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髇 en Narrativa Audiovisual 髇 en Narrativa Audiovisual

Description

Este material on-line corresponde a la asignatura TENDENCIAS ACTUALES DE INVESTIGACI覰 EN NARRATIVA AUDIOVISUAL y se ha realizado para el SISTEMA EUROPEO DE TRANSFERENCIA DE CR蒁ITOS como curso de doctorado dentro del programa Procesos de la Comunicaci髇 Audiovisual. Objeto de Estudio: Balance de materia y energ韆. Flujo de fluidos. Transmisi髇 de calor. Operaciones de separaci髇 por Transferencia de materia. Marco de Referencia: Ingenier韆 T閏nica Industrial. Especialidad Qu韒ica Industrial. Procesos e Instalaciones Industriales. Este material on-line corresponde a la asignatura TENDENCIAS ACTUALES DE INVESTIGACI覰 EN NARRATIVA AUDIOVISUAL y se ha realizado para el SISTEMA EUROPEO DE TRANSFERENCIA DE CR蒁ITOS como curso de doctorado dentro del programa Procesos de la Comunicaci髇 Audiovisual. Objeto de Estudio: Balance de materia y energ韆. Flujo de fluidos. Transmisi髇 de calor. Operaciones de separaci髇 por Transferencia de materia. Marco de Referencia: Ingenier韆 T閏nica Industrial. Especialidad Qu韒ica Industrial. Procesos e Instalaciones Industriales.

Subjects

Estudios culturales | Estudios culturales | 髇 en comunicaci髇 | 髇 en comunicaci髇 | Cine | Cine | Narrativa Audiovisual | Narrativa Audiovisual | | | 韆 f韑mica feminista | 韆 f韑mica feminista | 髇 Audiovisual y Publicidad | 髇 Audiovisual y Publicidad

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DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE鈥檚 PERSUASIVE POWER DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE鈥檚 PERSUASIVE POWER

Description

Review: Paroles Arm茅es, Comprendre et combattre la propagande terroriste. Philippe-Joseph Salazar, Lemieux editeur. 262 pages. (Armed Words: Understanding and Fighting Terrorist Propaganda) In his new book Paroles Arm茅es (forthcoming in English translation), Philippe-Joseph Salazar, a professor of rhetoric at Cape Town University sets out to deconstruct the persuasive power of the Caliphate (otherwise known as ISIS). In the war it wages against the West, words have emerged as 鈥榥ew weapons鈥 (p.7). Salazar deploys his rhetorical expertise to shed light on our fundamental linguistic deficiency and how we are losing this war of words. Confronted with a new reality that seems ... The post DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE鈥檚 PERSUASIVE POWER appeared first on OxPol. Review: Paroles Arm茅es, Comprendre et combattre la propagande terroriste. Philippe-Joseph Salazar, Lemieux editeur. 262 pages. (Armed Words: Understanding and Fighting Terrorist Propaganda) In his new book Paroles Arm茅es (forthcoming in English translation), Philippe-Joseph Salazar, a professor of rhetoric at Cape Town University sets out to deconstruct the persuasive power of the Caliphate (otherwise known as ISIS). In the war it wages against the West, words have emerged as 鈥榥ew weapons鈥 (p.7). Salazar deploys his rhetorical expertise to shed light on our fundamental linguistic deficiency and how we are losing this war of words. Confronted with a new reality that seems ... The post DECONSTRUCTING THE CALIPHATE鈥檚 PERSUASIVE POWER appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

License

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Rothbard Reader The Rothbard Reader

