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Heritage case studies: Scotland Heritage case studies: Scotland

Description

The heritage traditions of Scotland are unique in comparison to the rest of Britain. This free course, Heritage case studies: Scotland, uses two case studies to demonstrate how heritage sites have helped to forge the Scottish national identity and history. First published on Mon, 11 Jan 2016 as Heritage case studies: Scotland. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The heritage traditions of Scotland are unique in comparison to the rest of Britain. This free course, Heritage case studies: Scotland, uses two case studies to demonstrate how heritage sites have helped to forge the Scottish national identity and history. First published on Mon, 11 Jan 2016 as Heritage case studies: Scotland. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Heritage | Heritage | Scotland | Scotland | A180_1 | A180_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | Planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.812 Marketing Management (MIT) 15.812 Marketing Management (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously). This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously).

Subjects

marketing | marketing | customer | customer | segmenting | segmenting | market research | market research | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | advertising | advertising | ethics | ethics | competition | competition | pricing | pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

License

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6.033 Computer System Engineering (SMA 5501) (MIT) 6.033 Computer System Engineering (SMA 5501) (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. We will also look at case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts, and do two design projects. Students engage in extensive written communication exercises. Enrollment may be limited. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5501 (Computer System Engineering). This course covers topics on the engineering of computer software and hardware systems: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; recovery and reliability; privacy, security, and encryption; and impact of computer systems on society. We will also look at case studies of working systems and readings from the current literature provide comparisons and contrasts, and do two design projects. Students engage in extensive written communication exercises. Enrollment may be limited. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5501 (Computer System Engineering).

Subjects

computer software | computer software | hardware systems | hardware systems | controlling complexity | controlling complexity | strong modularity | strong modularity | client-server design | client-server design | virtual memory | virtual memory | threads | threads | networks | networks | atomicity | atomicity | coordination | coordination | parallel activities | parallel activities | recovery | recovery | reliability | reliability | privacy | privacy | security | security | encryption | encryption | impact on society | impact on society | computer systems | computer systems | case studies | case studies

License

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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT) 11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)

Description

The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discussions to assist students in becoming mindful of the potential and pitfalls of comparative analysis, the types of data, the methods of analysis, and the urban issues or sectors which may benefit the most from such approaches. The course is designed to be interdisciplinary and interactive, and

Subjects

urban studies | urban studies | first third | first third | world | world | comparison | comparison | city | city | globalization | globalization | multicultural | multicultural | qualitative methods | qualitative methods | quantitative methods | quantitative methods | cultural analysis | cultural analysis | urban | urban | comparative case studies | comparative case studies | policy | policy

License

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21A.100 Introduction to Anthropology (MIT) 21A.100 Introduction to Anthropology (MIT)

Description

This class introduces students to the methods and perspectives of cultural anthropology. Readings emphasize case studies in very different settings (a nuclear weapons laboratory, a cattle-herding society of the Sudan, and a Jewish elder center in Los Angeles). Although some of the results and conclusions of anthropology will be discussed, emphasis will be on appreciating cultural difference and its implications, studying cultures and societies through long-term fieldwork, and most of all, learning to think analytically about other people's lives and our own. This class introduces students to the methods and perspectives of cultural anthropology. Readings emphasize case studies in very different settings (a nuclear weapons laboratory, a cattle-herding society of the Sudan, and a Jewish elder center in Los Angeles). Although some of the results and conclusions of anthropology will be discussed, emphasis will be on appreciating cultural difference and its implications, studying cultures and societies through long-term fieldwork, and most of all, learning to think analytically about other people's lives and our own.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | methods | methods | culture | culture | case studies | case studies | nuclear weapons laboratory | nuclear weapons laboratory | cattle-herding | cattle-herding | society | society | Sudan | Sudan | Jewish elder center | Jewish elder center | Los Angeles | Los Angeles | cultural difference | cultural difference | fieldwork | fieldwork

License

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe. This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it evaluates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning | planning | water supply | water supply | sanitation | sanitation | developing countries | developing countries | sanitation technologies | sanitation technologies | service pricing | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | alternative institutional structures | privatization | privatization | consumer demand | consumer demand | community participation | community participation | planning processes | planning processes | environmental health | environmental health | public health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | low-income households | case studies | case studies | policy memos | policy memos | journals | journals | environment | environment | sustainability | sustainability | pollution | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.812 Marketing Management (MIT) 15.812 Marketing Management (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously). This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously).

