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Social Administration Diploma, 1979-1980

Description

Back Row: Abhimanyu Singh, Mariela Licha, Masimba Chibwe, Salih Yusuf, H. Canino, Suzana Jorge Netto, Roberto Castanon, Jung Woo Kim, P. Manitas, Ali Akban, A.R Mannan, Phrang Roy, Al-Sachan, Next Row: Macleod Nyirongo, K. Moodley, Ethra Johnson, Maria Pablo, Areeya Rojvithee, Isiti Wibowo, Ms Jolikashia, Anne Khasakhala, Patricia Kahari, J. Mc Farlane, Seated: John Carrier, Huw Rees, Jimmy Midgley, Gay Grant, Margaret Hardiman, Emma Hooper, E. Nargwende, Rai Naimat Ali, On floor: Fook Cheung Ting, S. Ban, Patricia Swift, N. Svolaiski, Y. Mugase IMAGELIBRARY/240 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | aroundtheschool1980s | 1980s

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7.345 Non-coding RNAs: Junk or Critical Regulators in Health and Disease? (MIT)

Description

Every time we scientists think that we have dissected the precise biological nature of a process, an incidental finding, a brilliantly designed experiment, or an unexpected result can turn our world upside down. Until recently thought by many to be cellular "junk" because they do not encode proteins, non-coding RNAs are gaining a growing recognition for their roles in the regulation of a wide scope of processes, ranging from embryogenesis and development to cancer and degenerative disorders. The aim of this class is to introduce the diversity of the RNA world, inhabited by microRNAs, lincRNAs, piRNAs, and many others. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in us

Subjects

Non-coding RNAs | microRNAs | lincRNAs | piRNAs | RNA interference | miRNA | tumor suppressors and oncogenes | RNAi therapeutics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.02 Electricity and Magnetism: TEAL:Studio Physics Project (MIT) 8.02 Electricity and Magnetism: TEAL:Studio Physics Project (MIT)

Description

Introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter; conductors and dielectrics. Concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy. Electric currents, magnetic fields and Ampere's law. Magnetic materials. Time-varying fields and Faraday's law of induction. Basic electric circuits. Electromagnetic waves and Maxwell's equations.Staff Credits for TEAL Visualizations:Project Manager: Andrew McKinneyJava 3D Applets: Andrew McKinney, Philip Bailey, Pierre Poignant, Ying Cao, Ralph Rabat, Mikael Rechtsman3D Illustration/Animation: Mark BessetteShockWave Visualizations: Michael DanzigerVisualization Techniques R&D: Andreas Sundquist (DLIC), Mesrob Ohannessian (IDRAW)Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Introduction to electromagnetism and electrostatics: electric charge, Coulomb's law, electric structure of matter; conductors and dielectrics. Concepts of electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy. Electric currents, magnetic fields and Ampere's law. Magnetic materials. Time-varying fields and Faraday's law of induction. Basic electric circuits. Electromagnetic waves and Maxwell's equations.Staff Credits for TEAL Visualizations:Project Manager: Andrew McKinneyJava 3D Applets: Andrew McKinney, Philip Bailey, Pierre Poignant, Ying Cao, Ralph Rabat, Mikael Rechtsman3D Illustration/Animation: Mark BessetteShockWave Visualizations: Michael DanzigerVisualization Techniques R&D: Andreas Sundquist (DLIC), Mesrob Ohannessian (IDRAW)Technical RequirementsRealOne™

Subjects

dielectrics | dielectrics | conductors | conductors | electric structure of matter | electric structure of matter | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | electrostatics | electrostatics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Reginald Stains alias Brown, chief steward, arrested for false pretences