Description

From the Introduction by Joseph T. Salerno and Matthew McCaffrey.Few economists manage to produce a body of work that boasts a serious following twenty years after their deaths. Murray N. Rothbard is a rare exception. More than two decades since his passing, his influence lives on, both in the work of a new generation of social scientists, and among a growing number of the general public.One reason for Rothbard’s continuing popularity is his ability to reach across disciplines, and to connect them: unlike many contemporary economists, who specialize in increasingly narrow fields within the science, Rothbard’s research agenda was expansive and interdisciplinary, covering most of the social sciences and humanities.Some readers of this book will already be familiar with Rothbard&r From the Introduction by Joseph T. Salerno and Matthew McCaffrey.Few economists manage to produce a body of work that boasts a serious following twenty years after their deaths. Murray N. Rothbard is a rare exception. More than two decades since his passing, his influence lives on, both in the work of a new generation of social scientists, and among a growing number of the general public.One reason for Rothbard’s continuing popularity is his ability to reach across disciplines, and to connect them: unlike many contemporary economists, who specialize in increasingly narrow fields within the science, Rothbard’s research agenda was expansive and interdisciplinary, covering most of the social sciences and humanities.Some readers of this book will already be familiar with Rothbard&r More than two decades since Rothbard's passing, his influence lives on, both in the work of a new generation of social scientists, and among a growing number of the general public. More than two decades since Rothbard's passing, his influence lives on, both in the work of a new generation of social scientists, and among a growing number of the general public.

Subjects

Austrian Economics Overview | Austrian Economics Overview

License

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Politics in 60 seconds. Passive revolution Politics in 60 seconds. Passive revolution

Description

Dr Adam Morton defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on passive revolution as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Adam Morton, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Adam Morton is a Senior Lecturer and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) in the School of Politics and International Relations at The University of Nottingham. Before joining the University of Nottingham, he was a Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Lancaster University (2002-5) and an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Depar Dr Adam Morton defines a polical concept in 60 seconds for those with a spare minute to learn something new. This videocast focuses on passive revolution as a political concept. Warning: video does contain bloopers and out takes. May 2010 Suitable for Undergraduate study and Community education Dr Adam Morton, School of Politics and International Relations Dr Adam Morton is a Senior Lecturer and Fellow of the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) in the School of Politics and International Relations at The University of Nottingham. Before joining the University of Nottingham, he was a Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Lancaster University (2002-5) and an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Postdoctoral Fellow in the Depar

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Politics | Politics | Political Concepts | Political Concepts | Passive Revolution | Passive Revolution | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Labour economics Labour economics

Description

As taught Spring 2011 鈥楲abour Economics鈥 Module Guide Module Code: L12322 Total Credits: 10 Offering School: Economics Suitable for study at: undergraduate Level Co-requisites: L12302 Microeconomic Theory The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L12322 鈥 鈥楲abour Economics鈥, offered by the school of Economics, University of Nottingham. The module convenor is Dr R Upward. Dr Richard Upward, School of Economics, University of Nottingham Richard joined the School of Economics in 1998 as a Research Fellow, became a Lecturer in August 2001 and was promoted to Asociate Professor in August 2004. He is a Research Fellow in the Leverhulme Centre for Research on Globalisation and Economic Policy, and his current work for the Centre relate As taught Spring 2011 鈥楲abour Economics鈥 Module Guide Module Code: L12322 Total Credits: 10 Offering School: Economics Suitable for study at: undergraduate Level Co-requisites: L12302 Microeconomic Theory The content presented here provides information for prospective students on module L12322 鈥 鈥楲abour Economics鈥, offered by the school of Economics, University of Nottingham. The module convenor is Dr R Upward. Dr Richard Upward, School of Economics, University of Nottingham Richard joined the School of Economics in 1998 as a Research Fellow, became a Lecturer in August 2001 and was promoted to Asociate Professor in August 2004. He is a Research Fellow in the Leverhulme Centre for Research on Globalisation and Economic Policy, and his current work for the Centre relate

Subjects

UNow | UNow | L12322 | L12322 | UKOER | UKOER

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Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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RES.LL-003 Build a Small Radar System Capable of Sensing Range, Doppler, and Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (MIT) RES.LL-003 Build a Small Radar System Capable of Sensing Range, Doppler, and Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (MIT)

