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A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.1] A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.1]

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ebook version of A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.1] ebook version of A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.1]

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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The memoirs of the Countess of Berci. Taken from the French by the author of the Female Quixote. In two volumes.: [pt.2]Histoire trage-comique de nostre temps, sous les noms de Lysandre et de Caliste. English The memoirs of the Countess of Berci. Taken from the French by the author of the Female Quixote. In two volumes.: [pt.2]Histoire trage-comique de nostre temps, sous les noms de Lysandre et de Caliste. English

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ebook version of The memoirs of the Countess of Berci. Taken from the French by the author of the Female Quixote. In two volumes.: [pt.2]Histoire trage-comique de nostre temps, sous les noms de Lysandre et de Caliste. English ebook version of The memoirs of the Countess of Berci. Taken from the French by the author of the Female Quixote. In two volumes.: [pt.2]Histoire trage-comique de nostre temps, sous les noms de Lysandre et de Caliste. English

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.4] A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.4]

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ebook version of A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.4] ebook version of A complete history of the English stage: ... by Mr. Dibdin. ... [pt.4]

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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21F.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | second | language | ESL | listening | comprehension | oral | skills | pronunciation | common expressions | gambits | idioms | formal | informal | contexts

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT) 6.911 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI (MIT)

Description

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation. This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

Subjects

ToBI system | ToBI system | Tones and Break Indices | Tones and Break Indices | prosodic structure | prosodic structure | spoken utterances | spoken utterances | American English | American English | ToBI tutorial | ToBI tutorial | labelling | labelling | sample utterances | sample utterances | linguistics | linguistics | phonology | phonology | phonetics | phonetics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | speech acoustics or music | speech acoustics or music | prosody of speech | prosody of speech | intonation | intonation | rhythm | rhythm | grouping | grouping | prosodic differences | prosodic differences | phonetic implementation | phonetic implementation

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse. This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse.

Subjects

sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | love poetry or amatory verse | love poetry or amatory verse | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | sonnet | sonnet | Petrarch | Petrarch | Elizabethan England | Elizabethan England | metaphysical poets | metaphysical poets | Donne and Marvell | Donne and Marvell

License

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

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21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007J After Columbus (MIT) 21L.007J After Columbus (MIT)

Description

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres

Subjects

21L.007 | 21L.007 | 21G.020 | 21G.020 | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north | america | north | america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report | north america | north america | New World | New World | America | America | Native Americans | Native Americans | English | English | Europeans | Europeans | North America | North America | literary transformations | literary transformations | nation | nation | captivity narratives | captivity narratives | Michel Montaigne | Michel Montaigne | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Jean de L?ry | Jean de L?ry | Daniel Defoe | Daniel Defoe | Mary Rowlandson | Mary Rowlandson | Derek Walcott | Derek Walcott | J. M. Coetzee | J. M. Coetzee | Christopher Columbus | Christopher Columbus | 21F.020J | 21F.020J | 21F.020 | 21F.020

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | Mary Wroth | sound | sound | rhythm | rhythm | figuration | figuration | poetry | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | uses of love poetry | seduction | seduction | fame | fame | morals | morals | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | conduct manuals | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | narrative poems | pornographic poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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An Introduction to Old English (slides)

Description

Topics include who the Anglo-Saxons were, where they came from, and where they settled; the rough period covered in Old English; differences and similarities between Old English and Modern English; the use of runes and more.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | Q310 | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | Q310

License

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Old English Language (slides)

Description

Topics include how Old English works, and what makes it different from Modern English; where Old English comes from and how it relates to other languages; pronunciation, inflection, dialects and more.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | #greatwriters | Q310 | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | #greatwriters | Q310

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Cristian Aliaga: Your Virtues Are Your Faults. Poetry Reading (Spanish and English)

Description

A reading by Cristian Aliaga, one of Argentina's outstanding contemporary poets, given at St. John's College, Oxford, on 3 November, 2011. English translations are read by Ben Bollig, Lecturer in Spanish American Literature. The Argentine poet Cristian Aliaga reads his poetry to an audience at St. John's College, Oxford, on 3 November 2011. Aliaga is one of Argentina's outstanding contemporary poets, with more than a dozen collections of poems to his name. His work has recently been published in a bilingual Spanish-English edition by Manchester Spanish and Portuguese Studies (New Series). The English translations were read by Ben Bollig, Fellow of St. Catherine's College and Lecturer in Spanish American Literature. Includes an introduction to Aliaga's poetry, with an extract fro Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

argentina | #greatwriters | poetry | Aliaga | argentina | #greatwriters | poetry | Aliaga

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Distance learning material Distance learning material