Description

Name: Reginald Stains alias Brown Arrested for: not given Arrested at: North Shields Arrested on: 4 December 1915 Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-262-Reginald Stains AKA Brown The Shields Daily News for 15 December 1915 reports: ?NORTH SHIELDS FALSE PRETENCES CASE. ACCUSED COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. Reginald Ashley Staines (30), chief steward, of 23 Milton Terrace, was brought up on remand at North Shields today, charged with having obtained by false pretences on the 22nd Nov. from Joseph Randell, the sum of £15 and on the 23rd ult. a further sum of £7 from Joseph Randell and Ed. Perris and on the same date in a like manner, the sum of £5 from William Manson Bews, with intent to cheat and defraud. Mr Frankham of Newcastle defended. Joseph Randell of 40 Drummond Terrace stated that in the early part of November last defendant came to his shop and made reference to some previous groceries and wanted to open an account. On the 22nd October he ordered goods to be sent on board his ship. On the 22nd Nov. he wanted to cash a cheque for £15. He said he had got married and wanted to go to Liverpool and witness gave him the £15. Next day he again came to the shop and asked witness to cash another cheque for £7 and he said he would send his account from Liverpool in settlement for some goods. Witness cashed the cheque. He presented the cheques on the 22nd and 23rd Nov. and they were returned on the 24th and 25th. Mr Frankham: Defendant has had other dealings with you for groceries and provision? ? Yes. Mr Frankham: Have you cashed other cheques for him? One, for £10, which was honoured. Mr Frankham: If he had asked for the loan of a certain sum, would you have give him it? ? No. Mr Frankham: He never attempted to conceal where he was going to? ? No. Mr Frankham: You made no effort to get in touch with him? ? Yes. Mr Perris went to his mother?s and could not get his address. William Manson Bews, a tailor residing in Linskill Terrace, said that on the 23rd October the defendant came to his shop and ordered a frock suit, a jack suit, a double-breasted suit and a cap. He was dressed in a naval uniform and said the things had to be delivered to the Northumberland Arms. On the 22nd November he again came to the shop and asked for his account. He told witness he was a little short of cash. Witness gave him £5 and the defendant made out a cheque for £22 12s, in payment of the clothes and the money. The cheque was presented at Farrow?s Bank, Newcastle on the 24th and returned on the 26th. Witness still had all the clothes with the exception of the uniform. George Graham Campbell of Farrow?s Bank said that no the 24th November the cheque produced, for £15, was presented and returned, marked ?N.S.?. On that date the defendant only had £3 19s 6d in the bank. On the 25th November cheques for £7 and £22 12s were presented but the defendant only had a balance of £1 19s 6d then. Detective-Sergeant Radcliffe stated that from certain information received he went to Brighton, on the 3rd inst. and took the defendant into custody from the Brighton police. He was brought to North Shields and when questioned replied ?The only thing I can say is, the cheque must not have been met?. When charged later he made no reply. The defendant pleaded not guilty. Mr Frankham said the defendant had not the slightest intent to rob anybody of money. He had a banking account and being newly married and unwell, had gone away and given these cheques. He had about £16 on board the ship and the officers were owing him about £30. The defendant gave a cheque for £1 on the 13th November as a donation to the YMCA. He had not tried to cover up any tracks and the officers on board HMS Satellite knew where he was. The defendant, in giving evidence on his own behalf, said he was chief steward on HM Yacht Medusa II. The ship came into port on the 19th November and he had leave granted because he had been ill and he was going to be married. After the marriage he went to Liverpool and was there two days and he then went to London and Brighton. He sent his medical certificate to HMS Satellite. When he got the money from Mr Randell and Mr Bews he understood he had sufficient money in the bank to meet the cheques. Money was owing to him on board the ship but he could not say how much. He had no intention of defrauding the people. The defendant was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions?. On 6 January 1916 at Northumberland Quarter Sessions Reginald Staines was acquitted on a charge of obtaining money by false pretences from tradesmen at North Shields. These images are taken from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 (TWAM ref. DX1388/1). This set is our selection of the best mugshots taken during the First World War. They have been chosen because of the sharpness and general quality of the images. The album doesn?t record the details of each prisoner?s crimes, just their names and dates of arrest. In order to discover the stories behind the mugshots, staff from Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums visited North Shields Local Studies Library where they carefully searched through microfilm copies of the ?Shields Daily News? looking for newspaper reports of the court cases. The newspaper reports have been transcribed and added below each mugshot. Combining these two separate records gives us a fascinating insight into life on the Home Front during the First World War. These images document the lives of people of different ages and backgrounds, both civilians and soldiers. Our purpose here is not to judge them but simply to reflect the realities of their time. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