Description

Are you interested in building and testing your own imaging radar system? MIT Lincoln Laboratory offers this 3-week course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler, range, and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you are interested in any of the following; electronics, amateur radio, physics, or electromagnetics. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB®. Teams of three students will receive a radar kit and will attend a total of 5 sessions spanning topics from the fundamentals of radar to SAR imaging. Experiments will be performed each week as the radar kit is implemented. You will bring your radar kit into the field and perform additional experi Are you interested in building and testing your own imaging radar system? MIT Lincoln Laboratory offers this 3-week course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler, range, and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you are interested in any of the following; electronics, amateur radio, physics, or electromagnetics. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB®. Teams of three students will receive a radar kit and will attend a total of 5 sessions spanning topics from the fundamentals of radar to SAR imaging. Experiments will be performed each week as the radar kit is implemented. You will bring your radar kit into the field and perform additional experi

Subjects

applied electromagnetics | applied electromagnetics | RF design | RF design | signal processing | signal processing | analog design | analog design | radar system design | radar system design | practical electronics | practical electronics | MATLAB | MATLAB

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.89J Space Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.89J Space Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

In 16.89 / ESD.352 the students will first be asked to understand the key challenges in designing ground and space telescopes, the stakeholder structure and value flows, and the particular pros and cons of the proposed project. The first half of the class will concentrate on performing a thorough architectural analysis of the key astrophysical, engineering, human, budgetary and broader policy issues that are involved in this decision. This will require the students to carry out a qualitative and quantitative conceptual study during the first half of the semester and recommend a small set of promising architectures for further study at the Preliminary Design Review (PDR).Both lunar surface telescopes as well as orbital locations should be considered.The second half of the class will then pi In 16.89 / ESD.352 the students will first be asked to understand the key challenges in designing ground and space telescopes, the stakeholder structure and value flows, and the particular pros and cons of the proposed project. The first half of the class will concentrate on performing a thorough architectural analysis of the key astrophysical, engineering, human, budgetary and broader policy issues that are involved in this decision. This will require the students to carry out a qualitative and quantitative conceptual study during the first half of the semester and recommend a small set of promising architectures for further study at the Preliminary Design Review (PDR).Both lunar surface telescopes as well as orbital locations should be considered.The second half of the class will then pi

Subjects

16.89 | 16.89 | ESD.352 | ESD.352 | System Requirements Review | System Requirements Review | Preliminary Design Review | Preliminary Design Review | Critical Design Review | Critical Design Review | Conceptual Design Phase | Conceptual Design Phase | Preliminary Design Phase | Preliminary Design Phase | Detailed Design Phase | Detailed Design Phase | astrophysics | astrophysics | Stakeholder Analysis | Stakeholder Analysis | System Architecture | System Architecture | Radio Astronomy | Radio Astronomy | Space Telescope | Space Telescope | Interferometry | Interferometry | Lunar Logistics | Lunar Logistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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REDUCCI脫, REUTILITZACI脫 I RECICLATGE EN LA CONSTRUCCI脫 REDUCCI脫, REUTILITZACI脫 I RECICLATGE EN LA CONSTRUCCI脫

