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Earth System Science 21. On Thin Ice. Lecture 04. Earth's climates

Description

UCI ESS 21: On Thin Ice (Winter 2014) Lec 04. On Thin Ice -- Earth's Climate -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html Instructor: Julie Ferguson, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In recent decades we have observed a significant reduction of the cryosphere due to anthropogenic climate change. The observed and predicted changes in the extent and amount of snow and ice will have major impacts on climate, ecosystems and human populations both at a local and global scale. This course will introduce students to the science behind climate change as well as the physical and chemical processes that govern components of the cryosphere, including snow, permafrost, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the important role that each component plays in the larger climate system and potential feedbacks. We will also examine some of the social, economic and political impacts that the melting cryosphere will have on countries around the Arctic and also worldwide, such as access to new petroleum reserves, infrastructure damage due to melting permafrost, sea level rise and decreases in freshwater availability. Recorded on January 13, 2014. Required attribution: Ferguson, Julie. On Thin Ice 21 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US).

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Earth System Science 21. On Thin Ice. Lecture 05. Anthropogenic Climate Change

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UCI ESS 21: On Thin Ice (Winter 2014) Lec 05. On Thin Ice -- Anthropogenic Climate Change -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html Instructor: Julie Ferguson, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In recent decades we have observed a significant reduction of the cryosphere due to anthropogenic climate change. The observed and predicted changes in the extent and amount of snow and ice will have major impacts on climate, ecosystems and human populations both at a local and global scale. This course will introduce students to the science behind climate change as well as the physical and chemical processes that govern components of the cryosphere, including snow, permafrost, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the important role that each component plays in the larger climate system and potential feedbacks. We will also examine some of the social, economic and political impacts that the melting cryosphere will have on countries around the Arctic and also worldwide, such as access to new petroleum reserves, infrastructure damage due to melting permafrost, sea level rise and decreases in freshwater availability. Recorded on January 15, 2014. Required attribution: Ferguson, Julie. On Thin Ice 21 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US).

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Earth System Science 21. On Thin Ice. Lecture 06. Future Climate Change

Description

UCI ESS 21: On Thin Ice (Winter 2014) Lec 06. On Thin Ice -- Future Climate Change -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html Instructor: Julie Ferguson, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: In recent decades we have observed a significant reduction of the cryosphere due to anthropogenic climate change. The observed and predicted changes in the extent and amount of snow and ice will have major impacts on climate, ecosystems and human populations both at a local and global scale. This course will introduce students to the science behind climate change as well as the physical and chemical processes that govern components of the cryosphere, including snow, permafrost, sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. Particular emphasis will be placed on the important role that each component plays in the larger climate system and potential feedbacks. We will also examine some of the social, economic and political impacts that the melting cryosphere will have on countries around the Arctic and also worldwide, such as access to new petroleum reserves, infrastructure damage due to melting permafrost, sea level rise and decreases in freshwater availability. Recorded on January 17, 2014. Required attribution: Ferguson, Julie. On Thin Ice 21 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/ess_21_on_thin_ice__climate_change_and_the_cryosphere.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. (creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US).

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Managing coastal environments Managing coastal environments

Description

Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there. First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as Managing coastal environments. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there. First published on Wed, 27 Jul 2011 as Managing coastal environments. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | Coast | Coast | climate change | climate change | conservation | conservation | U216_1 | U216_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Long-period temperature records in the British Isles

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Prof Chris Folland, University of East Anglia and Met Office Hadley Centre, gives a talk as part of the Met Office award for 200 years of continuous weather observations at Oxford ceremony on 15th May 2015. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate change | Environment | temperature | MET office | weather | climate change | Environment | temperature | MET office | weather | 2015-05-15

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s Devolved Administrations part one

Description

Jack Snape, Committee on Climate Change gives a talk for the Transport Studies Unit Hilary Term Seminar Series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

transport | TSU | low-carbon | climate change | politics | transport | TSU | low-carbon | climate change | politics

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Sands of Time: A Google Earth Approach to Climate Change Education

Description

This e-publication provides a case study that employs Google Earth in examining climate change impacts and sustainable development issues in North Africa.