Subjects

prisoner | crime | criminal | northshields | policestation | mugshot | arrested | falsepretences | shipssteward | brighton | navaluniform | hmssatellite | hm | yacht | medusa | ii | navy | socialhistory | blackandwhitephotograph | grain | blackframe | digitalimage | man | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsfirstworldwar | reginaldstainsaliasbrown | hat | uniform | scarf | chiefsteward | arrest | portrait | criminalrecord | publicrecords | courtcase | newspaperreport | neutralbackground | wall | attentive | hair | eye | fascinating | unusual | mysterious | 4december1915 | 23miltonterrace | trial | accused | committed | remand | theshieldsdailynews | 15december1915 | money | stolen | josephrandell | stealing | edperris | williammansonbews | cheat | defraud | mrfrankham | defence | newcastle | 40drummondterrace | shop | liverpool | goods | detectivesergeantradcliffe | cheque | loan | noresponse | notguilty | hmyachtmedusaii | leave | 6january1916 | acquitted

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ÕSTICA (2010)

Description

La asignatura pretende ofrecer al alumno una base suficiente para resolver los problemas logŪsticos en los que interviene el transporte. Se persigue un dominio suficiente de los instrumentos logŪsticos y de las tťcnicas de investigaciůn operativa aplicada que sustentan una buena parte de los mismos.

Subjects

INGENIERIA E INFRAESTRUCTURA DE LOS TRANSPORTES | DISTRIBUCION FISICA | GESTION DE STOCKS | INVESTIGACION OPERATIVA | LOGISTICA | REDES | RUTAS DE REPARTO | TRANSPORTE

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Richard Morris Titmuss, c1960s

Description

Held founding chair in Social Administration at LSE Extracts from ?Obituaries: Richard Titmuss? by Howard Glennerster in LSE Magazine, November 1973, No46, p.7 ?Looking through some photographs of Richard Titmuss recently I came across one taken during the last war, in the crypt of St. Pauls. There, complete with tin hat, he was holding a seminar with other tin-hatted fire watchers and members of the red Cross. It seemed to personify the values he himself believed grew out of the war experience- a heightened social consciousness and a sense of unity which were the theme of his major work (Problems of Social Policy, 1949)on social policy during the Second World War. It was soon after this book that he was invited to take a chair at the LSE as Professor of Social Administration in 1950? He believed that it was an academic?s job to participate in policy making and administration as well as to be a critic. He gave many of his days and evenings to official meetings, informal seminars of civil servants, high and lowly. He devoted hours of his time to Royal Commissions, to Labour Study Groups, to the Community Relations Commission and the Supplementary Benefits Commission. He was fascinated by the problem of making large social service bureaucracies humane and sensitive to individual human need. He acted as a kind of bridge between government and academic life helping each to understand the other?s perspective. It was this which lay at the root of his influence on policy and gave his whole department that unique mixture of reforming zeal and practicality. As I began to set these thoughts down two events occurred together in the same week. The first was that the House of Commons Select Committee on Tax Credits welcomed a proposal that single parent families should receive a special social security benefit and also receive tax credit. This idea was one that Richard had pressed and argued for as a member of the Finer Committee on one-parent families. Indeed he was working on it in his last days. In the same week the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in the United States announced that they were to launch a national voluntary blood donor scheme. It was a proposal which sprang directly from the influence of his last book ? The Gift Relationship. These were the kinds of memorial that Richard Titmuss would have appreciated most.? IMAGELIBRARY/735 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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lse | lselibrary | londonschoolofeconomics

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Sister Charlotte Alexander, 1970

