Searching for conceive : 68 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3

The analyst: or, a discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician. Wherein it is examined whether the object, ... and inferences of the modern analysis are more distinctly conceived, or more evidently deduced, than religious mysteries ... By the author of The minute philosopher. The analyst: or, a discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician. Wherein it is examined whether the object, ... and inferences of the modern analysis are more distinctly conceived, or more evidently deduced, than religious mysteries ... By the author of The minute philosopher.

Description

ebook version of The analyst: or, a discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician. Wherein it is examined whether the object, ... and inferences of the modern analysis are more distinctly conceived, or more evidently deduced, than religious mysteries ... By the author of The minute philosopher. ebook version of The analyst: or, a discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician. Wherein it is examined whether the object, ... and inferences of the modern analysis are more distinctly conceived, or more evidently deduced, than religious mysteries ... By the author of The minute philosopher.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.ota.ox.ac.uk/catalogue/epubfeed.rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.000 How and Why Machines Work (MIT) 2.000 How and Why Machines Work (MIT)

Description

Subject studies how and why machines work, how they are conceived, how they are developed (drawn), and how they are utilized. Students learn from the hands-on experiences of taking things apart mentally and physically, drawing (sketching, 3D CAD) what they envision and observe, taking occasional field trips, and completing an individual term project (concept, creation, and presentation). Emphasis on understanding the physics and history of machines. Subject studies how and why machines work, how they are conceived, how they are developed (drawn), and how they are utilized. Students learn from the hands-on experiences of taking things apart mentally and physically, drawing (sketching, 3D CAD) what they envision and observe, taking occasional field trips, and completing an individual term project (concept, creation, and presentation). Emphasis on understanding the physics and history of machines.

Subjects

machines | machines | conceived | conceived | developed | developed | drawn | drawn | hands-on experience | hands-on experience | sketching | sketching | field trips | field trips | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210 | History | History | theory | theory | Twentieth century | Twentieth century | social | social | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | primary sources | primary sources | narrative | narrative | methodology | methodology | social processes | social processes | ordinary people | ordinary people | collective mentalities | collective mentalities | structure | structure | material life | material life | obscure | obscure | oppressed | oppressed | poor | poor | Annales school | Annales school | conceptualization | conceptualization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | history | theory | theory | method | method | contemporary | contemporary | twentieth century | twentieth century | social history | social history | economics | economics | primary source | primary source | narrative | narrative | analysis | analysis | cultural history | cultural history | 20th century | 20th century | Annales school | Annales school | agrarian history | agrarian history | class | class | race | race | gender | gender | historical categories | historical categories | historical demography | historical demography | new economic history | new economic history | military history | military history | environmental history | environmental history | film | film | Europe | Europe | America | America | Asia | Asia | primary sources | primary sources | 21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT) 15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing. Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing.

Subjects

Management | Management | product development | product development | research | industrial | research | industrial | marketing | marketing | commercial products | commercial products | design-for-manufacturing | design-for-manufacturing | concept design | concept design | product architecture | product architecture | concept generation | concept generation | product planning | product planning | 15.783 | 15.783 | 2.739 | 2.739 | ESD.32 | ESD.32

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.195 Special Problems in Architectural Design (MIT) 4.195 Special Problems in Architectural Design (MIT)

Description

This class focuses on representation tools used by architects during the design process and attempts to discuss the relationship they develop with the object of design. Representation plays a key role in architectural design, not only as a medium of conveying and narrating a determined meaning or a preconceived idea, but also as a code of creating new meaning, while the medium seeks to establish a relationship with itself. In this sense, mediums of representation, as external parameters to the design process, are not neutral tools of translating an idea into its concrete form. They are neither authentic means of creativity, nor vapid carriers of an idea. Therefore, an important aspect in issues of meaning is how the architect manipulates the play of translating a concept to its concrete ve This class focuses on representation tools used by architects during the design process and attempts to discuss the relationship they develop with the object of design. Representation plays a key role in architectural design, not only as a medium of conveying and narrating a determined meaning or a preconceived idea, but also as a code of creating new meaning, while the medium seeks to establish a relationship with itself. In this sense, mediums of representation, as external parameters to the design process, are not neutral tools of translating an idea into its concrete form. They are neither authentic means of creativity, nor vapid carriers of an idea. Therefore, an important aspect in issues of meaning is how the architect manipulates the play of translating a concept to its concrete ve

