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12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science (MIT) 12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science (MIT)

Description

Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. It stresses the integration of central scientific concepts in environmental policy making and the chemistry, biology, and geology environmental science tracks. It revisits the selected core themes for students who have already acquired a basic understanding of environmental science concepts. The topic for this term is Global Respiration. Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. It stresses the integration of central scientific concepts in environmental policy making and the chemistry, biology, and geology environmental science tracks. It revisits the selected core themes for students who have already acquired a basic understanding of environmental science concepts. The topic for this term is Global Respiration.

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | global respiration | global respiration | carbon dioxide | carbon dioxide | carbon cycle | carbon cycle | global warming | global warming | evolution | evolution | complex life | complex life

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science (MIT) 12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science (MIT)

Description

Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. Stresses integration of central scientific concepts in environmental policy making and the chemistry, biology, and geology environmental science tracks. Revisits selected core themes for students who have already acquired a basic understanding of environmental science concepts. The topic for this term is geoengineering. Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. Stresses integration of central scientific concepts in environmental policy making and the chemistry, biology, and geology environmental science tracks. Revisits selected core themes for students who have already acquired a basic understanding of environmental science concepts. The topic for this term is geoengineering.

Subjects

environmental science | environmental science | geoengineering | geoengineering | geology | geology | geochemistry | geochemistry | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | planetary exploration | planetary exploration | coastal land-use policy | coastal land-use policy | international regulations for protecting the open-ocean environment | international regulations for protecting the open-ocean environment | environmental change | environmental change | natural hazards | natural hazards

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ENVS590 - Special Topics in Environmental Sciences ENVS590 - Special Topics in Environmental Sciences

Description

The aim of the course is to introduce the components and structure of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). This course provides students with a working knowledge of the environmental impact assessment process and the information, including environmen The aim of the course is to introduce the components and structure of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). This course provides students with a working knowledge of the environmental impact assessment process and the information, including environmen

Subjects

Special Topics in Environmental Sciences | Special Topics in Environmental Sciences

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/

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12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science (MIT)

Description

Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. It stresses the integration of central scientific concepts in environmental policy making and the chemistry, biology, and geology environmental science tracks. It revisits the selected core themes for students who have already acquired a basic understanding of environmental science concepts. The topic for this term is Global Respiration.

Subjects

Environmental Science | global respiration | carbon dioxide | carbon cycle | global warming | evolution | complex life

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Working with our environment: an introduction Working with our environment: an introduction

Description

Global warming: are we responsible? Is our environmental impact damaging the planet? This free course, Working with our environment: an introduction, examines the use of ozone-depleting technology, the impact of fossil fuel use and explores how the development of technology can influence the direction of a society. From the Industrial Revolution to the present day, find out how we have changed the planet. First published on Wed, 30 Mar 2016 as Working with our environment: an introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Global warming: are we responsible? Is our environmental impact damaging the planet? This free course, Working with our environment: an introduction, examines the use of ozone-depleting technology, the impact of fossil fuel use and explores how the development of technology can influence the direction of a society. From the Industrial Revolution to the present day, find out how we have changed the planet. First published on Wed, 30 Mar 2016 as Working with our environment: an introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 30 Mar 2016 as Working with our environment: an introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 30 Mar 2016 as Working with our environment: an introduction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | global warming | global warming | T172_1 | T172_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review

Description

Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review is the fifth and final course in the series on mathematical modelling. In this free course we revisit the model developed in the first course of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks, Developing modelling skills and Modelling heat transfer. First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review is the fifth and final course in the series on mathematical modelling. In this free course we revisit the model developed in the first course of this series on pollution in the Great Lakes of North America. Here we evaluate and revise the original model by comparing its predictions against data from the lakes before finally reflecting on the techniques used. This course assumes you have studied the courses Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, Analysing skid marks, Developing modelling skills and Modelling heat transfer. First published on Fri, 29 Jul 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes: a review. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | MSXR209_5 | MSXR209_5

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Managing coastal environments Managing coastal environments

Description

Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there. First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as Managing coastal environments. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there. First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as Managing coastal environments. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | Coast | Coast | climate change | climate change | conservation | conservation | U216_1 | U216_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Statistics for Geography and Environmental Science: an introduction in R: Getting Started

Description

Nine-page document to accompany the textbook 'Statistics for Geography and Environmental Science' by Richard Harris and Claire Jarvis (Prentice Hall, 2011). Explains the importance of students in geography, environmental science and related disciplines having a reasonable knowledge of statistics and of quantitative approaches for research, and for social and scientific debate.