Subjects

marketing | marketing | customer | customer | segmenting | segmenting | market research | market research | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | advertising | advertising | ethics | ethics | competition | competition | pricing | pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

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EC.S11 Engineering Capacity in Community-Based Healthcare (MIT) EC.S11 Engineering Capacity in Community-Based Healthcare (MIT)

Description

This multidisciplinary seminar addresses fundamental issues in global health faced by community-based healthcare programs in developing countries. Students will broadly explore topics with expert lecturers and guided readings. Topics will be further illuminated with case studies from healthcare programs in urban centers of Zambia. Multidisciplinary teams will be formed to develop feasible solutions to specific health challenges posed in the case studies and encouraged to pursue their ideas beyond the seminar. Possible global health topics include community-based AIDS/HIV management, maternity care, health diagnostics, and information technology in patient management and tracking. Students from Medicine, Public Health, Engineering, Management, and Social Sciences are encouraged to enroll. N This multidisciplinary seminar addresses fundamental issues in global health faced by community-based healthcare programs in developing countries. Students will broadly explore topics with expert lecturers and guided readings. Topics will be further illuminated with case studies from healthcare programs in urban centers of Zambia. Multidisciplinary teams will be formed to develop feasible solutions to specific health challenges posed in the case studies and encouraged to pursue their ideas beyond the seminar. Possible global health topics include community-based AIDS/HIV management, maternity care, health diagnostics, and information technology in patient management and tracking. Students from Medicine, Public Health, Engineering, Management, and Social Sciences are encouraged to enroll. N

Subjects

developing country | developing country | Africa | Africa | Zambia | Zambia | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | ART | ART | public health | public health | health policy | health policy | NGO | NGO | disease | disease | sex | sex | antiretroviral | antiretroviral | VCT | VCT | counseling | counseling | community | community | CD4 | CD4 | WHO | WHO

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.874 System Dynamics for Business Policy (MIT) 15.874 System Dynamics for Business Policy (MIT)

Description

15.874 and 15.871 provide an introduction to system dynamics modeling for the analysis of business policy and strategy. Students learn to visualize a business organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The course uses role playing games, simulation models, and management flight simulators to develop principles for the successful management of complex strategies. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies of successful strategies using system dynamics. 15.874 is a full semester course and 15.871 is a half semester course. The two classes meet together and cover the same material for the first half of the term. In the second half of the semester, only 15.874 continues. 15.874 and 15.871 provide an introduction to system dynamics modeling for the analysis of business policy and strategy. Students learn to visualize a business organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The course uses role playing games, simulation models, and management flight simulators to develop principles for the successful management of complex strategies. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies of successful strategies using system dynamics. 15.874 is a full semester course and 15.871 is a half semester course. The two classes meet together and cover the same material for the first half of the term. In the second half of the semester, only 15.874 continues.

Subjects

system dynamics modeling applied to corporate strategy | system dynamics modeling applied to corporate strategy | simulation models | simulation models | quot; | quot; | management "flight simulators" | management "flight simulators" | high-performance organizations | high-performance organizations | growth strategy | growth strategy | management of technology | management of technology | operations | operations | project management | project management | effective use of modeling in the real world | effective use of modeling in the real world | business strategy | business strategy | system dynamics modeling | system dynamics modeling | corporate strategy | corporate strategy | case studies | case studies | business policies | business policies | visualizations | visualizations | business structures | business structures | microworlds | microworlds | role playing games | role playing games | policy design | policy design

License

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1.782 Environmental Engineering Masters of Engineering Project (MIT) 1.782 Environmental Engineering Masters of Engineering Project (MIT)

Description

This class is one of the core requirements for the Environmental Masters of Engineering program. It is designed to teach about environmental engineering through the use of case studies, computer software tools, and seminars from industrial experts. Case studies provide the basis for group projects as well as individual theses. Past case studies have included the MMR Superfund site on Cape Cod; restoration of the Florida Everglades; dredging of Boston Harbor; local watershed trading programs; appropriate wastewater treatment technology for Brazil; point-of-use water treatment for Nepal, Brownfields Development in Providence, RI, and water resource planning for the island of Cyprus. This class spans the entire academic year: students must register for the Fall term, IAP, and the Spring term. This class is one of the core requirements for the Environmental Masters of Engineering program. It is designed to teach about environmental engineering through the use of case studies, computer software tools, and seminars from industrial experts. Case studies provide the basis for group projects as well as individual theses. Past case studies have included the MMR Superfund site on Cape Cod; restoration of the Florida Everglades; dredging of Boston Harbor; local watershed trading programs; appropriate wastewater treatment technology for Brazil; point-of-use water treatment for Nepal, Brownfields Development in Providence, RI, and water resource planning for the island of Cyprus. This class spans the entire academic year: students must register for the Fall term, IAP, and the Spring term.