Subjects

geography | earth sciences | climate change | desertification | sustainable development | adaptation | mitigation | blended learning | ukoer | geesoer | north africa | google earth | mauritania | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Coastal systems: climate change, coral islands and sea-level rise

Description

YouTube presentation

Subjects

geography | climate change | beaches | sea-level rise | coral islands | pacific | earth sciences | environmental sciences | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Environment. Treading lightly on the Earth

Description

This unit focuses on the problem of green-house gas emissions, especially carbon dioxide, and explore what you can do to lighten those emissions to help reduce the rate of climate change.

Subjects

geesoer ukoer climate change greenhouse gases | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Environmental Change Institute

Description

These online audio resources consist of lectures, seminars and interviews from the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford University. Topics include: climate change, energy, tropical forestry, environmental governance and general topics related to environmental change.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | climate change | media | copenhagen | environmental change institute | reuters institute | oxford university | checked1 | he - social studies | f850 | c180 | p500 | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Local Authorities

Description

Laurie Newton talks about the need for local authorities to adapt to climate change and some of the resources which are available to help Local Authorities understand adaptation

Subjects

ukcip | climate change | adaptation | mitigation | climate impacts program | local authorities | f800 | c180 | f810 | f860 | ukoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Environmental citizenship

Description

Exercise looking at climate change and our impact on the environment. There are tasks focusing on ways we can reduce our carbon footprint and the work of environmental campaign groups. Includes links to related websites and carbon calculators and suggestions for teachers on using this resource.

Subjects

global warming | climate change | environment | carbon footprint | campaigning | Social studies | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | UK EL10 = SCQF 10 | Honours degree | Graduate diploma | L000 | E

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared. This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

carbon cycle | carbon cycle | isotopic analysis | isotopic analysis | geobiochemistry | geobiochemistry | climate | climate | climate change | climate change | Snowball earth | Snowball earth | mesozoic | mesozoic | proterozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | antiquity of life | carbon dating | carbon dating | origin of life | origin of life | phylogenic trees | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.009J Theoretical Environmental Analysis (MIT) 12.009J Theoretical Environmental Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes cooperative processes that shape the natural environment, now and in the geologic past. It emphasizes the development of theoretical models that relate the physical and biological worlds, the comparison of theory to observational data, and associated mathematical methods. This course analyzes cooperative processes that shape the natural environment, now and in the geologic past. It emphasizes the development of theoretical models that relate the physical and biological worlds, the comparison of theory to observational data, and associated mathematical methods.

Subjects

natural environment | natural environment | carbon cycle dynamics | carbon cycle dynamics | ecosystem structure | ecosystem structure | stability and complexity | stability and complexity | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | biosphere-geosphere coevolution | biosphere-geosphere coevolution | climate change | climate change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.009 Theoretical Environmental Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes cooperative processes that shape the natural environment, now and in the geologic past. It emphasizes the development of theoretical models that relate the physical and biological worlds, the comparison of theory to observational data, and associated mathematical methods. Topics include carbon cycle dynamics; ecosystem structure, stability and complexity; mass extinctions; biosphere-geosphere coevolution; and climate change. Employs techniques such as stability analysis; scaling; null model construction; time series and network analysis.

Subjects

natural environment | carbon cycle dynamics | ecosystem structure | stability and complexity | mass extinctions | biosphere-geosphere coevolution | climate change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Groundwater Groundwater

Description

Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many reas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Groundwater is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many reas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Groundwater is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Groundwater. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Energy resources: Water quality Energy resources: Water quality

Description

Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Energy resources: Water quality is a free course that helps explain the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there are areas where water supplies are limited, shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enough water to support the current population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Energy resources: Water quality is a free course that helps explain the options. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Water quality. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | water | water | pollution | pollution

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Surface water Surface water

Description

Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there area areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enought water to support the currently population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Surface water is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Surface water. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. In the UK there area areas where water supplies are limited, as shown by recent droughts. Globally, there are many areas that do not have enought water to support the currently population adequately. Decisions will have to be made on the best way to use water in a world where there is climate change. Surface water is a free course that helps you examines the options. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Surface water. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: Biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. Introduces the concept of "life as a geological agent" and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. Topics include the origin of the solar system and the early Earth atmosphere; the origin and evolution of life and its influence on climate up through and including the modern age and the problem of global warming; the global carbon cycle; and astrobiology.