Description

School Nurse 1945-1970 'Sister Charlotte Alexander, School Nurse since 1945, is also retiring...Her hard work had modest beginnings - one small room (106 in the Main building) with a divan and a first-aid box a foot square. She worked part-time until 1958 and she was the school health service until Dr Read came in 1952. In 1966 all the members of the expanding Health Service moved to their present base on the 8th floor of Connaught House which Sister rates as excellent... A statistic - Sister Alexander has seen 1,200 patients a term. Allowing for her part-time work before 1958 she has probably treated some 53,600 cases.' LSE Magazine, December 1970 No40, p.14 (Retirements) IMAGELIBRARY/732 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a... IMAGELIBRARY/731 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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lse | lselibrary | londonschoolofeconomics

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21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT) 21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT)

Description

The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | Old Regime | Old Regime | republic | republic | dictatorship | dictatorship | committee | committee | parliament | parliament | First Empire | First Empire

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Why The Russia-Azerbaijan Alliance Is Weaker Than It Looks Why The Russia-Azerbaijan Alliance Is Weaker Than It Looks

Description

On August 8, 2016, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev met in Baku. Shortly after their meeting, Putin announced Russia‚Äôs intention to forge a¬†strategic partnership with Azerbaijan. Putin also expressed interest in expanding Russia-Azerbaijan trade links and strengthening Moscow-Baku military cooperation in the Caspian Sea region. As Russia has increased its arms exports to Azerbaijan in recent years, many analysts believe that the Putin-Aliyev summit is a starting point for a consolidated Moscow-Baku alliance. This assessment overestimates the strength of the Russia-Azerbaijan partnership. There is compelling evidence that the much-touted ‚Äúalliance‚ÄĚ between Russia and Azerbaijan is merely ... On August 8, 2016, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev met in Baku. Shortly after their meeting, Putin announced Russia‚Äôs intention to forge a¬†strategic partnership with Azerbaijan. Putin also expressed interest in expanding Russia-Azerbaijan trade links and strengthening Moscow-Baku military cooperation in the Caspian Sea region. As Russia has increased its arms exports to Azerbaijan in recent years, many analysts believe that the Putin-Aliyev summit is a starting point for a consolidated Moscow-Baku alliance. This assessment overestimates the strength of the Russia-Azerbaijan partnership. There is compelling evidence that the much-touted ‚Äúalliance‚ÄĚ between Russia and Azerbaijan is merely ...

Subjects

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Richard Morris Titmuss C.B.E., F.B.A., c1960s

Description

1907-1973. Professor of Social Administration, 1950-1973 Extracts from ?Obituaries: Richard Titmuss? by Howard Glennerster in LSE Magazine, November 1973, No46, p.7 ?Looking through some photographs of Richard Titmuss recently I came across one taken during the last war, in the crypt of St. Pauls. There, complete with tin hat, he was holding a seminar with other tin-hatted fire watchers and members of the red Cross. It seemed to personify the values he himself believed grew out of the war experience- a heightened social consciousness and a sense of unity which were the theme of his major work (Problems of Social Policy, 1949)on social policy during the Second World War. It was soon after this book that he was invited to take a chair at the LSE as Professor of Social Administration in 1950? He believed that it was an academic?s job to participate in policy making and administration as well as to be a critic. He gave many of his days and evenings to official meetings, informal seminars of civil servants, high and lowly. He devoted hours of his time to Royal Commissions, to Labour Study Groups, to the Community Relations Commission and the Supplementary Benefits Commission. He was fascinated by the problem of making large social service bureaucracies humane and sensitive to individual human need. He acted as a kind of bridge between government and academic life helping each to understand the other?s perspective. It was this which lay at the root of his influence on policy and gave his whole department that unique mixture of reforming zeal and practicality. As I began to set these thoughts down two events occurred together in the same week. The first was that the House of Commons Select Committee on Tax Credits welcomed a proposal that single parent families should receive a special social security benefit and also receive tax credit. This idea was one that Richard had pressed and argued for as a member of the Finer Committee on one-parent families. Indeed he was working on it in his last days. In the same week the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in the United States announced that they were to launch a national voluntary blood donor scheme. It was a proposal which sprang directly from the influence of his last book ? The Gift Relationship. These were the kinds of memorial that Richard Titmuss would have appreciated most.? IMAGELIBRARY/970 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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lse | lselibrary | londonschoolofeconomics