Subjects

civil engineering; environmental engineering; professional practice; methodology; thesis; proposal; yonder; geotechnical data; water treatment; aquifer; groundwater; hydrology; Chattahoochee; Tennessee; US Virgin Islands; pollution; contaminants; drinking water | civil engineering; environmental engineering; professional practice; methodology; thesis; proposal; yonder; geotechnical data; water treatment; aquifer; groundwater; hydrology; Chattahoochee; Tennessee; US Virgin Islands; pollution; contaminants; drinking water | civil engineering | civil engineering | environmental engineering | environmental engineering | professional practice | professional practice | methodology | methodology | thesis | thesis | proposal | proposal | yonder | yonder | geotechnical data | geotechnical data | water treatment | water treatment | aquifer | aquifer | groundwater | groundwater | hydrology | hydrology | Chattahoochee | Chattahoochee | Tennessee | Tennessee | US Virgin Islands | US Virgin Islands | pollution | pollution | contaminants | contaminants | drinking water | drinking water

License

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15.812 Marketing Management (MIT) 15.812 Marketing Management (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously). This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously).

Subjects

marketing | marketing | customer | customer | segmenting | segmenting | market research | market research | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | advertising | advertising | ethics | ethics | competition | competition | pricing | pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.225J Transportation Flow Systems (MIT) 1.225J Transportation Flow Systems (MIT)

Description

Design, operation, and management of traffic flows over complex transportation networks are the foci of this course. It covers two major topics: traffic flow modeling and traffic flow operations. Sub-topics include deterministic and probabilistic models, elements of queuing theory, and traffic assignment. Concepts are illustrated through various applications and case studies. This is a half-term subject offered during the second half of the semester. Design, operation, and management of traffic flows over complex transportation networks are the foci of this course. It covers two major topics: traffic flow modeling and traffic flow operations. Sub-topics include deterministic and probabilistic models, elements of queuing theory, and traffic assignment. Concepts are illustrated through various applications and case studies. This is a half-term subject offered during the second half of the semester.

Subjects

transportation | transportation | transportation flow systems | transportation flow systems | traffic | traffic | traffic flow | traffic flow | networks | networks | transportation networks | transportation networks | flow modeling | flow modeling | flow operations | flow operations | deteministic models | deteministic models | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | queuing theory | queuing theory | queues | queues | traffic assignment | traffic assignment | case studies | case studies | cumulative plots | cumulative plots | airport runway capacity | airport runway capacity | runway capacity | runway capacity | road traffic | road traffic | shortest paths | shortest paths | optimizations | optimizations | highway control | highway control | ramp metering | ramp metering | simulation models | simulation models | isolated signals | isolated signals | operations | operations | operational problems | operational problems | air traffic operation | air traffic operation | air | air | road | road | component | component | 1.225 | 1.225 | ESD.205 | ESD.205

License

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15.872 System Dynamics II (MIT) 15.872 System Dynamics II (MIT)

Description

15.872 is a continuation of 15.871 Introduction to System Dynamics. It emphasizes tools and methods needed to apply systems thinking and simulation modeling successfully in complex real-world settings. The course uses simulation models, management flight simulators and case studies to deepen the conceptual and modeling skills introduced in 15.871. Through models and case studies of successful applications, students learn how to use qualitative and quantitative data to formulate and test models, and how to work effectively with senior executives to implement change successfully. 15.872 is a prerequisite for further work in the field. 15.872 is a continuation of 15.871 Introduction to System Dynamics. It emphasizes tools and methods needed to apply systems thinking and simulation modeling successfully in complex real-world settings. The course uses simulation models, management flight simulators and case studies to deepen the conceptual and modeling skills introduced in 15.871. Through models and case studies of successful applications, students learn how to use qualitative and quantitative data to formulate and test models, and how to work effectively with senior executives to implement change successfully. 15.872 is a prerequisite for further work in the field.