Description

La nova tend猫ncia en l'estudi del cicle 貌ptim de vida, les noves especificacions i requeriments mediambientals i les imposicions econ貌miques actuals en el sector de la construccioacute;, fan que en l'actualitat es plantegi la necessitat de minimitzar l'impacte ambiental, de dissenyar per meacute;s enll脿 de la vida uacute;til i d'aplicar nous materials de segona generacioacute; dins de l'脿mbit de la construccioacute;. Per aquestes raons, l'objectiu general del curs eacute;s el d'aportar coneixement referent a com minimitzar (Reduir), de com des-construir (Reutilitzar) i de com usar materials alternatius (Reciclat) d'acord amb l?alineament de l'anomenat Horitzoacute; 2020. Amb el contingut d'aquesta assignatura es preteacute;n donar una resposta coherent a quuml;estions de gr La nova tend猫ncia en l'estudi del cicle 貌ptim de vida, les noves especificacions i requeriments mediambientals i les imposicions econ貌miques actuals en el sector de la construccioacute;, fan que en l'actualitat es plantegi la necessitat de minimitzar l'impacte ambiental, de dissenyar per meacute;s enll脿 de la vida uacute;til i d'aplicar nous materials de segona generacioacute; dins de l'脿mbit de la construccioacute;. Per aquestes raons, l'objectiu general del curs eacute;s el d'aportar coneixement referent a com minimitzar (Reduir), de com des-construir (Reutilitzar) i de com usar materials alternatius (Reciclat) d'acord amb l?alineament de l'anomenat Horitzoacute; 2020. Amb el contingut d'aquesta assignatura es preteacute;n donar una resposta coherent a quuml;estions de gr

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17.554 Political Economy of Latin America (MIT) 17.554 Political Economy of Latin America (MIT)

Description

This class explores the politics of economic reform in Latin America. Topics addressed include: Dependency, Development, and Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism; The Political Consequences of Market-Oriented Reform in Venezuela; The Mexican Peso Crisis; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule in the Southern Cone; Civil-Military Relations; Limits of Democratization; Parties and Elections in Latin America; Religion, Political Mobilization, and Civil Society; and Revolution. This class explores the politics of economic reform in Latin America. Topics addressed include: Dependency, Development, and Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism; The Political Consequences of Market-Oriented Reform in Venezuela; The Mexican Peso Crisis; Transitions from Authoritarian Rule in the Southern Cone; Civil-Military Relations; Limits of Democratization; Parties and Elections in Latin America; Religion, Political Mobilization, and Civil Society; and Revolution.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | history | history | politics | politics | economy | economy | Economic Reform | Economic Reform | Market-Oriented Reform | Market-Oriented Reform | Peso Crisis | Peso Crisis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Library Staff, c1990s

Description

Back Row: Richard Trussell, Chris Doutney, Chris Hunt, ?,?, Frances Shipsey, ?, ?, Caroline Shaw, Bernadette Divall, Chris James, Mike Blatch, Nick Wood, Claire Meredith, Dick Leggot. Second row: Paddy Driscoll, Maureen Wade, Barbara Humphries, ?,?,?, Sue Pollock, Mike McFarlane, ?, Liz Fisher, Rita Halsey, Martin Scarrot, ? Iain Baxter, Graham Camfield, Beverly Brittan, Robin ?, Ken Gibbons, Ann Green, Helen Workman, Ann Davidge. Third row: Brenda ?, Loretta Ramswell, ?, Irene Kiener, ?, ?, June Crutchlow, Cathy Lee , Thalia Knight, Janet Richardson, ?, Fran Ward, Liz Fishman, ?, ?. Front Row: Jill Breen, Shelley Taylor, Sue Donnelly, Demi Nicolaou, Elizabeth McHale, Dawn Thompson, Wendy Butcher, Helen Cuffley, Jill Cooley, Angela Raspin, Ernerst Afriyie IMAGELIBRARY/1177 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

londonschoolofeconomics | lse | lselibrary | cls

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ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT) ESD.172J X PRIZE Workshop: Grand Challenges in Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. In 2004, the Ansari X PRIZE for suborbital spaceflight captured the public's imagination and revolutionized an industry, leveraging a $10M prize purse into over $100M in innovation. Building from that success, the X PRIZE Foundation is now developing new prizes to focus innovation around "Grand Challenge" themes, including genomics, energy, healthcare, and education. This course will examine the intersection of incentives and innovation, drawing on economic models, historic examples, and recent experience of the X PRIZE Foundation to help develop a future prize in Energy Storage Technologies.