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Restored Phillips Machine, 1993

Description

Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of £100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/442 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

phillipsmachine | lse | moniac | hydraulic | computer | analogue | economy | modelling | uk | 1949 | machine | oldmachine

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Consumer law Consumer law

Description

Peter is a member of the Financial Services Research Forum and of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Banking Regulation. He spent several years as a member of the UK Department of Trade of Trade and Industry’s Consumer Law Advisory Panel, and as Scientific Director of the European Credit Research Institute, Brussels. Peter has also served as Chair of the Society of Legal Scholars’ Consumer Law Panel Peter is a member of the Financial Services Research Forum and of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Banking Regulation. He spent several years as a member of the UK Department of Trade of Trade and Industry’s Consumer Law Advisory Panel, and as Scientific Director of the European Credit Research Institute, Brussels. Peter has also served as Chair of the Society of Legal Scholars’ Consumer Law Panel This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 This module looks at the role of the law in regulating business in the interests of consumers. Suitable for: Second and final year undergraduates Professor P.R Cartwright, School of Law Peter Cartwright has been Professor of Consumer Protection Law at the University of Nottingham since 2004. He previously worked at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he obtained his Ph.D. Peter is the author of several books including Consumer Protection and the Criminal Law (2001) and Banks Consumers and Regulation (2004). The former won one of the Society of Legal Scholars’ prizes for outstanding legal scholarship by a scholar under the age of 40. Peter is a member of th This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10 This module looks at the role of the law in regulating business in the interests of consumers. Suitable for: Second and final year undergraduates Professor P.R Cartwright, School of Law Peter Cartwright has been Professor of Consumer Protection Law at the University of Nottingham since 2004. He previously worked at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he obtained his Ph.D. Peter is the author of several books including Consumer Protection and the Criminal Law (2001) and Banks Consumers and Regulation (2004). The former won one of the Society of Legal Scholars’ prizes for outstanding legal scholarship by a scholar under the age of 40. Peter is a member of th

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Consumer Law | Consumer Law | Regulation | Regulation | Consumer Protection | Consumer Protection | Business and Commercial Law | Business and Commercial Law | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Frederick Mudd, arrested for stealing money