Subjects

system dynamics business systems | system dynamics business systems | simulation models | simulation models | modeling software | modeling software | managing instability | managing instability | Bullwhip effect | Bullwhip effect | policy issues | policy issues | project management | project management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.990 Architecture and Communication in Organizations (MIT) 15.990 Architecture and Communication in Organizations (MIT)

Description

While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation to business needs. The course presents conceptual frameworks for thinking about architecture, communication and organizations. This course is offered during the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP), which is a one-week period at the MIT Sloan School of Management that occurs midway through each semester. While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation to business needs. The course presents conceptual frameworks for thinking about architecture, communication and organizations. This course is offered during the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP), which is a one-week period at the MIT Sloan School of Management that occurs midway through each semester.

Subjects

using space | using space | space design for business | space design for business | space planning | space planning | office buildings | office buildings | architectural design | architectural design | business communication | business communication | distributed work | distributed work | workplace design | workplace design | work stations | work stations | communication | communication | team work | team work | architecture of knowledge | architecture of knowledge | offices | offices | cubicles | cubicles | space design | space design | office space | office space | spatial relationships | spatial relationships | live case studies | live case studies | architects | architects | managers | managers | strategic space planning | strategic space planning | organizations | organizations | knowledge architecture | knowledge architecture | architecture | architecture | business administration | business administration | management | management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.872 System Dynamics II (MIT) 15.872 System Dynamics II (MIT)

Description

Continuation of 15.871, emphasizing tools and methods needed to apply systems thinking and simulation modeling successfully in complex real-world settings. Uses simulation models, management flight simulators, and case studies to deepen the conceptual and modeling skills introduced in 15.871. Through models and case studies of successful applications students learn how to use qualitative and quantitative data to formulate and test models, and how to work effectively with senior executives to implement change successfully. Continuation of 15.871, emphasizing tools and methods needed to apply systems thinking and simulation modeling successfully in complex real-world settings. Uses simulation models, management flight simulators, and case studies to deepen the conceptual and modeling skills introduced in 15.871. Through models and case studies of successful applications students learn how to use qualitative and quantitative data to formulate and test models, and how to work effectively with senior executives to implement change successfully.

Subjects

system dynamics | system dynamics | systems thinking | systems thinking | models | models | business dynamics | business dynamics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.878 Qualitative Research: Design and Methods (MIT) 17.878 Qualitative Research: Design and Methods (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores the development and application of qualitative research designs and methods in political analysis. It considers a broad array of approaches, from exploratory narratives to focused-comparison case studies, for investigating plausible alternative hypotheses. The focus is on analysis, not data collection. This seminar explores the development and application of qualitative research designs and methods in political analysis. It considers a broad array of approaches, from exploratory narratives to focused-comparison case studies, for investigating plausible alternative hypotheses. The focus is on analysis, not data collection.

Subjects

development and application of qualitative research designs and methods in political analysis | development and application of qualitative research designs and methods in political analysis | exploratory narrative | exploratory narrative | focused-comparison case studies | focused-comparison case studies | investigating plausible alternative hypotheses | investigating plausible alternative hypotheses | research methods | research methods | methodology | methodology | rival hypothesis | rival hypothesis | research designs | research designs | plausibility | plausibility | political analysis | political analysis | data analysis | data analysis | validity | validity | reliability | reliability | inference | inference | observations | observations | cases | cases | subjects | subjects | research agenda | research agenda | qualitative methods | qualitative methods | qualitative research | qualitative research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.432 Causes of War: Theory and Method (MIT) 17.432 Causes of War: Theory and Method (MIT)

Description

This course explores the causes of modern war with a focus on preventable causes. Course readings cover theoretical, historical, and methodological topics. Major theories of war are explored and assessed in the first few weeks of the class, asking at each stage "are these good theories?" and "how could they be tested?" Basic social scientific inference -- what are theories? What are good theories? How should theories be framed and tested? -- and case study methodology are also discussed. The second half of the course explores the history of the outbreak of some major wars. We use these cases as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?" This course explores the causes of modern war with a focus on preventable causes. Course readings cover theoretical, historical, and methodological topics. Major theories of war are explored and assessed in the first few weeks of the class, asking at each stage "are these good theories?" and "how could they be tested?" Basic social scientific inference -- what are theories? What are good theories? How should theories be framed and tested? -- and case study methodology are also discussed. The second half of the course explores the history of the outbreak of some major wars. We use these cases as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | war | war | preventable causes | preventable causes | theoretical | theoretical | historical | historical | methodological | methodological | topics | topics | social scientific inference | social scientific inference | history | history | outbreak | outbreak | causes | causes | method. | method. | method | method

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.812 Marketing Management (MIT) 15.812 Marketing Management (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously). This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously).