Description

The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to specialise in, depending upon their own particular interests. At present, 100 Students from a range of diverse backgrounds in numerous locations throughout the world are registered on these courses. Students use these materials as starting points to their study, and then interaction with tutors and fellow students is maintained via email, discussion boards and chat rooms. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to specialise in, depending upon their own particular interests. At present, 100 Students from a range of diverse backgrounds in numerous locations throughout the world are registered on these courses. Students use these materials as starting points to their study, and then interaction with tutors and fellow students is maintained via email, discussion boards and chat rooms. The materials provided are taken from three postgraduate modules which students study as part of the School's distance learning MA degree programmes in 'Literary Linguistics', 'Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching' and 'Modern English Language'. Our courses generally consist of 10 units which cover the key areas of study within particular disciplines, in conjunction with material documenting the latest developments within each field. The 'Descriptive Linguistic Analysis' units are taken from the compulsory foundational module, enabling students to gain the core knowledge that they will need throughout their programme. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to speciali The materials provided are taken from three postgraduate modules which students study as part of the School's distance learning MA degree programmes in 'Literary Linguistics', 'Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching' and 'Modern English Language'. Our courses generally consist of 10 units which cover the key areas of study within particular disciplines, in conjunction with material documenting the latest developments within each field. The 'Descriptive Linguistic Analysis' units are taken from the compulsory foundational module, enabling students to gain the core knowledge that they will need throughout their programme. The 'Literary Linguistics' and 'Language and Gender' units are examples from modules that students chose to speciali

Subjects

UNow | UNow | U-now | U-now | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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English for Professional and Academic Communication: Curso de Adaptación English for Professional and Academic Communication: Curso de Adaptación

Description

This course has been designed to help students who have already obtained their Degree in Arquitectura Técnica (Quantity Surveying) improve their oral and written skills to use English in academic and professional environments as demanded by most companies worldwide. More particularly, course contents cover all four main skills, namely, listening, reading, writing and speaking with an emphasis placed on building construction core topics. This course has been designed to help students who have already obtained their Degree in Arquitectura Técnica (Quantity Surveying) improve their oral and written skills to use English in academic and professional environments as demanded by most companies worldwide. More particularly, course contents cover all four main skills, namely, listening, reading, writing and speaking with an emphasis placed on building construction core topics.

Subjects

Inglés para fines específicos | Inglés para fines específicos | Discurso oral y escrito | Discurso oral y escrito | Filología inglesa | Filología inglesa | Comunicación académico profesional | Comunicación académico profesional | Ingeniería de edificación | Ingeniería de edificación

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Popular fiction in World War I Popular fiction in World War I

Description

Presented by Dr Jane Potter, Senior Lecturer in Publishing at Oxford Brookes University, this video and audio podcast looks beyond the War Poets to the important role that books, publishers and the book trade played during the First World War … Continue reading → Presented by Dr Jane Potter, Senior Lecturer in Publishing at Oxford Brookes University, this video and audio podcast looks beyond the War Poets to the important role that books, publishers and the book trade played during the First World War … Continue reading →

Subjects

Material Culture | Material Culture | Teaching | Teaching | 070 (News media journalism publishing) | 070 (News media journalism publishing) | 820 (English literature) | 820 (English literature) | 821 (English poetry) | 821 (English poetry) | PN (Literature) | PN (Literature) | PN4699-5650 (Journalism) | PN4699-5650 (Journalism) | Podcast | Podcast

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Am I ready to study in English?

Description

Even if you feel confident using English in everyday situations, studying in English at higher education level might present extra challenges. This unit provides an opportunity for you to reflect on your English language skills through a series of academic exercises.

Subjects

study skills | academic english | english language | higher education | scotland | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Image from ?Before the Conquest; or, English worthies in the old English period. With illustrations by F. Barnard?, 000016986

Description

Image from ?Before the Conquest; or, English worthies in the old English period. With illustrations by F. Barnard?, 000016986 Author: Adams, W. H. Davenport (William Henry Davenport) Page: 153 Year: 1870 Place: Edinburgh Publisher: W. P. Nimmo Following the link above will take you to the British Library?s integrated catalogue. You will be able to download a PDF of the book this image is taken from, as well as view the pages up close with the 'itemViewer?. Click on the 'related items? to search for the electronic version of this work.