Subjects

ESD.172 | ESD.172 | EC.421 | EC.421 | energy | energy | competition | competition | innovation | innovation | incentivize prizes | incentivize prizes | resource allocation | resource allocation | innovation incentives | innovation incentives | Ansari | Ansari | X PRIZE | X PRIZE | economic models of innovation | economic models of innovation | energy storage | energy storage | grid-scale storage | grid-scale storage | prize matrix | prize matrix | genomics | genomics | Archon X PRIZE | Archon X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | Progressive Automotive X PRIZE | grand challenges | grand challenges

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Organic Chemistry 51B. Lecture 22. Conjugation, Resonance, Diels-Alder Reactions, Part 2.

Description

UCI Chem 51B Organic Chemistry (Winter 2013) Lec 22. Organic Chemistry -- Conjugation, Resonance, Diels-Alder Reactions -- Part 2 View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51b_organic_chemistry.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: This is the second quarter of the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds. This video is part of a 26-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Organic Chemistry" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Organic Chemistry (Chem 51B) is part of OpenChem. http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html Recorded March 6, 2013. Index of Topics: 00:13- A molecule today, a barrel tomorrow 00:42- Fracking 04:57- 16.12: The Diels-Alder Reaction 10:42- 16.13: Diene Requires an s-cis conformation 14:53- 16.13: Stereospecificity in the Diels-Alder Reaction 21:08- 16.13: Drawing Bridged Bicyclic Products of Diels-Alder Reactions 29:41- 16.13: The Endo Rule for Cyclic Dienes CHAPTER 17-Benzene and Aromatic Compounds 34:05- 17.1: The C=C pi bonds in benzene exhibit low reactivity 39:19- 17.3: Disubstituted benzene rings: ortho, meta, and para relationships 45:06- 17.4: C NMR Spectroscopy 47:14- 17.4: H NMR Spectroscopy Required attribution: Vranken, David Van. Organic Chemistry 51B (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51b_organic_chemistry.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Kwillt Learning Resource - Keeping warm in later life project

Description

This resource explores factors and barriers influencing older people keeping warm in winter. The research has been funded by a National Institute for Health Research, Research for Patient Benefit grant. The key partners involved include: NHS Rotherham, Sheffield Hallam University, National Energy Action, Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council and Rotherham Older Peoples Experiences of Services.

Subjects

Kwillt | Keeping warm in later life project | learning resource | older | cold | cold home | reflection | pen portraits | Rotherham | Sheffield | Sheffield Hallam University | Yorkshire | National Institute for Health Research | Research for Patient Benefit grant | NHS Rotherham | National Energy Action | Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council | Rotherham Older Peoples Experiences of Services | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | P

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics 131B. Lecture 20. NMR Applications/ Review

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UCI Chem 131B Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics (Winter 2013) Lec 20. Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics -- NMR Applications/Review. View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131b_molecular_structure_and_elementary_statistical_mechanics.html Instructor: Rachel Martin, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Principles of quantum mechanics with application to the elements of atomic structure and energy levels, diatomic molecular spectroscopy and structure determination, and chemical bonding in simple molecules. Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics (Chem 131B) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 26-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics" taught at UC Irvine by Rachel Martin, Ph.D. Recorded on February 27, 2013. Index of Topics: 0:06:48 NMR Applications/Review 0:10:26 Going Through the Process 0:15:59 Sidechain Correlations - TOCSY 0:17:54 Mistic Structure 0:18:59 Relative Sizes of Interactions 0:19:40 Quadrupolar Nuclei 0:25:19 Spin 1 0:27:34 Bicelles: Membrane Mimetics 0:29:39 ^(2)H Spectra 0:31:59 Multiple Lipid Phases 0:35:56 NMR Spectroscopy Worksheet Required attribution: Martin, Rachel. Molecular Structure & Statistical Mechanics 131B (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_131b_molecular_structure_and_elementary_statistical_mechanics.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).