Subjects

Big Bang | carbon cycle | geobiochemistry | Solar System formation | evolution | isotopic analysis: climate | climate change | Snowball earth | mesozoic | proterozoic | mass extinctions | paleoclimate | antiquity of life | carbon dating | origin of life | phylogenic trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.301 Climate Physics and Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to climate studies, including beginnings of the solar system, time scales, and climate in human history; methods for detecting climate change, including proxies, ice cores, instrumental records, and time series analysis; physical and chemical processes in climate, including primordial atmosphere, ozone chemistry, carbon and oxygen cycles, and heat and water budgets; internal feedback mechanisms, including ice, aerosols, water vapor, clouds, and ocean circulation; climate forcing, including orbital variations, volcanism, plate tectonics, and solar variability; climate models and mechanisms of variability, including energy balance, coupled models, and global ocean and atmosphere models; and outstanding problems.

Subjects

climate | climate change | proxies | ice cores | primordial atmosphere | ozone chemistry | carbon and oxygen cycles | heat and water budgets | aerosols | water vapor | clouds | ocean circulation | orbital variations | volcanism | plate tectonics | solar system | solar variability | climate model | energy balance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.740 Paleoceanography (MIT)

Description

This class examines tools, data, and ideas related to past climate changes as seen in marine, ice core, and continental records. The most recent climate changes (mainly the past 500,000 years, ranging up to about 2 million years ago) will be emphasized. Quantitative tools for the examination of paleoceanographic data will be introduced (statistics, factor analysis, time series analysis, simple climatology).Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files found on this course site. Free Microsoft® Excel viewer software can also be used to view the .xls files.

Subjects

history of the earth-surface environment | deep-sea sediments | ice cores | corals | Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | seawater composition | atmospheric chemistry | climate | ocean temperature | circulation | chemistry | glacial/interglacial cycles | orbital forcing | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | 5. Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes | Micropaleontological | isotopic | geochemical | and mineralogical changes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.335 Experimental Atmospheric Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the atmospheric chemistry involved in climate change, air pollution and biogeochemical cycles using a combination of hands-on laboratory, field studies, and simple computer models. Lectures will be accompanied by field trips to collect air samples for the analysis of gases, aerosols and clouds by the students.

Subjects

atmospheric chemistry | climate change | air pollution | urban environment | biogeochemical cycles | gases | aerosols | precipitation | photochemistry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.002J Making Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course aims to get students thinking about politics and policy as a part of their everyday life. We treat politics as a struggle among competing advocates trying to persuade others to see the world as they do, working within a context that is structured primarily by institutions and cultural ideas. We’ll begin by developing a policymaking framework, understanding ideology, and taking a whirlwind tour of the American political system. Then, we’ll examine six policy issues in depth: health care, gun control, the federal budget, immigration reform, same-sex marriage, and energy and climate change.

Subjects

public policy | politics | policy | advocate | institutions | government | ideology | health care | gun control | federal budget | immigration | same-sex marriage | energy | climate change | reform | capitalism | freedom | agendas | congress | interest groups | public opinion | obamacare | ACA | recession | deficit | debt | fiscal cliff | sequester | executive action | social policy | amendment | federalism | judicial review | renewable energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Urban Climate Adaptation (MIT)

Description

"Designing a dream city is easy. Rebuilding a living one takes imagination."    -Jane JacobsThis course examines the challenges that cities will face and strategies they can use to prepare for the impacts of climate change. Particular attention will be paid to the presence of global disparities, the needs of vulnerable populations and resource constrained locales, and the ways in which local government and community-based activities can achieve equitable levels of climate-readiness. 

Subjects

climate change | urban | urban vulnerability | adaptation | climate | urban planning | environment | resiliency | city | community

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.S196 Global Freshwater Crisis (MIT)

Description

For the first time in history, the global demand for freshwater is overtaking its supply in many parts of the world. The U.N. predicts that by 2025, more than half of the countries in the world will be experiencing water stress or outright shortages. Lack of water can cause disease, food shortages, starvation, migrations, political conflict, and even lead to war. Models of cooperation, both historic and contemporary, show the way forward. The first half of the course details the multiple facets of the water crisis. Topics include water systems, water transfers, dams, pollution, climate change, scarcity, water conflict/cooperation, food security, and agriculture. The second half of the course describes innovative solutions: Adaptive technologies and adaptation through policy, planning, mana

Subjects

Freshwater | water shortage | water systems | water transfers | dams | pollution | climate change | scarcity | water conflict/cooperation | food security | agriculture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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