Subjects

bldigital | bl_labs | britishlibrary | 1870 | similar_to_70054665864_published_date | new_train_of_thought

License

http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

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English Language Teaching: History, Approaches and Methods (2012) English Language Teaching: History, Approaches and Methods (2012)

Description

This course aims to present a critical and analytical historical overview of the methods used in teaching foreign languages to young students and adults, especially as applied to English Language Teaching (ELT). While the study of concepts and general issues around teaching and learning will be brief until the 19th century, from this century onwards the main methods used will be analysed in more detail. The theoretical/informative presentation of methods addresses the theoretical and practical implications in the use of each method in ELT, and will always be accompanied by its practical application to real situations (audiovisual classes and / or written materials). This application will be made from the point of view of (i) teaching materials developed by each method, and (ii) their appli This course aims to present a critical and analytical historical overview of the methods used in teaching foreign languages to young students and adults, especially as applied to English Language Teaching (ELT). While the study of concepts and general issues around teaching and learning will be brief until the 19th century, from this century onwards the main methods used will be analysed in more detail. The theoretical/informative presentation of methods addresses the theoretical and practical implications in the use of each method in ELT, and will always be accompanied by its practical application to real situations (audiovisual classes and / or written materials). This application will be made from the point of view of (i) teaching materials developed by each method, and (ii) their appli

Subjects

Methods | Methods | a Inglesa | a Inglesa | Approaches | Approaches | Language teaching | Language teaching | ELT | ELT | History | History

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Service encounters : booking a holiday Service encounters : booking a holiday

Description

The listening module provides rich opportunities for students to improve their listening skills at their own pace, when they want to work, at their own level, and in any order they would like. The listening module provides rich opportunities for students to improve their listening skills at their own pace, when they want to work, at their own level, and in any order they would like. In this on-line lesson provided by 'CELE' international students can improve their social listening skills. This lesson is part of a module developing students' listening skills in academic, social and everyday situations. This lesson helps students understand how humour is used in conversation and how speakers cooperate and share knowledge in conversation. Students can improve their listening skills through tasks focusing on understanding the main points, listening for detail, and practising predicting strategies. Students can work on tasks to improve their listening skills to identify weak sounds in English (difficult to hear) such as prepositions, contractions and articles. In addition, students can look up definitions of words, explore how words are used in context (including w In this on-line lesson provided by 'CELE' international students can improve their social listening skills. This lesson is part of a module developing students' listening skills in academic, social and everyday situations. This lesson helps students understand how humour is used in conversation and how speakers cooperate and share knowledge in conversation. Students can improve their listening skills through tasks focusing on understanding the main points, listening for detail, and practising predicting strategies. Students can work on tasks to improve their listening skills to identify weak sounds in English (difficult to hear) such as prepositions, contractions and articles. In addition, students can look up definitions of words, explore how words are used in context (including w

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Spoken English | Spoken English | Listening skills | Listening skills | Self-paced learnign | Self-paced learnign | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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The sounds of German The sounds of German

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module investigates the sounds of German and how they can be described accurately (“phonetics and phonology”). Students will learn to transcribe German using the notation of the International Phonetic Association, and we will look in particular at aspects of German pronunciation that are hard to master because they are different to English or similar to French. We will also look at how foreign words (including English words) are integrated into the German sound system, and at regional variation in spoken German. Practical transcription skills will form a major part of coursework, including one of the two assignments. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1. D This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009. This module investigates the sounds of German and how they can be described accurately (“phonetics and phonology”). Students will learn to transcribe German using the notation of the International Phonetic Association, and we will look in particular at aspects of German pronunciation that are hard to master because they are different to English or similar to French. We will also look at how foreign words (including English words) are integrated into the German sound system, and at regional variation in spoken German. Practical transcription skills will form a major part of coursework, including one of the two assignments. Suitable for study at undergraduate level 1. D

Subjects

UNow | UNow | German language | German language | ukoer | ukoer | phonetics and phonology | phonetics and phonology | International Phonetic Association | International Phonetic Association | German pronunciation | German pronunciation | German sound system | German sound system | regional variation in spoken German | regional variation in spoken German | practical transcription skills | practical transcription skills

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Image from ?English Lyrics. A collection of English poetry of the present day. Arranged by ? R. H. Baynes?, 000236301

Description

Image from ?English Lyrics. A collection of English poetry of the present day. Arranged by ? R. H. Baynes?, 000236301 Author: Baynes, Robert Hall Page: 91 Year: 1865 Place: London Publisher: Houlston & Wright View all the images from this book Following the link above will take you to the British Library?s integrated catalogue. You will be able to download a PDF of the book this image is taken from, as well as view the pages up close with the 'itemViewer?. Click on the 'related items? to search for the electronic version of this work.

Subjects

bldigital | bl_labs | britishlibrary | 1865 | similar_to_78960338290_place_of_publishing | similar_to_78960338290_bubblyness_avesize | similar_to_78960338290_bubblyness_x

License

http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

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