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Anne Bohm and Professor Alan Day, 1988

Description

Exhibition of Richard Robbins pictures at St Johns Smith Square prior to the Lionel Robbins memorial concert Information from LSE Magazine November 1984 No68 p.24 (Retirements) Alan Day came to the School as an Assistant Lecturer ion economics in 1949, after service in the RAF followed by three years at Cambridge. He soon became a leading member of the group of academics gathered round Richard Sayers, from which emerged some of the best contemporary work on monetary institutions both domestic and international. From an early stage the breadth of his interests was evident, and for many years what he wrote in The Observer on Sunday was a major topic for discussion on Monday. These interests took him to the Treasury for two years; to a period as editor of the National Institute Economic Review, and to membership of official committees on the London Taxicab Trade and Local Government Finance, while for many years he has been a member of the Council of the Consumers Association. But perhaps his most abiding interest outside the School was in civil aviation; for three years he was a member of the board of the British Airports Authority and later he became Economic Adviser to the Civil Aviation Authority. In 1979 he was appointed Pro-Director, quite exceptionally he was reappointed for a second term; but to the regret of all his friends and colleagues sudden ill health led to his untimely retirement from the School late in 1983. Since then, his remarkable recovery has enabled him to resume many of his activities; in particular, he is pursuing a life-long interest in restoring old buildings by devoting much of his time to an eighteenth century manor house in Kent. IMAGELIBRARY/297 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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General Chemistry 1C. Lecture 23. Chemical Kinetics Pt. 2.

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UCI Chem 1C General Chemistry (Spring 2013) Lec 23. General Chemistry -- Chemical Kinetics -- Part 2 View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_1c_general_chemistry.html Instructor: Ramesh D. Arasasingham, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: UCI Chem 1C is the third and final quarter of General Chemistry series and covers the following topics: equilibria, aqueous acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, oxidation reduction reactions, electrochemistry; kinetics; special topics. General Chemistry (Chem 1C) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 26-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "General Chemistry" taught at UC Irvine by Ramesh D. Arasasingham, Ph.D. Recorded on May 31, 2013. Index of Topics: 0:00:00 Review on Rates 0:04:02 Kinetic Rate Laws 0:08:57 Example Using N2O5 0:15:53 Determining Rate Law and Order for Reaction 0:28:16 Determing Rate Expression and Value of the Constant 0:42:56 Measuring Rate of Chemical Reaction with Graphs Required attribution: Arasasingham, Ramesh D. Ph.D. General Chemistry 1C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_1c_general_chemistry.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US)

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Professor James Meade, 1993

Description

With restored Phillips Machine Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of 100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/282 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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awphillips | phillips | phillipshydraulicmachine | phillipsmachine | moniacmachine | jamesmeade

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Schwimmer, Rosika Bc.1910

Description

TWL.2000.161Postcard, printed, cardboard, monochrome photographic studio portrait of 'ROSIKA B SCHWIMMER', standing next to a table with three books on it, upper body, front-profile, white border along bottom front edge, black text, printed inscription front: 'MATE OLGA FELVETELE ATELIER OLGA MATE BEDY-SCHWIMMER ROZSA ROSIKA B SCHWIMMER', printed inscription reverse (in four languages): 'INTERNATIONAL WOMAN SUFFRAGE CONGRESS BUDAPEST - HUNGARY', manuscript inscription reverse: 'Rosika Schwimmer Ambassador to USA [United States of America] [Switzerland?] during?'.

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thewomenslibrary | hires

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Professor A.W.H (Bill) Phillips

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Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of 100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/244 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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Department of Social Science and Administration, 1971