Description

Name: Frederick Mudd Arrested for: Larceny Arrested at: North Shields Police Station Arrested on: 3 April 1905 Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-69-Frederick Mudd The Shields Daily News for 11 February 1905 reports: ?ANOTHER FISH STEALER SENT TO PRISON At the North Shields Police Court this morning ? Frederick Mudd, 17 years of age, residing at 13 Reed Street, was charged with stealing a quantity of haddocks, valued at 3s, the property of the Tyne Steam Fishing Coy, on the 10th inst. PC Spindler said that on Friday afternoon he met the accused coming from the direction of the steam trawler Tyne Belle, carrying a quantity of haddocks. A soon as the accused saw him he dropped the haddocks and ran away. Afterwards he arrested the accused and charged him with stealing the fish, to which he replied, ?I have nothing to say?. A clerk representing the Tyne Steam Fishing Company estimated the value of the fish, which the accused dropped at 3s. The Bench committed prisoner to gaol for fourteen days with hard labour?. The Shields Daily News for 3 April 1905 reports: ?LARCENY FROM A NORTH SHIELDS TRAWLER. A BOY ROBS HIS BENEFACTORS. At North Shields Police Court today, Frederick Mudd (17), no fixed abode, was charged with stealing 4s, the moneys of Frederick Marriott, mate of the steam trawler Volunteer, on the 30th ult. The Prosecutor stated that before the boat cast off on March 27th the accused came on board, and in consequence of the statements he made, he was taken to sea. When the boat returned on the 30th ult. the prisoner went ashore and witness missed 4s from his coat pocket in the cabin. PC Spindler said he arrested the accused at noon on the same date. He said he was very sorry he had taken the money. Witness found 3s in his possession and got 3d at a cook shop where the prisoner had left it. In answer to the magistrates clerk (Mr R.F. Kidd) the prosecutor said that the reason the accused was taken to sea was that he stated he had no father and no mother, and accordingly they took pity on him. Prisoner pleaded guilty to this charge, and also to a further charge of stealing 2s 2d belonging to the third hand of the same steamer. Ald. Elliot said that it was very bad and very ungrateful behaviour on the part of the accused towards those who had shown him kindness by giving him food and shelter. He would be committed to prison for six weeks with hard labour?. The Shields Daily News for 12 September 1905 reports: ?THREE MONTHS FOR THEFT At North Shields Police Court today, Frederick Mudd (17), Myock?s lodging house, was charged with having stolen a pair of Wellington boots, valued at 3s the property of Edgar Beal, a youth employed on board the steam drifter Seymolicus, of Yarmouth. The prosecutor deposed on the 10th inst. he missed the boots from the fo?c?stle, where he had put them two days previously. PC Spindler said he saw the prisoner on the Fish Quay yesterday morning, wearing the boots. He charged him with having stolen them, and he replied that he bought them from a man for 6d, but on the way to the police station he said he might as well speak the truth, and admitted that he stole the boots on Friday. Chief Constable Huish said the accused, who made his 7th appearance, had been previously imprisoned for theft. He was committed for three months with hard labour?. These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne & Wear Archives (TWA ref DX1388/1). This set contains mugshots of boys and girls under the age of 21. This reflects the fact that until 1970 that was the legal age of majority in the UK. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

Subjects

prisoner | crime | criminal | northshields | policestation | mugshot | imprisoned | arrested | cap | blackandwhitephotograph | stealing | fish | theft | larceny | tynesteamfishingcompany | edwardian | young | youth | portrait | interesting | unusual | historic

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DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE’s PERSUASIVE POWER DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE’s PERSUASIVE POWER

Description

Review: Paroles Arm√©es, Comprendre et combattre la propagande terroriste. Philippe-Joseph Salazar, Lemieux editeur. 262 pages. (Armed Words: Understanding and Fighting Terrorist Propaganda) In his new book Paroles Arm√©es (forthcoming in English translation), Philippe-Joseph Salazar, a professor of rhetoric at Cape Town University sets out to deconstruct the persuasive power of the Caliphate (otherwise known as ISIS). In the war it wages against the West, words have emerged as ‚Äėnew weapons‚Äô (p.7). Salazar deploys his rhetorical expertise to shed light on our fundamental linguistic deficiency and how we are losing this war of words. Confronted with a new reality that seems ... The post DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE‚Äôs PERSUASIVE POWER appeared first on OxPol. Review: Paroles Arm√©es, Comprendre et combattre la propagande terroriste. Philippe-Joseph Salazar, Lemieux editeur. 262 pages. (Armed Words: Understanding and Fighting Terrorist Propaganda) In his new book Paroles Arm√©es (forthcoming in English translation), Philippe-Joseph Salazar, a professor of rhetoric at Cape Town University sets out to deconstruct the persuasive power of the Caliphate (otherwise known as ISIS). In the war it wages against the West, words have emerged as ‚Äėnew weapons‚Äô (p.7). Salazar deploys his rhetorical expertise to shed light on our fundamental linguistic deficiency and how we are losing this war of words. Confronted with a new reality that seems ... The post DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE‚Äôs PERSUASIVE POWER appeared first on OxPol.

