapor | clouds | clouds | ocean circulation | ocean circulation | orbital variations | orbital variations | volcanism | volcanism | plate tectonics | plate tectonics | solar system | solar system | solar variability | solar variability | climate model | climate model | energy balance | energy balance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Symposium for Solution Chemistry, Perspectives of Solution Chemistry,Present and Future

Description

Subjects

License

Copyright 2012, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT) 12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology). This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | ice cores | corals | corals | Micropaleontological | Micropaleontological | isotopic | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | atmospheric chemistry | climate | climate | ocean temperature | ocean temperature | circulation | circulation | chemistry | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | orbital forcing | climate change | climate change | marine records | marine records | ice core records | ice core records | continental records | continental records | paleoceanographic data | paleoceanographic data | statistics | statistics | factor analysis | factor analysis | time series analysis | time series analysis | simple climatology | simple climatology | geochemical changes | geochemical changes | mineralogical changes | mineralogical changes | glacial cycles | glacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | intergalacial cycles | earth-surface environment | earth-surface environment | environmental history | environmental history | Oxygen Isotope | Oxygen Isotope | Coral Reefs | Coral Reefs | Paleoceanography | Paleoceanography | Paleoclimatology | Paleoclimatology | Paleothermometry | Paleothermometry | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide | Ocean Chemistry | Ocean Chemistry | Salinity | Salinity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.091SC Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Solid State Chemistry is a first-year single-semester college course on the principles of chemistry. This unique and popular course satisfies MIT's general chemistry degree requirement, with an emphasis on solid-state materials and their application to engineering systems.

Subjects

solid state chemistry | atomic structure | atomic bonding | crystal structure | crystalline solid | periodic table | electron shell | x-ray spectroscopy | amorphous solid | reaction kinetics | aqueous solution | solid solution | biomaterial | polymer | semiconductor | phase diagram | material processing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.091SC Introduction to Solid State Chemistry (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Solid State Chemistry is a first-year single-semester college course on the principles of chemistry. This unique and popular course satisfies MIT's general chemistry degree requirement, with an emphasis on solid-state materials and their application to engineering systems.

Subjects

solid state chemistry | atomic structure | atomic bonding | crystal structure | crystalline solid | periodic table | electron shell | x-ray spectroscopy | amorphous solid | reaction kinetics | aqueous solution | solid solution | biomaterial | polymer | semiconductor | phase diagram | material processing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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General Chemistry I

Description

This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Subjects

chemistry | chemical | matter | metric system | significant figures | atom | mass | isotope | spectroscopy | periodic table | vsepr theory | oxidation | stoichiometry | thermodynamics | entropy | enthalpy | hess's law | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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General Chemistry II

Description

This second-semester course will cover several of the tools needed to study chemistry at a more advanced level. We will identify the factors that affect the speed of a reaction, learn how an atom bomb works on a chemical level, and discover how chemistry powers a light bulb, and conclude with a discussion of organic chemistry, a topic that is as important to biology as it is to chemistry. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 102; See also: Biology 106)

Subjects

chemistry | chemical | equilibrium | le chatelier's principle | solubility | electrochemistry | radioactivity | nuclear chemistry | organic chemistry | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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