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Seated left to right: Muriel Brown, Howard Glennerster, Kit Russell, Roger Hadley, Kay McDougall, Brian Abel-Smith, Richard Titmuss, Garth Plowman, Zofia Butrym, Peter Levin, George Goetschius, Angela Vivian, Don Gregory. Standing left to right: Andrew Howell, Tessa Blackstone, Joan Edmonds, Beata Blair, Ruth Griffiths, Sally Sainsbury, Mike Reddin, Doreen Wilson, Christine Stander, Leone Kellaher, David Piachaud, Vivienne Gilby, Rosalind Brooke, Jackie Shreeve, Anne Edwards, Helen Burns, Judith Benjamin, Maureen Mulvany, Dianna Wories, Charlotte Sutton, Kathleen Hill, Janie Thomas, Roberta Gillingwater, Irmi Elkan, Geoffrey Sage IMAGELIBRARY/234 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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Fairmount Avenue Methodist Church, Richmond, Va

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Description: Fairmount Avenue Methodist Church, Fairmount Avenue and 20ths St., Richmond, Va. Organized April 1889 in a chapel at Stewart and Redd Sts., with 23 members, then known as Howard's Grove Methodist Church. In 1892 a new church was erected at the present location and name changed to Fairmount Avenue. The first preacher in charge was Rev. LeRoy J. Phaup who was appointed by the Va. M.E. Conference in November 1899. 14th appointment in 1912 Rev. E.V Carson. Present building erected 1913-14. Manufacturer: Southern Bargain House, Richmond, Va. Date Postmarked: 1920 Rights: This item is in the public domain. Acknowledgement of the Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries as a source is requested. Reference URL: dig.library.vcu.edu/u?/postcard,118 Collection: Rarely Seen Richmond: Early twentieth century Richmond as seen through vintage postcards

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Professor James Meade with Phillips Machine, 1996

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Professor of Commerce at LSE 1947-1957, received the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (jointly) in 1977 Extracts from ?The Phillips Machine Project? by Nicholas Bar, LSE Magazine, June 1988, No75, p.3 A.W. H. ?Bill? Phillips is known worldwide as the originator of the Phillips Curve. Less well known is the remarkable man he was personally, and his extraordinary route to academic prominence via what came to be called the Phillips Machine. Trained as an electrical engineer in his native New Zealand in the 1930s, he caught the travel bug and took up an engineering job in the Australian outback, where he also earned money by running a cinema and hunting crocodiles. He reached London in 1938 via the Trans-Siberian railway and joined the RAF at the outbreak of war. He was captured in Java and spent most of the war in a Japanese POW camp, where he learned Chinese and some Russian from fellow prisoners. Back in Britain he took the BSc (Econ) 1946-49, special subject sociology. He developed a great interest in economics?and like many of his generation, became very caught up with Keynesian theory. Though fascinated he found the Keynesian model hard going. With Walter Newlyn (an undergraduate contemporary, later Professor of Economics at Leeds University) to help with the economic theory, he fell back on his engineering training. He saw that money stocks could be represented as tanks of water, and monetary flows by water circulating round plastic tubes. With a grant of 100 (obtained with Newlyn?s help) he spent the summer of 1949 in a garage in Croydon ?living on air? as James Meade was later to put it, working on a hydraulic representation of the Keynesian model. In the machine he constructed, the circular flow of income was represented by water being pumped round a series of clear plastic tubes, with outflows representing savings, taxes and imports, and inflows representing investment, government spending and exports. The model had three tanks representing the stock of money, one for transaction balances and one for foreign-held sterling balances. The whole system determined the level of income, the rate of interest, imports, exports and the exchange to an accuracy (astonishing at the time) of +two per cent. The time path of income and the other variables was traced out by plotter pens making it possible to analyse the quantitative effects of economic policy. The machine, in the jargon, was a hydraulic representation of an open economy IS-LM model with an explicit underlying dynamic structure. It was this very Heath Robinson prototype which, with the enthusiastic support of James Meade (then Professor of Commerce at the School), Phillips demonstrated to Lionel Robbins? seminar in November 1949. Those attending gazed in wonder at this large (7ft high x 5ft wide x 3ft deep) ?thing? in the middle of the room. Phillips, chain smoking, paced back and forth explaining it in a heavy New Zealand drawl, in the process giving one of the best lectures on Keynes that anyone in the audience had ever heard. Then he switched the machine on. And it worked! According to Lord Robbins? recollections, ?there was income dividing itself into consumption and saving?Keynes and Robertson need never have quarrelled if they had had the Phillips Machine before them??Phillips was made an Assistant Lecturer in Economics in 1950, Lecturer 1951, Reader 1954, and Tooke Professor of Economic Science and Statistics in 1958 (the year his Phillips Curve paper was published). He took up a Chair at the Australian National University in 1967 and, having suffered a major stroke, retired to Auckland in 1970, where he died five years later aged 60, mourned by many friends for personal as much for professional reasons.? IMAGELIBRARY/724 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