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

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Politics in 60 seconds. Passive revolution Politics in 60 seconds. Passive revolution

Description

Dr Adam Morton defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on passive revolution as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Adam Morton, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Adam Morton is a Senior Lecturer and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) in the School of Politics and International Relations at The University of Nottingham. Before joining the University of Nottingham, he was a Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Lancaster University (2002-5) and an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Depar Dr Adam Morton defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on passive revolution as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Adam Morton, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Adam Morton is a Senior Lecturer and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) in the School of Politics and International Relations at The University of Nottingham. Before joining the University of Nottingham, he was a Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Lancaster University (2002-5) and an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Depar

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Politics | Politics | Political Concepts | Political Concepts | Passive Revolution | Passive Revolution | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Labour economics Labour economics

Description

As taught Spring 2011 ‚ÄėLabour Economics‚Äô Module Guide Module Code: L12322 Total Credits: 10 Offering School: Economics Suitable for study at: undergraduate Level Co-requisites: L12302 Microeconomic Theory The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L12322 ‚Äď ‚ÄėLabour Economics‚Äô, offered by the school of Economics, University of Nottingham. The module convenor is Dr R Upward. Dr Richard Upward, School of Economics, University of Nottingham Richard joined the School of Economics in 1998 as a Research Fellow, became a Lecturer in August 2001 and was promoted to Asociate Professor in August 2004. He is a Research Fellow in the Leverhulme Centre for Research on Globalisation and Economic Policy, and his current work for the Centre relate As taught Spring 2011 ‚ÄėLabour Economics‚Äô Module Guide Module Code: L12322 Total Credits: 10 Offering School: Economics Suitable for study at: undergraduate Level Co-requisites: L12302 Microeconomic Theory The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L12322 ‚Äď ‚ÄėLabour Economics‚Äô, offered by the school of Economics, University of Nottingham. The module convenor is Dr R Upward. Dr Richard Upward, School of Economics, University of Nottingham Richard joined the School of Economics in 1998 as a Research Fellow, became a Lecturer in August 2001 and was promoted to Asociate Professor in August 2004. He is a Research Fellow in the Leverhulme Centre for Research on Globalisation and Economic Policy, and his current work for the Centre relate

Subjects

UNow | UNow | L12322 | L12322 | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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RES.LL-003 Build a Small Radar System Capable of Sensing Range, Doppler, and Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (MIT) RES.LL-003 Build a Small Radar System Capable of Sensing Range, Doppler, and Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (MIT)

Description

Are you interested in building and testing your own imaging radar system? MIT Lincoln Laboratory offers this 3-week course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler, range, and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you are interested in any of the following; electronics, amateur radio, physics, or electromagnetics. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB®. Teams of three students will receive a radar kit and will attend a total of 5 sessions spanning topics from the fundamentals of radar to SAR imaging. Experiments will be performed each week as the radar kit is implemented. You will bring your radar kit into the field and perform additional experi Are you interested in building and testing your own imaging radar system? MIT Lincoln Laboratory offers this 3-week course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler, range, and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you are interested in any of the following; electronics, amateur radio, physics, or electromagnetics. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB®. Teams of three students will receive a radar kit and will attend a total of 5 sessions spanning topics from the fundamentals of radar to SAR imaging. Experiments will be performed each week as the radar kit is implemented. You will bring your radar kit into the field and perform additional experi

Subjects

applied electromagnetics | applied electromagnetics | RF design | RF design | signal processing | signal processing | analog design | analog design | radar system design | radar system design | practical electronics | practical electronics | MATLAB | MATLAB

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.89J Space Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.89J Space Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

In 16.89 / ESD.352 the students will first be asked to understand the key challenges in designing ground and space telescopes, the stakeholder structure and value flows, and the particular pros and cons of the proposed project. The first half of the class will concentrate on performing a thorough architectural analysis of the key astrophysical, engineering, human, budgetary and broader policy issues that are involved in this decision. This will require the students to carry out a qualitative and quantitative conceptual study during the first half of the semester and recommend a small set of promising architectures for further study at the Preliminary Design Review (PDR).Both lunar surface telescopes as well as orbital locations should be considered.The second half of the class will then pi In 16.89 / ESD.352 the students will first be asked to understand the key challenges in designing ground and space telescopes, the stakeholder structure and value flows, and the particular pros and cons of the proposed project. The first half of the class will concentrate on performing a thorough architectural analysis of the key astrophysical, engineering, human, budgetary and broader policy issues that are involved in this decision. This will require the students to carry out a qualitative and quantitative conceptual study during the first half of the semester and recommend a small set of promising architectures for further study at the Preliminary Design Review (PDR).Both lunar surface telescopes as well as orbital locations should be considered.The second half of the class will then pi