Subjects

statistics | geography | economics | destress project | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Statistics for Geography and Environmental Science: an introductory lecture course

Description

Powerpoint slides providing the framework for an introductory statistics course, especially suitable for students in geography and environmental science. The slides are designed to be used in conjunction with the book Statistics for Geography and Environmental Science by Harris and Jarvis (Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2011).

Subjects

statistics | geography | environmental science | quantitative methods | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes

Description

This free course, Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, is the first in the series of five courses that introduce the idea of modelling with mathematics. The course centres on a mathematical model of how pollution levels in the Great Lakes of North America vary over a period of time. It demonstrates that, by keeping the model as simple as possible, extremely complex systems can be understood and predicted. First published on Wed, 20 Apr 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 This free course, Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes, is the first in the series of five courses that introduce the idea of modelling with mathematics. The course centres on a mathematical model of how pollution levels in the Great Lakes of North America vary over a period of time. It demonstrates that, by keeping the model as simple as possible, extremely complex systems can be understood and predicted. First published on Wed, 20 Apr 2011 as Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | MSXR209_1 | MSXR209_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Eutrophication Eutrophication

Description

Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earths biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This free course explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Eutrophication. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earths biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This free course explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Eutrophication. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | biodiversity | biodiversity | phytoplankton | phytoplankton | ecosystem | ecosystem | algae | algae | nitrogen | nitrogen | phosphorus | phosphorus | S216_1 | S216_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Future energy demand and supply Future energy demand and supply

Description

When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | energy | energy | future | future | global warming | global warming | acid rain | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective

Description

Alternative energy sources are seen by many people as potential solutions to the many economic and environmental challenges posed by the current dominance of world energy supply by fossil and nucler fuels. Just how realistic are these hopes? Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective, is a free course that summarises the technical and geographic challenges posed by each alternative source. It is left to you to judge the feasibility of implementing these changes against the claims for 'alternative' solutions to global energy challenges that are regularly made. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Alternative energy sources are seen by many people as potential solutions to the many economic and environmental challenges posed by the current dominance of world energy supply by fossil and nucler fuels. Just how realistic are these hopes? Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective, is a free course that summarises the technical and geographic challenges posed by each alternative source. It is left to you to judge the feasibility of implementing these changes against the claims for 'alternative' solutions to global energy challenges that are regularly made. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Alternative energy in perspective. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The frozen planet The frozen planet

Description

This free course is a general introduction to the frozen planet, including the temperature in the polar regions; the energy from the Sun and the seasons; reading and understanding graphs and maps; and how the Arctic and Antarctic regions are defined. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The frozen planet. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course is a general introduction to the frozen planet, including the temperature in the polar regions; the energy from the Sun and the seasons; reading and understanding graphs and maps; and how the Arctic and Antarctic regions are defined. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The frozen planet. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | Albedo | Albedo | Antarctic | Antarctic | arctic circle | arctic circle | energy | energy | Frozen Planet | Frozen Planet | latitude | latitude | maps | maps | polar front | polar front | seasons | seasons | temperature | temperature

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Social issues and GM crops Social issues and GM crops