Subjects

representation | representation | digital media | digital media | digital design | digital design | images | images | mapping | mapping | material studies | material studies | architecture | architecture | CAD | CAD | design | design | rendering | rendering | modeling | modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Numbers: Five Centuries of Digital Design (MIT) Numbers: Five Centuries of Digital Design (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to highlight some technical aspects of the classical tradition in architecture that have so far received only sporadic attention. It is well known that quantification has always been an essential component of classical design: proportional systems in particular have been keenly investigated. But the actual technical tools whereby quantitative precision was conceived, represented, transmitted, and implemented in pre-modern architecture remain mostly unexplored. By showing that a dialectical relationship between architectural theory and data-processing technologies was as crucial in the past as it is today, this course hopes to promote a more historically aware understanding of the current computer-induced transformations in architectural design. The aim of this course is to highlight some technical aspects of the classical tradition in architecture that have so far received only sporadic attention. It is well known that quantification has always been an essential component of classical design: proportional systems in particular have been keenly investigated. But the actual technical tools whereby quantitative precision was conceived, represented, transmitted, and implemented in pre-modern architecture remain mostly unexplored. By showing that a dialectical relationship between architectural theory and data-processing technologies was as crucial in the past as it is today, this course hopes to promote a more historically aware understanding of the current computer-induced transformations in architectural design.

Subjects

drawing | drawing | design | design | computation | computation | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | Alberti | Alberti | Serlio | Serlio | Brunelleschi | Brunelleschi | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | art | art | architecture | architecture | numeric control | numeric control | construction | construction | historical design | historical design | digital design | digital design | Gehry | Gehry | automation | automation | numeracy | numeracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching,

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO | structural testing | structural testing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. The books we read have all made significant contributions to their respective sub-fields and have been selected to give as wide a coverage in both field and methodology as possible in one semester's worth of reading. We examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. The books we read have all made significant contributions to their respective sub-fields and have been selected to give as wide a coverage in both field and methodology as possible in one semester's worth of reading. We examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

History | History | Historical | Historical | Methods | Methods | Sources | Sources | Narrative | Narrative | Analytic | Analytic | writing methods | writing methods | historians | historians | annales | annales | gender | gender | middle ages | middle ages | fantasy | fantasy | environment | environment | demography | demography | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT) 7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT)

Description

Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuses on developing the participants' ability to uncover and confront student misconceptions and to foster student understanding and retention of key concepts. Participants read primary literature on science education, uncover basic concepts often overlooked when teaching biology, and lead a small week Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuses on developing the participants' ability to uncover and confront student misconceptions and to foster student understanding and retention of key concepts. Participants read primary literature on science education, uncover basic concepts often overlooked when teaching biology, and lead a small week

Subjects

teaching | teaching | learning | learning | concept-centered | concept-centered | education | education | science education | science education | biology | biology | student learning | student learning | misconceptions | misconceptions | studies | studies | biology teaching | biology teaching | teaching environment | teaching environment | pre-conceived notions | pre-conceived notions | learning environment | learning environment | classroom | classroom | cooperative learning | cooperative learning | group learning | group learning | assessment | assessment | multiple intelligences | multiple intelligences

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT) 7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT)

Description

Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuses on developing the participants' ability to uncover and confront student misconceptions and to foster student understanding and retention of key concepts. Participants read primary literature on science education, uncover basic concepts often overlooked when teaching biology, and lead a small week Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuses on developing the participants' ability to uncover and confront student misconceptions and to foster student understanding and retention of key concepts. Participants read primary literature on science education, uncover basic concepts often overlooked when teaching biology, and lead a small week

Subjects

teaching | teaching | learning | learning | concept-centered | concept-centered | education | education | science education | science education | biology | biology | student learning | student learning | misconceptions | misconceptions | studies | studies | biology teaching | biology teaching | teaching environment | teaching environment | pre-conceived notions | pre-conceived notions | learning environment | learning environment | classroom | classroom | cooperative learning | cooperative learning | group learning | group learning | assessment | assessment | multiple intelligences | multiple intelligences

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-7.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.492-1 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Process Control by Design (MIT) 10.492-1 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Process Control by Design (MIT)