Subjects

marketing | marketing | customer | customer | segmenting | segmenting | market research | market research | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | advertising | advertising | ethics | ethics | competition | competition | pricing | pricing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sustainability: the business perspective Sustainability: the business perspective

Description

The primary aim of this unit is to capture this transition and define what businesses are doing to adopt a more sustainable approach. Looking at a number of case studies, the unit will attempt to demonstrate how individual businesses are attempting to align their activities to address global sustainability challenges such as climate change and carbon reduction, energy and water scarcity and poverty reduction. The primary aim of this unit is to capture this transition and define what businesses are doing to adopt a more sustainable approach. Looking at a number of case studies, the unit will attempt to demonstrate how individual businesses are attempting to align their activities to address global sustainability challenges such as climate change and carbon reduction, energy and water scarcity and poverty reduction. There is growing recognition across business that the reductionist ‘mind set’ founded on unlimited economic growth impervious to the social and environmental impacts of commercial activities will not resolve the converging environmental, social and economic crises now faced by the global community. Ever greater numbers of Boards and CEOs are grappling with a notion of sustainability and attempting to define precisely what it means for their business. The primary aim of this unit is to capture this transition and define what businesses are doing to adopt a more sustainable approach. Looking at a number of case studies, the unit will attempt to demonstrate how individual businesses are attempting to align their activities to address global sustainability challenges such as climate chang There is growing recognition across business that the reductionist ‘mind set’ founded on unlimited economic growth impervious to the social and environmental impacts of commercial activities will not resolve the converging environmental, social and economic crises now faced by the global community. Ever greater numbers of Boards and CEOs are grappling with a notion of sustainability and attempting to define precisely what it means for their business. The primary aim of this unit is to capture this transition and define what businesses are doing to adopt a more sustainable approach. Looking at a number of case studies, the unit will attempt to demonstrate how individual businesses are attempting to align their activities to address global sustainability challenges such as climate chang

Subjects

UNow | UNow | UKOER | UKOER | Nottingham | Nottingham | Sustainability | Sustainability | Business | Business

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Using Social Policy Research in Teaching

Description

A collection of six case studies on 'Using Social Policy Research in Teaching' conducted in 2007. It is hoped that the six case studies will stimulate thinking and ideas for integrating research into teaching and learning activities. The case studies represent a snapshot of the tools and techniques employed by lecturers in social policy to illuminate their own and others' research within their teaching in ways that enhance students' learning experiences and equip them to become research minded and research active. They also show how engagement with what might be seen as 'dry' or 'difficult' policy can be highly enjoyable as well as rewarding.

Subjects

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11.479 Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Planning in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course examines the policy and planning for the provision of water supply and sanitation services in developing countries. It reviews available technologies, but emphasizes the planning and policy process, including economic, social, environmental, and health issues. The course incorporates considerations of financing, pricing, institutional structure, consumer demand, and community participation in the planning process. And it valuates policies and projects in case studies from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Subjects

planning; water supply; sanitation; developing countries; sanitation technologies; service pricing; alternative institutional structures; privatization; consumer demand; community participation; planning processes; environmental health; public health; water supply and sanitation planning; low-income households; case studies; policy memos; journals; environment; sustainability; pollution | Planning | water supply | sanitation | developing countries | sanitation technologies | service pricing | alternative institutional structures | privatization | consumer demand | community participation | planning processes | environmental health | public health | water supply and sanitation planning | low-income households | case studies | policy memos | journals | environment | sustainability | pollution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to research data management - case studies

Description

Three research data management case studies (one each from the humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences), presented as slideshows. Based on information given by real researchers, these are designed to provide concrete examples of a number of aspects of data management practice. The slideshows are part of a set of resources created by the Jisc-funded DaMaRO Project at the University of Oxford. They can be used in conjunction with the DaMaRO Project's half-day Introduction to Research Data Management course materials, to provide discipline-specific examples, or as a standalone resource to trigger discussion.

Subjects

researchers | postgraduate research students | postdoctoral researchers | research data | research data management | case studies | examples | data storage | backing up | file naming | metadata | data sharing | data preservation

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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