Description

The genetic manipulation of plants and animals and their use in agriculture is one of the most controversial scientific developments of recent times. This free course, Social issues and GM crops, takes a look at the science behind the headlines and the complex interactions between scientific and social factors. By the end of the course it's hoped that you will have a clearer idea not only of what is possible with GM but what may be considered desirable. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Social issues and GM crops. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The genetic manipulation of plants and animals and their use in agriculture is one of the most controversial scientific developments of recent times. This free course, Social issues and GM crops, takes a look at the science behind the headlines and the complex interactions between scientific and social factors. By the end of the course it's hoped that you will have a clearer idea not only of what is possible with GM but what may be considered desirable. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Social issues and GM crops. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Social issues and GM crops. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Social issues and GM crops. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | plants | plants | animals | animals | agriculture | agriculture | health | health | safety | safety | risk | risk | S250_2 | S250_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources

Description

Energy resources are essential for any society, be it one dependent on subsistence farming or an industrialised country. There are many different sources of energy, some well-known such as coal or petroleum, others less so, such as tides or the heat inside the Earth. Is nuclear power a salvation or a nightmare? This free course, Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources, provides background information to each, so that you can assess them for yourself. First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Energy resources are essential for any society, be it one dependent on subsistence farming or an industrialised country. There are many different sources of energy, some well-known such as coal or petroleum, others less so, such as tides or the heat inside the Earth. Is nuclear power a salvation or a nightmare? This free course, Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources, provides background information to each, so that you can assess them for yourself. First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 23 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | cell | cell | cellular | cellular | DNA | DNA | chloroplasts | chloroplasts | teacher education | teacher education | mentoring | mentoring | education | education | PGCE | PGCE | induction | induction | Open Education Week | Open Education Week | international management | international management | rescue | rescue | person-centred care | person-centred care | Keeping Britain Alive | Keeping Britain Alive | reproductive health | reproductive health | screening | screening

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Nuclear energy Energy resources: Nuclear energy

Description

The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Nuclear energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Nuclear energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | passenger cars | passenger cars | CO2 | CO2 | law | law | food technology | food technology | flavour | flavour | scandals | scandals | gothic revival | gothic revival | industrial design | industrial design | postmodernism | postmodernism | overcrowding | overcrowding | infinities | infinities | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | emergency communications | emergency communications

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Groundwater Groundwater

Description

Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many reas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Groundwater is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many reas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Groundwater is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

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Energy resources: Water quality Energy resources: Water quality

Description

Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Energy resources: Water quality is a free course that helps explain the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Energy resources: Water quality is a free course that helps explain the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | water | water | pollution | pollution

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Wave energy Energy resources: Wave energy

Description

The energy carried by ocean waves derives from a proportion of the wind energy transferred to the ocean surface by frictional drag. So, ultimately it stems from the proportion of incoming solar energy that drives air movement. Just how much energy is carried by a single wave depends on the wind speed and the area of ocean surface that it crosses; wave height, wavelength, and therefore wave energy, are functions of the distance or fetch over which the wind blows. This free course, Energy resources: Wave energy, considers wave power as a source of useable energy and whether or not it can ever make any significant contribution to global energy supplies. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Wave energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creat The energy carried by ocean waves derives from a proportion of the wind energy transferred to the ocean surface by frictional drag. So, ultimately it stems from the proportion of incoming solar energy that drives air movement. Just how much energy is carried by a single wave depends on the wind speed and the area of ocean surface that it crosses; wave height, wavelength, and therefore wave energy, are functions of the distance or fetch over which the wind blows. This free course, Energy resources: Wave energy, considers wave power as a source of useable energy and whether or not it can ever make any significant contribution to global energy supplies. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Wave energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creat

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Tidal energy Energy resources: Tidal energy

Description

The rise and fall of ocean tides result from the combined gravitational pull on water by the Moon and, to a lesser extent, the Sun, which exerts a force on water directed towards the two astronomical bodies. These gravitational effects combine with centrifugal forces that result from the Earth and the Moon orbiting each other. All of which makes tidal change a complex process. Energy resources: Tidal energy, is a free course that considers the power of the ocean tides as a potential source of useable energy and whether or not it can ever make any significant contribution to global energy supplies. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Tidal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The rise and fall of ocean tides result from the combined gravitational pull on water by the Moon and, to a lesser extent, the Sun, which exerts a force on water directed towards the two astronomical bodies. These gravitational effects combine with centrifugal forces that result from the Earth and the Moon orbiting each other. All of which makes tidal change a complex process. Energy resources: Tidal energy, is a free course that considers the power of the ocean tides as a potential source of useable energy and whether or not it can ever make any significant contribution to global energy supplies. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Tidal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Tidal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Tidal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Solar energy Energy resources: Solar energy