Subjects

16.89 | 16.89 | ESD.352 | ESD.352 | System Requirements Review | System Requirements Review | Preliminary Design Review | Preliminary Design Review | Critical Design Review | Critical Design Review | Conceptual Design Phase | Conceptual Design Phase | Preliminary Design Phase | Preliminary Design Phase | Detailed Design Phase | Detailed Design Phase | astrophysics | astrophysics | Stakeholder Analysis | Stakeholder Analysis | System Architecture | System Architecture | Radio Astronomy | Radio Astronomy | Space Telescope | Space Telescope | Interferometry | Interferometry | Lunar Logistics | Lunar Logistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.554 Political Economy of Latin America (MIT) 17.554 Political Economy of Latin America (MIT)

Description

This class explores the politics of economic reform in Latin America. Topics addressed include: Dependency, Development, and Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism; The Political Consequences of Market-Oriented Reform in Venezuela; The Mexican Peso Crisis; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule in the Southern Cone; Civil-Military Relations; Limits of Democratization; Parties and Elections in Latin America; Religion, Political Mobilization, and Civil Society; and Revolution. This class explores the politics of economic reform in Latin America. Topics addressed include: Dependency, Development, and Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism; The Political Consequences of Market-Oriented Reform in Venezuela; The Mexican Peso Crisis; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule in the Southern Cone; Civil-Military Relations; Limits of Democratization; Parties and Elections in Latin America; Religion, Political Mobilization, and Civil Society; and Revolution.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | history | history | politics | politics | economy | economy | Economic Reform | Economic Reform | Market-Oriented Reform | Market-Oriented Reform | Peso Crisis | Peso Crisis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Library Staff, c1990s

Description

Back Row: Richard Trussell, Chris Doutney, Chris Hunt, ?,?, Frances Shipsey, ?, ?, Caroline Shaw, Bernadette Divall, Chris James, Mike Blatch, Nick Wood, Claire Meredith, Dick Leggot. Second row: Paddy Driscoll, Maureen Wade, Barbara Humphries, ?,?,?, Sue Pollock, Mike McFarlane, ?, Liz Fisher, Rita Halsey, Martin Scarrot, ? Iain Baxter, Graham Camfield, Beverly Brittan, Robin ?, Ken Gibbons, Ann Green, Helen Workman, Ann Davidge. Third row: Brenda ?, Loretta Ramswell, ?, Irene Kiener, ?, ?, June Crutchlow, Cathy Lee , Thalia Knight, Janet Richardson, ?, Fran Ward, Liz Fishman, ?, ?. Front Row: Jill Breen, Shelley Taylor, Sue Donnelly, Demi Nicolaou, Elizabeth McHale, Dawn Thompson, Wendy Butcher, Helen Cuffley, Jill Cooley, Angela Raspin, Ernerst Afriyie IMAGELIBRARY/1177 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

londonschoolofeconomics | lse | lselibrary | cls

License

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ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT) ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies.

Subjects

ESD.172 | ESD.172 | EC.421 | EC.421 | energy | energy | competition | competition | innovation | innovation | incentivize prizes | incentivize prizes | resource allocation | resource allocation | innovation incentives | innovation incentives | Ansari | Ansari | X PRIZE | X PRIZE | economic models of innovation | economic models of innovation | energy storage | energy storage | grid-scale storage | grid-scale storage | prize matrix | prize matrix | genomics | genomics | Archon X PRIZE | Archon X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | grand challenges | grand challenges

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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