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lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | awphillips | phillips | phillipsmachine | phillipshydraulicmachine | moniacmachine | jamesmeade

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Anthony Russell

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Name: Anthony Russell Arrested for: Larceny Arrested at: North Shields Police Station Arrested on: 27 May 1904 Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-29-Anthony Russell For an image of Russell's accomplice, Robert Lightly see www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/19140868465/in/dateposted/. The Shields Daily Gazette for 28 May 1904 reports: ?TWO MINERS HAVE A NIGHT OUT. FRACAS ON A NO. SHIELDS FARM At North Shields Anthony Russell (27) and Robert Lightly (24), pitmen, Percy Main, were charged with being concerned together in stealing a duck, value 10s, the property of Mr Elwin on the 22nd inst. Joseph Elwin said that at 4.25 am he was awakened by his father, who told him that he had heard three shots fired. He got up and looked out of the window, and saw two men, each carrying a gun, on the field of the farm. He went out with another lad, and on getting up to men he saw that one was carrying a bundle, from which he saw a hare?s head protruding. He asked him why he had shot the hare on his father?s land. They made no reply and walked away. He then gave information to the police. On getting back to the farm he missed a duck. An officer spoke to arresting the defendants and charged them with stealing a duck. Lightly replied that Russell shot the duck and took it away. Russell replied that he burnt it. Mr Duncan, for the defence, said that there was no doubt they shot the duck, but it was not with a felonious intent. It appeared that on the Saturday night they had taken too much drink, and on the Sunday morning they got up at four o?clock and took their guns into the fields. Russell had seen a duck and the temptation had been too strong, and he had shot it. The Bench committed both defendants to prison for 14 days. The prisoners were afterwards charged with threatening Joseph Elwin. The prosecutor said that when he accused the two men of trespassing on the farm they both threatened to shoot him if he did not get out of their way. Lightly said that he would drill rabbit holes into him. Mr Duncan, for the defendants, denied the charges, and stated that Elwin challenged the men to fight. The defendants both denied the charge on oath. They were both bound over in the sum of 10 in their own recognisances and sureties of 10 each, or in default committed for 14 days; they were also ordered to pay the costs for both sides or in default go to prison for seven days. The defendant Lightly was charged with assaulting Elwin by striking him in the chest with his fist and with the muzzle end of the gun. The defendants were next charged with trespassing in search of game at Chirton Hill Farm on the same date. Mr Duncan submitted that the defendants had already been sufficiently punished for their offence, and the summons for trespass ought to be withdrawn, especially as it was taken out against the wish of Mr Elwin. The Chief Constable contradicted the latter statement. Mr Duncan said that Mr Elwin had stated in Court that he did not wish the case to proceed and therefore the summons could not stand. The Chief Constable sad that he himself was the informant in the case and he intended to go on with it. Mr Duncan took the ruling of the Court on the point, and Mr Kidd decided that the Chief Constable was acting within his rights. After hearing the evidence, the magistrates fined defendants 10s and costs or in default 14 days imprisonment to run concurrently with the other commitments?. These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne & Wear Archives (TWA ref DX1388/1). (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

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prisoner | crime | criminal | northshields | northtyneside | policestation | mugshot | imprisoned | cap | miner | larceny | theft | percymain | duck | gun

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