Description

Energy from sources other than fossil and nuclear fuels is to a large extent free of the concerns about environmental effects and renewability that characterize those two sources. Each alternative source supplies energy continuall, whether or not we use it, and most have their origins in energy generated outside the Earth, yet the potential of each is limited by its total supply set against its rate of use. The Sun will radiate energy until it ceases thermonuclear fusion, in around 5 billion years. This free course, Energy resources: Solar energy, explores the Sun as a potential source of usable energy. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Solar energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Energy from sources other than fossil and nuclear fuels is to a large extent free of the concerns about environmental effects and renewability that characterize those two sources. Each alternative source supplies energy continuall, whether or not we use it, and most have their origins in energy generated outside the Earth, yet the potential of each is limited by its total supply set against its rate of use. The Sun will radiate energy until it ceases thermonuclear fusion, in around 5 billion years. This free course, Energy resources: Solar energy, explores the Sun as a potential source of usable energy. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Solar energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Solar energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Solar energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | personal | personal | participations | participations

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Geothermal energy Energy resources: Geothermal energy

Description

Energy from sources other than fossil and nuclear fuels is, to a large extent, free of the concerns about environmental effects and renewability that characterise those two sources. Each alternative source supplies energy continually, whether or not we use it. This free course, Energy resources: Geothermal energy, considers one of these alternative sources, geothermal energy, derived from the interior heat of the Earth, and the potential for this alternative to supplant fossil and nuclear fuel to power social needs fast enough to avoid the likelihood of future global warming and other kinds of pollution. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Geothermal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Energy from sources other than fossil and nuclear fuels is, to a large extent, free of the concerns about environmental effects and renewability that characterise those two sources. Each alternative source supplies energy continually, whether or not we use it. This free course, Energy resources: Geothermal energy, considers one of these alternative sources, geothermal energy, derived from the interior heat of the Earth, and the potential for this alternative to supplant fossil and nuclear fuel to power social needs fast enough to avoid the likelihood of future global warming and other kinds of pollution. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Geothermal energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | diagnosis | diagnosis

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Hydropower Energy resources: Hydropower

Description

Hydroelectric energy is ultimately solar energy converted through evaporation of water, movement of air masses and precipitation to gravitational potential energy and then to the kinetic energy of water flowing down a slope. That energy was harnessed for centuries through the use of water wheels to drive mills, forges and textile works, before being supplanted by coal-fired steam energy. The free course, Energy resources: Hydropower, considers hydropower as a potential source of useable energy. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Hydropower. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Hydroelectric energy is ultimately solar energy converted through evaporation of water, movement of air masses and precipitation to gravitational potential energy and then to the kinetic energy of water flowing down a slope. That energy was harnessed for centuries through the use of water wheels to drive mills, forges and textile works, before being supplanted by coal-fired steam energy. The free course, Energy resources: Hydropower, considers hydropower as a potential source of useable energy. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Hydropower. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Hydropower. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Hydropower. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Coal Energy resources: Coal

Description

During the Industrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we import more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this free course, Energy resources: Coal, it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Coal. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 During the Industrial Revolution half of the world's coal came from Britain. We still rely heavily on it today to meet our energy needs, but now we import more than we produce. Burning it introduces large amounts of gases into the atmosphere that harm the environment in a variety of ways. In this free course, Energy resources: Coal, it will become apparent that the most appealing quality of coal is that there is plenty of it. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Coal. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Coal. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Coal. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | industrial accidents | industrial accidents | road safety | road safety | workers | workers | private education | private education | ethics | ethics | detox | detox | neonatal | neonatal | L194 | L194 | food shopping | food shopping | ordering food | ordering food | internal combustion engines | internal combustion engines

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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