Description

In the ICE-Topics courses, various chemical engineering problems are presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasis is on the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies.The broad context for this ICE-Topics module is the commonsense notion that, when designing something, one should plan for the off-normal conditions that may occur. A continuous process is conceived and designed as a steady-state operation. However, the process must start up, shut down, and operate in the event of disturbances, and so the time-varying b In the ICE-Topics courses, various chemical engineering problems are presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasis is on the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies.The broad context for this ICE-Topics module is the commonsense notion that, when designing something, one should plan for the off-normal conditions that may occur. A continuous process is conceived and designed as a steady-state operation. However, the process must start up, shut down, and operate in the event of disturbances, and so the time-varying b

Subjects

process control | process control | heat exchanger network | heat exchanger network | design | design | shower process | shower process | continuous chemical processes | continuous chemical processes | dynamic simulation | dynamic simulation | implementation | implementation | controllers | controllers | feedback structure | feedback structure | material model | material model | energy balance model | energy balance model | linearizing equations | linearizing equations | Relative Gain Array | Relative Gain Array | Disturbance Cost | Disturbance Cost | proportional control algorithm | proportional control algorithm | steady-state model | steady-state model | numerical linearization | numerical linearization | matrix operations | matrix operations | variable pairing | variable pairing | process simulators | process simulators | design process | design process | offset phenomenon | offset phenomenon | RGA | RGA | DC | DC | heat recovery scheme | heat recovery scheme

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-10.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT) 15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing. Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing.

Subjects

product design | product design | product development | product development | prototyping | prototyping | machining | machining | fabrication | fabrication | design | design | CAD/CAM | CAD/CAM | marketing | marketing | product placement | product placement | innovation | innovation | marketplace analysis | marketplace analysis | industrial design | industrial design | modern design | modern design | design tools | design tools | 15.783 | 15.783 | 2.739 | 2.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.974 Leadership Lab (MIT) 15.974 Leadership Lab (MIT)

Description

This five-day interactive and experiential workshop focuses on how leaders lead innovations that both promote social responsibility and produce business success. The workshop is organized around three main parts: observation, sense-making, and creating. During the observation phase, students spend a full day inside the Boston office of the design company IDEO and visit some of the most interesting proven innovators in corporate social responsibility such as Ben & Jerry’s, KLD, MBDC, Plug Power (fuel cell technology), PwC, Schlumberger, or core team members of the UN Global Compact. After returning from their company visits, students describe to one another what they saw and learned. In the final part of the Lab, students conceive and implement innovation projects that serve This five-day interactive and experiential workshop focuses on how leaders lead innovations that both promote social responsibility and produce business success. The workshop is organized around three main parts: observation, sense-making, and creating. During the observation phase, students spend a full day inside the Boston office of the design company IDEO and visit some of the most interesting proven innovators in corporate social responsibility such as Ben & Jerry’s, KLD, MBDC, Plug Power (fuel cell technology), PwC, Schlumberger, or core team members of the UN Global Compact. After returning from their company visits, students describe to one another what they saw and learned. In the final part of the Lab, students conceive and implement innovation projects that serve

Subjects

leadership | leadership | ethics | ethics | corporate | corporate | responsibility | responsibility | social innovation | social innovation | organizational change | organizational change | business | business | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | collaboration | collaboration | corporate responsibility | corporate responsibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj

Subjects

space systems engineering | space systems engineering | CDIO | CDIO | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | trajectory analysis | trajectory analysis | entry dynamics | entry dynamics | propulsion | propulsion | power | power | structural design | structural design | avionics | avionics | thermal control | thermal control | environmental control | environmental control | human factors | human factors | support systems | support systems | weight estimates | weight estimates | cost estimates | cost estimates | student projects | student projects | integrated vehicle design | integrated vehicle design | team communication | team communication | electromagnetic formation flight | electromagnetic formation flight | satellites | satellites | TARR preparation | TARR preparation | subsystem design | subsystem design | subsystem prototyping | subsystem prototyping | trade analysis and requirements review | trade analysis and requirements review

