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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth-Century Hispanic American Literature), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.508 (Regime Change), and 17.554 (Political Economy of Latin America). This HASS-D/CI course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth-Century Hispanic American Literature), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.508 (Regime Change), and 17.554 (Political Economy of Latin America).

Subjects

market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes | 21F.084J | 21F.084J | 21F.084 | 21F.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21G.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT) 21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21G.084 | 21A.224 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Latin America | Latin America | conquest | conquest | slavery | slavery | race | race | class | class | Salvador Allende | Salvador Allende | Democracy | Democracy | revolution | revolution | Environment | Environment | ecology | ecology | land disputes | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Patrick Gale, Author. Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes shor In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Patrick Gale, Author. Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes shor

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Literature | Literature | Fiction | Fiction | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with Professor Ron Carter) and chair of the Health Language Research Group at the University of Nottingham, bringing together academics and clinicians to advance applied linguistics in health care settings. In 2008 he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Crawford’s scholarship in the core areas of literature, linguisti Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with Professor Ron Carter) and chair of the Health Language Research Group at the University of Nottingham, bringing together academics and clinicians to advance applied linguistics in health care settings. In 2008 he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Crawford’s scholarship in the core areas of literature, linguisti In this video Professor Paul Crawford presents the Madness & Literature Network's seminar on Mental Illness and Creativity, featuring the respected authors Patrick Gale and Paul Sayer. Presentation produced and delivered May 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Paul Crawford, School of Midwifery & Physiotherapy Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with In this video Professor Paul Crawford presents the Madness & Literature Network's seminar on Mental Illness and Creativity, featuring the respected authors Patrick Gale and Paul Sayer. Presentation produced and delivered May 2009 Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education Professor Paul Crawford, School of Midwifery & Physiotherapy Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Literature | Literature | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | Fiction | Fiction | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network

Description

You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube In this video author Paul Sayer shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Patrick Gale. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Paul Sayer, Author. Paul Sayer is a former psychiatric nurse whose first novel The Comforts of Madness (1988) won the Constable Trophy, the Whitbread First Novel prize, and the Whitbread Book of the Year award. His five subsequent books include The Absolution Game (1992), Booker Prize 'long-listed', and Men in Rage (1999) published by Bloomsbury. His work has been translated into ten languages, and he has been the recipient of a number of scholarships, including a Society In this video author Paul Sayer shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Patrick Gale. Presentation delivered May 2009. Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education Paul Sayer, Author. Paul Sayer is a former psychiatric nurse whose first novel The Comforts of Madness (1988) won the Constable Trophy, the Whitbread First Novel prize, and the Whitbread Book of the Year award. His five subsequent books include The Absolution Game (1992), Booker Prize 'long-listed', and Men in Rage (1999) published by Bloomsbury. His work has been translated into ten languages, and he has been the recipient of a number of scholarships, including a Society

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Mental Health | Mental Health | Madness | Madness | Nursing | Nursing | Creativity | Creativity | Literature | Literature | Representations of Madness | Representations of Madness | Health Humanities | Health Humanities | Fiction | Fiction | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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LIT 331: World Literature II: Africa and the Middle East, Asia, and Europe LIT 331: World Literature II: Africa and the Middle East, Asia, and Europe

Description

Literature 331 offers students an opportunity to enhance their understanding of contemporary global interactions by exploring a diverse array of culturally expressive artifacts---novels, short stories, and poems--grouped geographically by region. Course readings represent the following regions: Europe, Asia, and Africa and the Middle East. A second course, Literature 330, covers the literature of North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Australia and Oceania. Literature 331 offers students an opportunity to enhance their understanding of contemporary global interactions by exploring a diverse array of culturally expressive artifacts---novels, short stories, and poems--grouped geographically by region. Course readings represent the following regions: Europe, Asia, and Africa and the Middle East. A second course, Literature 330, covers the literature of North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Australia and Oceania.

Subjects

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21G.041 Topics in South Asian Literature and Culture (MIT) 21G.041 Topics in South Asian Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject aims to provide an overview of contemporary texts in regional languages in South Asian Literature and Cinema. We will cover major authors and film makers, writing from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Within India, we will look at authors and directors working in different regional languages and as we examine their different socio-cultural, political and historical contexts we will attempt to understand what it means to study them under the all-unifying category of "South Asian Literature and Culture". Some of the major issues we shall explore include caste, gender, globalization and social change. We will end with exploring some of the newer, younger writers and directors and try to analyze some of the thematic and formal shifts in their work. Autho This subject aims to provide an overview of contemporary texts in regional languages in South Asian Literature and Cinema. We will cover major authors and film makers, writing from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Within India, we will look at authors and directors working in different regional languages and as we examine their different socio-cultural, political and historical contexts we will attempt to understand what it means to study them under the all-unifying category of "South Asian Literature and Culture". Some of the major issues we shall explore include caste, gender, globalization and social change. We will end with exploring some of the newer, younger writers and directors and try to analyze some of the thematic and formal shifts in their work. Autho

Subjects

South Asian literature and cinema | South Asian literature and cinema | Bangladesh | India | Nepal | Pakistan | Sri Lanka | Bangladesh | India | Nepal | Pakistan | Sri Lanka | caste | gender | globalization | social change | Ashapurna Devi | caste | gender | globalization | social change | Ashapurna Devi | Manto | Manto | Vijayan | Vijayan | Premchand | Premchand | Mohanty | Mohanty | Nasreen | Nasreen | Adoor Gopalakrishnan | Adoor Gopalakrishnan | Satyajit Ray | Satyajit Ray | Shyam Benegal | Shyam Benegal | Aparna Sen | Aparna Sen | Rituporno Ghosh | Rituporno Ghosh

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction, and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction, and Drama (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works read include Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Marsh, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature read in translation. Taught in English. This course is an introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works read include Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Marsh, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature read in translation. Taught in English.

Subjects

chinese poetry | chinese poetry | chinese culture | chinese culture | chinese | chinese | novel | novel | the story of the western wing | the story of the western wing | three kingdoms | three kingdoms | outlaws of the marsh | outlaws of the marsh | the journey to the west | the journey to the west | the story of the stone | the story of the stone | monkey | monkey | film adaptation | film adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT)

Description

Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English. Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English.

Subjects

genre | genre | tradition | tradition | Chinese poetry | Chinese poetry | Chinese fiction | Chinese fiction | Chinese drama | Chinese drama | Journey to the West | Journey to the West | Outlaws of the Margin | Outlaws of the Margin | Dream of the Red Chamber | Dream of the Red Chamber | Tang dynasty poets | Tang dynasty poets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.269 Literature, Ethics, Authority (MIT) 15.269 Literature, Ethics, Authority (MIT)

Description

Literature, Ethics, and Authority uses story in the form of readings and movies to address the relationship between ethics and leadership. The course covers a range of topics, from issues of diversity and gender in the workplace to coping with the human realities of war and death. The course syllabus includes short stories, novels, plays, works of non-fiction, and films, and is representative of many different cultures and nationalities. This class is taught as a seminar to encourage discussion of these issues. Literature, Ethics, and Authority uses story in the form of readings and movies to address the relationship between ethics and leadership. The course covers a range of topics, from issues of diversity and gender in the workplace to coping with the human realities of war and death. The course syllabus includes short stories, novels, plays, works of non-fiction, and films, and is representative of many different cultures and nationalities. This class is taught as a seminar to encourage discussion of these issues.

Subjects

ethics in society | ethics in society | authority | authority | leadership | leadership | social enterprise | social enterprise | literature | literature | film | film | moral compass | moral compass | diversity | diversity | individual values | individual values | story and management | story and management

License

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21F.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21F.020J (New World Literature), 21F.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21F.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21F.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes | 21F.084 | 21A.224

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Literature, Comics, and Culture (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi In this course, we will investigate popular culture and narrative by focusing on the relationship between literary texts and comics. Several questions shape the syllabus and provide a framework for approaching the course materials: How do familiar aspects of comics trace their origins to literary texts and broader cultural concerns? How have classic comics gone on to influence literary fiction? In what ways do contemporary graphic narratives bring a new kind of seriousness of purpose to comics, blurring what's left of the boundaries between the highbrow and the lowbrow? Readings and materials for the course range from the nineteenth century to the present, and include novels, short stories, essays, older and newer comics, and some older and newer films. Expectations include diligent readi

Subjects

Popular Culture and Narrative | Popular Culture and Narrative | Literature | Literature | Comics | Comics | Culture | Culture | Literary Fiction | Literary Fiction | Contemporary | Contemporary | Graphic Narratives | Graphic Narratives | broader cultural concerns | broader cultural concerns | contemporary graphic narratives | contemporary graphic narratives

License

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights (MIT)

Description

Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré, Central to our era is the gradual movement of all the world's regions toward a uniform standard of economic and political development. In this class we will read a variety of recent narratives that partake of, dissent from, or contribute to this story, ranging from novels and poems to World Bank and IMF statements and National Geographic reports. We will seek to understand the many motives and voices – sometimes congruent, sometimes clashing – that are currently engaged in producing accounts of people in the developing world: their hardships, laughter, and courage, and how they help themselves and are helped by outsiders who may or may not have philanthropic motives. Readings will include literature by J. G. Ballard, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, and John le Carré,

Subjects

developing world | developing world | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | industrialization | industrialization | economic development | economic development | human rights | human rights | global human rights | global human rights | global issues | global issues | global development | global development | literary perspective | literary perspective | Jamaica Kincaid | Jamaica Kincaid | JG Ballard | JG Ballard | John le Carre | John le Carre | Rohinton Mistry | Rohinton Mistry | World Bank | World Bank | National Geographic | National Geographic

License

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer (MIT)

Description

The course explores the literary masterworks of three of the most celebrated authors of the Middle Ages in their original literary and historical contexts. The various themes they take up - the importance of writing in the vernacular; the discourse of love as a form of discipline practised upon the self; the personal and political aspirations of the self in society; the constitution of ideal forms of social organization; the role of religion in the life and works of lay authors - transformed the course of much of Western literature for the next five centuries. Readings will include the entire Divine Comedy, generous selections from the Decameron, and all of Troilus and Criseyde in the original Middle English, together with samplings from the Troubadour tradition and the dolce stil nuovo. The course explores the literary masterworks of three of the most celebrated authors of the Middle Ages in their original literary and historical contexts. The various themes they take up - the importance of writing in the vernacular; the discourse of love as a form of discipline practised upon the self; the personal and political aspirations of the self in society; the constitution of ideal forms of social organization; the role of religion in the life and works of lay authors - transformed the course of much of Western literature for the next five centuries. Readings will include the entire Divine Comedy, generous selections from the Decameron, and all of Troilus and Criseyde in the original Middle English, together with samplings from the Troubadour tradition and the dolce stil nuovo.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | masterworks | masterworks | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | writing | writing | vernacular | vernacular | discourse of love | discourse of love | discipline | discipline | self | self | personal | personal | political | political | aspirations | aspirations | society | society | ideal forms | ideal forms | social organization | social organization | religion | religion | life | life | Western literature | Western literature | Divine Comedy | Divine Comedy | Decameron | Decameron | Troilus and Criseyde | Troilus and Criseyde | troubadour tradition | troubadour tradition | dolce stil nuovo. | dolce stil nuovo. | dolce stil nuovo | dolce stil nuovo

License

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21L.481 Victorian Literature and Culture (MIT) 21L.481 Victorian Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

The course covers British literature and culture during Queen Victoria's long reign, 1837-1901. This was the brilliant age of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Lewis Carroll, George Eliot, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson – and many others. It was also the age of urbanization, steam power, class conflict, Darwin, religious crisis, imperial expansion, information explosion, bureaucratization – and much more. The course covers British literature and culture during Queen Victoria's long reign, 1837-1901. This was the brilliant age of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Lewis Carroll, George Eliot, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson – and many others. It was also the age of urbanization, steam power, class conflict, Darwin, religious crisis, imperial expansion, information explosion, bureaucratization – and much more.

Subjects

English Literature | English Literature | Victorian | Victorian | Culture | Culture | Fiction | Fiction | Nonfiction | Nonfiction | Poetry | Poetry | Queen Victoria | Queen Victoria | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | Bronte | Bronte | Lewis Carroll | Lewis Carroll | George Eliot | George Eliot | Robert Browning | Robert Browning | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Arthur Conan Doyle | Arthur Conan Doyle | Rudyard Kipling | Rudyard Kipling | Alfred Lord Tennyson | Alfred Lord Tennyson | Urbanization | Urbanization | Class conflict | Class conflict | Darwin | Darwin | Religion | Religion | Imperialism | Imperialism | Bureaucracy | Bureaucracy | British | British | Thomas Carlyle | Thomas Carlyle | John Ruskin | John Ruskin | Elizabeth Gaskell | Elizabeth Gaskell | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Henry Mayhew | Henry Mayhew | Isabella Beeton | Isabella Beeton

License

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Fiction | Drama | Drama | Poetry | Poetry | Joyce | Joyce | Yeats | Yeats | Bolger | Bolger | Beckett | Beckett | O'Brien | O'Brien | Trevor | Trevor | Lavin | Lavin | McGahern | McGahern | Dorcey | Dorcey | Doyle | Doyle | Berkeley | Berkeley | Friel | Friel | Heaney | Heaney | Crotty | Crotty | Boland | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Meehan | Carr | Carr

License

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21G.084J Introduction to Latin American Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin American politics and society for undergraduates at MIT. No background on the region is required. Overall workload (reading, writing, class participation, and examinations) is similar to that of other HASS-D courses. Many of the themes raised here are covered in greater detail in other courses: 21G.020J (New World Literature), 21G.716 (Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature), 21G.730 (Twentieth and Twentyfirst-Century Spanish American Literaturere), 21G.735 (Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film), 21A.220 (The Conquest of America), 21H.802 (Modern Latin America), 3.982 (The Ancient Andean World), 3.983 (Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization), 17.507 (Democratization and Democratic Collapse), and 17.554 (Political Economy o

Subjects

21G.084 | 21A.224 | market-oriented reform | Latin America | conquest | slavery | race | class | Salvador Allende | Democracy | revolution | Environment | ecology | land disputes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Medieval Women Writers (MIT)

Description

This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t This survey provides a general introduction to medieval European literature (from Late Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century) from the perspective of women writers from a variety of cultures, social backgrounds, and historical timeperiods. Though much of the class will be devoted to exploring the evolution of a new literary tradition by and for women from its earliest emergence in the West, wider historical and cultural movements will also be addressed: the Fall of the Roman Empire, the growth of religious communities, the shift from orality to literacy, the culture of chivalry and courtly love, the emergence of scholasticism and universities, changes in devotional practices, the persecution of heretics, the rise of nationalism and class consciousness. Authors will include some of t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | Literature | Literature | Late antiquity | Late antiquity | Fifteenth century | Fifteenth century | 15th | 15th | Culture | Culture | Society | Society | Women | Women | History | History | Roman empire | Roman empire | Religion | Religion | Literacy | Literacy | Chivalry | Chivalry | Scholasticism | Scholasticism | University | University | Education | Education | Heretics | Heretics | Nationalism | Nationalism | Class | Class | Hierarchy | Hierarchy | Hildegard of Bingen | Hildegard of Bingen | Heloise of Paris | Heloise of Paris | Marie de France | Marie de France | Christine de Pizan | Christine de Pizan | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Margery Kempe | Margery Kempe | SP.514 | SP.514 | WMN.514 | WMN.514

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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?????? Approaches to Literature ?????? Approaches to Literature

Description

?????? Approaches to Literature ?????2014/04/12 5:40 PM ?????? Approaches to Literature ?????2014/04/12 5:40 PM

Subjects

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