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT) 21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state. This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | political | political | violence | violence | human rights | human rights | freedom | freedom | peace | peace | justice | justice | citizens | citizens | state | state | historical debates | historical debates | cultural | cultural | natural | natural | western European | western European | moral values | moral values | differences | differences | culture | culture | religion | religion | gender | gender | relationships | relationships | individuals | individuals | collective groups | collective groups | ethnography | ethnography | case studies | case studies | conflict | conflict | globe | globe | war crimes tribunals | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | truth commissions | individual | individual | collective | collective | traumas | traumas | rule of law | rule of law | representative governance | representative governance | 21A.225 | 21A.225 | SP.621 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.449 End of Nature (MIT) 21L.449 End of Nature (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about nature and the natural environment of mankind. The term nature in this context has to do with the varying ways in which the physical world has been conceived as the habitation of mankind, a source of imperatives for the collective organization and conduct of human life. In this sense, nature is less the object of complex scientific investigation than the object of individual experience and direct observation. Using the term "nature" in this sense, we can say that modern reference to "the environment" owes much to three ideas about the relation of mankind to nature. In the first of these, which harks back to ancient medical t This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about nature and the natural environment of mankind. The term nature in this context has to do with the varying ways in which the physical world has been conceived as the habitation of mankind, a source of imperatives for the collective organization and conduct of human life. In this sense, nature is less the object of complex scientific investigation than the object of individual experience and direct observation. Using the term "nature" in this sense, we can say that modern reference to "the environment" owes much to three ideas about the relation of mankind to nature. In the first of these, which harks back to ancient medical t

Subjects

literature | literature | philosophy | philosophy | religion | religion | western | western | politics | politics | nature | nature | history | history | ethics | ethics | industrial culture | industrial culture | aristotle | aristotle | defoe | defoe | hume | hume | rousseau | rousseau | wordsworth | wordsworth | thoreau | thoreau | darwon | darwon | wells | wells | faulkner | faulkner | early modern | early modern | contemporary | contemporary | darwin | darwin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Art and war Art and war

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module will focus on the treatment of war or the representation of war in art broadly conceived: war stories, war photography, war paintings, war films, war music, even war architecture - war memorials and war museums. It will seek to ask in what ways such works contribute to our understanding of war, and by extension our understanding of international relations. How effective are they? Can works of the imagination - works of art - reach parts that other works cannot reach? How? What strategies do they employ? Do they have to be explicit? Do they have to be easy to read (or watch or listen to)? In what ways are we affected by them? What difference can they make? Module This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module will focus on the treatment of war or the representation of war in art broadly conceived: war stories, war photography, war paintings, war films, war music, even war architecture - war memorials and war museums. It will seek to ask in what ways such works contribute to our understanding of war, and by extension our understanding of international relations. How effective are they? Can works of the imagination - works of art - reach parts that other works cannot reach? How? What strategies do they employ? Do they have to be explicit? Do they have to be easy to read (or watch or listen to)? In what ways are we affected by them? What difference can they make? Module

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Module Code: M14060 | Module Code: M14060 | Module Code: M14061 | Module Code: M14061 | representation of war in art | representation of war in art | war stories | war stories | war photography | war photography | war museums | war museums | understanding of war | understanding of war | war architecture | war architecture

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ESD.051J Engineering Innovation and Design (MIT) ESD.051J Engineering Innovation and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV selected lectures. Learn to produce great designs, be a more effective engineer, and communicate with high emotional and intellectual impact. This project based course gives students the ability to understand, contextualize, and analyze engineering designs and systems. By learning and applying design thinking, students will more effectively solve problems in any domain. Lectures focus on teaching a tested, iterative design process as well as techniques to sharpen creative analysis. Guest lectures from all disciplines illustrate different approaches to design thinking. This course develops students' skills to conceive, organize, lead, implement, and evaluate successful projects in any engineering discipline. Additionally, students Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV selected lectures. Learn to produce great designs, be a more effective engineer, and communicate with high emotional and intellectual impact. This project based course gives students the ability to understand, contextualize, and analyze engineering designs and systems. By learning and applying design thinking, students will more effectively solve problems in any domain. Lectures focus on teaching a tested, iterative design process as well as techniques to sharpen creative analysis. Guest lectures from all disciplines illustrate different approaches to design thinking. This course develops students' skills to conceive, organize, lead, implement, and evaluate successful projects in any engineering discipline. Additionally, students

Subjects

ESD.051 | ESD.051 | 6.902 | 6.902 | design thinking | design thinking | technology innovation | technology innovation | product design | product design | engineering design | engineering design | industrial design | industrial design | design process | design process | creative analysis | creative analysis | design project implementation | design project implementation | usability | usability | user experience | user experience

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata