Searching for elector : 95 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4

17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT) 17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT)

Description

This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature. This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature.

Subjects

election | election | barack obama | barack obama | mitt romney | mitt romney | hillary clinton | hillary clinton | political geography | political geography | realignment | realignment | political parties | political parties | democrat | democrat | republican | republican | incumbency advantage | incumbency advantage | electoral college | electoral college | partisan | partisan | demographics | demographics | campaigns | campaigns | constituencies | constituencies | voters | voters | voting | voting | gridlock | gridlock | campaign finance reform | campaign finance reform | lobbying | lobbying | campaign spending | campaign spending | citizens united | citizens united | referendums | referendums | turnout | turnout | representation | representation | governance | governance | government | government | inequality | inequality | gerrymandering | gerrymandering | redistricting | redistricting | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | political economy | rational choice | rational choice | legislature | legislature | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | court | court | and elections | and elections | electoral competition | electoral competition | comparative | comparative | international | international | public goods | public goods | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | multiparty competition | electoral system | electoral system | voter | voter | agency models | agency models | models of political parties | models of political parties | point-valued solution | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | minorities | minorities | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | government stability | government stability | informational theory | informational theory | distributive theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | representative democracy | direct democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

t vote this time”: How to improve electoral surveys t vote this time”: How to improve electoral surveys

Description

How can we improve the quality of post-election survey data on electoral turnout? That is the core question of our recent paper. We present a novel way to question citizens about their voting behaviour that increases the truthfulness of responses. Our research finds that the inclusion of “face-saving” response items can drastically improve the accuracy of reported turnout. Usually, the turnout reported in post-election surveys is much higher than in reality, and this is partly due to actual abstainers pretending that they have voted. Why do they lie? In many countries, voting is a social norm widely shared by the ... How can we improve the quality of post-election survey data on electoral turnout? That is the core question of our recent paper. We present a novel way to question citizens about their voting behaviour that increases the truthfulness of responses. Our research finds that the inclusion of “face-saving” response items can drastically improve the accuracy of reported turnout. Usually, the turnout reported in post-election surveys is much higher than in reality, and this is partly due to actual abstainers pretending that they have voted. Why do they lie? In many countries, voting is a social norm widely shared by the ...

Subjects

Advances in Political Science Methods | Advances in Political Science Methods | Elections | Elections | surveys | surveys | turnout | turnout

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Russians will be voting on Sunday. Here’s what you need to know Russians will be voting on Sunday. Here’s what you need to know

Description

Russian voters will elect 450 deputies to Russia’s State Duma on Sunday, in the seventh election for the lower chamber of Russia’s bicameral Federal Assembly since the legislature’s founding in 1993. Large-scale protests followed the last federal parliamentary elections on Dec. 4, 2011, after widespread reports of electoral fraud and rigged elections. Within days, an estimated 50,000 protesters across from the Kremlin were chanting “Russia without Putin.” This year, 14 political parties are taking part in elections that were moved forward from December to September. Observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe will monitor the elections, which will return to a mixed electoral system last used in ... Russian voters will elect 450 deputies to Russia’s State Duma on Sunday, in the seventh election for the lower chamber of Russia’s bicameral Federal Assembly since the legislature’s founding in 1993. Large-scale protests followed the last federal parliamentary elections on Dec. 4, 2011, after widespread reports of electoral fraud and rigged elections. Within days, an estimated 50,000 protesters across from the Kremlin were chanting “Russia without Putin.” This year, 14 political parties are taking part in elections that were moved forward from December to September. Observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe will monitor the elections, which will return to a mixed electoral system last used in ...

Subjects

Duma | Duma | Elections | Elections | Putin | Putin | Russia | Russia

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

GB electoral geography changes

Description

Interactive flash object demonstrating changes in the electoral geography of parts of London between 1991 and 2001

Subjects

geography digital boundaries geographical information systems gis electoral local government england london | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Campaigns and Elections

Description

The course will focus on the history and evolution of elections and voting laws in the United States, as well as what compels individuals to run for office and how campaigns are structured. Also, the course will teach the student the role that political parties, interest groups, voters, and the media play in elections. Lastly, the student will take a closer look at electoral outcomes and the impact that elections have on public policy after votes are counted, as well as what types of proposals could be implemented to improve the U.S. electoral system. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (POLSC333)

Subjects

political science | politics | government | campaigns | elections | voting | political parties | voters | strategy | voter | media | electoral reform | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.263 U.S. National Elections (MIT)

Description

This course provides a selective overview of electoral politics in the United States, with an emphasis on presidential and congressional elections. It examines the macro-level determinants of electoral outcomes as well as the political behavior of individual Americans. Each week covers a different topic, with readings designed to highlight controversies or debates in the political science literature.

Subjects

election | barack obama | mitt romney | hillary clinton | political geography | realignment | political parties | democrat | republican | incumbency advantage | electoral college | partisan | demographics | campaigns | constituencies | voters | voting | gridlock | campaign finance reform | lobbying | campaign spending | citizens united | referendums | turnout | representation | governance | government | inequality | gerrymandering | redistricting | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Georgian Britain - the electoral system

Description

A podcast lecture summary on Georgian Britain: the electoral system

Subjects

License

Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

Site sourced from

http://humbox.ac.uk/cgi/oai2?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

British Parliament: Electoral Politics in the Age of Reform

Description

A podcast lecture on British parliamentary and electoral politics, 1688-1832: electoral politics in the age of reform

Subjects

License

Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

Site sourced from

http://humbox.ac.uk/cgi/oai2?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT) 17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies (MIT)

Description

This graduate class is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. It also serves as preparation for the IPE portion of the International Relations general exam. An important goal of the course is to use economic theories to identify the welfare effects, distributional consequences, and security implication of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas, and power politics interact to share policy outcomes. This graduate class is designed as a Ph.D.-level overview of international political economy (IPE), with an emphasis on the advanced industrial countries. It also serves as preparation for the IPE portion of the International Relations general exam. An important goal of the course is to use economic theories to identify the welfare effects, distributional consequences, and security implication of foreign economic policy decisions, and to use the tools of political science to analyze how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas, and power politics interact to share policy outcomes.

Subjects

International Trade | International Trade | Industries | Industries | International Monetary | International Monetary | International Financial Relations | International Financial Relations | International Political Economy and Security | International Political Economy and Security | Voters | Voters | Cleavages | Cleavages | institutions | institutions | structure | structure | Exchange Rate Regimes | Exchange Rate Regimes | Currency Crises | Currency Crises | International Capital Mobility | International Capital Mobility | Domestic Policymaking | Domestic Policymaking | Capital Account Openness | Capital Account Openness | Foreign Direct Investment | Foreign Direct Investment | Conflict | Conflict | Economic Interdependence | Economic Interdependence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT) 17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine

Subjects

game theory | game theory | game theoretic concepts | game theoretic concepts | games of complete information | games of complete information | games of incomplete information | games of incomplete information | political phenomena | political phenomena | legislative rules | legislative rules | nuclear deterrence | nuclear deterrence | electoral competition | electoral competition | imperfect markets | imperfect markets | probability | probability | calculus | calculus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Using the Census to Investigate Voting Behaviour in Britain

Description

This unit aims to: * provide an appreciation of the opportunities and drawbacks associated with the ecological analysis of voting behaviour in Britain. * develop powers of critical and analytical thinking and logical argument about contemporary issues and controversies surrounding turnout and electoral engagement. On completing this resource you will have an understanding of: * the gap between electors and elected. * the class, sex, age, ethnicity and educational profiles of the elected representatives in Britain. * Whether there is a need for the parliamentary and candidate elite to more closely reflect society. * Who is represented? * Social capital, participation and turnout. * Marginality and ideological proximity. * Turnout in general elections and elections for the European Parliamen

Subjects

census | voting | voting behaviour | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.267 Democracy in America (MIT) 17.267 Democracy in America (MIT)

Description

This course examines the functioning of democracy in the U.S. beginning with the theoretical foundations of democratic representation. It explores how the views of the public influence policy making. It also examines factors, such as malapportionment, that lead to non-majoritarian outcomes. Evidence on how well policy outcomes reflect public opinion is reviewed, and whether certain groups are over or under-represented in the policy process. Also discussed are reforms that might make our democracy more responsive to the American public. This course examines the functioning of democracy in the U.S. beginning with the theoretical foundations of democratic representation. It explores how the views of the public influence policy making. It also examines factors, such as malapportionment, that lead to non-majoritarian outcomes. Evidence on how well policy outcomes reflect public opinion is reviewed, and whether certain groups are over or under-represented in the policy process. Also discussed are reforms that might make our democracy more responsive to the American public.

Subjects

democratic representation | democratic representation | public opinion | public opinion | malapportionment | malapportionment | institutional reform | institutional reform | non-majoritarian policy | non-majoritarian policy | meidan voter | meidan voter | electoral accountability | electoral accountability | primary constituencies | primary constituencies | elites | elites | voter turnout | voter turnout | interest groups | interest groups | incumbency bias | incumbency bias | one-person | one-vote | one-person | one-vote | term limits | term limits | udges | udges | redistricting | redistricting | campaign finance | campaign finance | convenience voting | convenience voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Image from ?[A Topographical Dictionary of Wales ? with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, etc.]?, 002157705

Description

Image from ?[A Topographical Dictionary of Wales ? with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, etc.]?, 002157705 Author: LEWIS, Samuel Topographer, the Elder Volume: 01 Page: 416 Year: 1843 Place: London Publisher: View all the images from this book Following the link above will take you to the British Library?s integrated catalogue. You will be able to download a PDF of the book this image is taken from, as well as view the pages up close with the ?itemViewer?. Click on the 'related items? to search for the electronic version of this work. Open the page in the British Library?s itemViewer (page: 000416) Download the PDF for this book

Subjects

bldigital | bl_labs | britishlibrary | 1843 | similar_to_90552702057_place_of_publishing | new_train_of_thought

License

http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

Site sourced from

http://mechanicalcurator.tumblr.com/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Image from ?[A Topographical Dictionary of Wales ? with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, etc.]?, 002157705

Description

Image from ?[A Topographical Dictionary of Wales ? with an appendix, describing the electoral boundaries of the several boroughs, etc.]?, 002157705 Author: LEWIS, Samuel Topographer, the Elder Volume: 01 Page: 416 Year: 1843 Place: London Publisher: View all the images from this book Following the link above will take you to the British Library?s integrated catalogue. You will be able to download a PDF of the book this image is taken from, as well as view the pages up close with the ?itemViewer?. Click on the 'related items? to search for the electronic version of this work. Open the page in the British Library?s itemViewer (page: 000416) Download the PDF for this book

Subjects

bldigital | bl_labs | britishlibrary | 1843 | similar_to_93197334767_place_of_publishing | similar_to_93197334767_slantyness | similar_to_93197334767_bubblyness_avesize

License

http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

Site sourced from

http://mechanicalcurator.tumblr.com/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.506 The Business of Politics: A View of Latin America (MIT) 21A.506 The Business of Politics: A View of Latin America (MIT)

Description

This class looks at the birth and international expansion of an American industry of political marketing, with a special emphasis on Latin America. We will focus our attention on the cultural processes, sociopolitical contexts and moral utopias that shape the practice of political marketing in the U.S. and in different Latin American countries. By looking at the debates and expert practices at the core of the business of politics, we will explore how the "universal" concept of democracy is interpreted and reworked as it travels through space and time. Specifically, we will study how different groups experimenting with political marketing in different cultural contexts understand the role of citizens in a democracy. This class looks at the birth and international expansion of an American industry of political marketing, with a special emphasis on Latin America. We will focus our attention on the cultural processes, sociopolitical contexts and moral utopias that shape the practice of political marketing in the U.S. and in different Latin American countries. By looking at the debates and expert practices at the core of the business of politics, we will explore how the "universal" concept of democracy is interpreted and reworked as it travels through space and time. Specifically, we will study how different groups experimenting with political marketing in different cultural contexts understand the role of citizens in a democracy.

Subjects

business | business | politics | politics | Latin America | Latin America | marketing | marketing | democracy | democracy | elections | elections | political consulting | political consulting | political campaign | political campaign | party system | party system | electoral legislation | electoral legislation | media platform | media platform | strategy | strategy | public relations | public relations | market research | market research | floating signifiers | floating signifiers | neopopulism | neopopulism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

It is the perception of immigration levels, rather than actual change in local areas, that explains the UKIP vote

Description

Is there evidence that UKIP support is channelled by local concerns about the influx of immigrants? In fact, the UKIP vote is not actually driven by experience of change in local areas. Instead, the UKIP vote is correlated with the perception of levels of immigration. The renewed interested in the connection between immigration and electoral politics can be traced to the spectacular rise of UKIP. Even though the party secured just one seat in 2015 general election, its anti-immigration rhetoric resonated strongly among certain sections of Britain’s electorate – UKIP polled 13 per cent of the vote and came second in 120 out of 624 contested seats. Although the party originallyfocused around Conservative euroscepticism rather than immigration, relative to supporters of other parties UKIP

Subjects

British Politics | Decision 2015 | Democracy and Elections | Political Science

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Franchise Reform and changing constituencies

Description

The Franchise is the right to vote in public elections. Over the last two hundred years there have been large changes in who was allowed to vote, and in the areas (parliamentary constituencies) in which voting took place. This tutorial covers changing voting rules and changing electoral geography from the First Reform Act of 1832 to the present - the development of Britain's democratric processes from the domain of the privileged few, to a system all adults have the right to participate in.

Subjects

franchise | election | history | constituency | reform | vote | voting | electoral | democracy | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Congressional Politics

Description

In this course, the student will learn about the complexities of the legislative branch by examining the U.S. Congress in the American political system. This course will focus first on the history of Congress and the tension between Congress’ competing representation and lawmaking functions by examining the structure of Congress, its original purpose, and the factors that influence how members of Congress act. The course will then take a careful look at the internal politics and law-making processes of Congress by learning the external competing interests that shape legislative outcomes and why Congressional rules are designed as they are. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Political Science 331)

Subjects

political science | politics | government | congress | law | american politics | legislation | legislative branch | policy-making | federalism | media | electoral | electoral reform | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Damaged trust and a changing electorate?: Migration as a contemporary political issue in the UK

Description

Scott Blinder, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, gives a talk for the Immigration and democracy in the UK COMPAS Seminar Series. This talk reviews a wide variety of research findings on how migration functions as a political issue in today?s Britain, and how migration and migrants affect British political systems and outcomes. In the electoral context, I review evidence on how migration affected the 2010 election and how it is likely to affect the 2015 vote ? both through impact on majority-group voters and on the increasing population of migrants and ethnic minorities who vote as well. Beyond this, I examine evidence on how migration has changed British politics, through shifts in the party system and erosion of trust in the political system itself. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

migration | immigration | politics | society | migration | immigration | politics | society | 2015-04-30

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129204/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe The externalities of inequality: fear of crime and preferences for redistribution in Western Europe

Description

Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal Many politicians would agree that an individual’s relative income (i.e., whether she is rich or poor) affects her political behavior. Income differentials and the increase in inequality experienced in the recent past have become an important part of electoral politics in most industrialized democracies. If income matters to individual political behavior, it seems reasonable to assume that it does so through its influence on individual preferences for redistribution. The relationship between income inequality and redistribution preferences, however, is a hotly contested topic in the comparative political economy literature (and also in other fields like economics, as attested by the reactions to Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century). The post The externalities of inequal

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | European Politics and Society | European Politics and Society | The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | inequality | inequality | Redistribution | Redistribution

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Book Review: ‘Patronage as Politics in South Asia’ by Anastasia Piliavsky (ed.) Book Review: ‘Patronage as Politics in South Asia’ by Anastasia Piliavsky (ed.)

Description

In March, Uday Chandra of the Max Planck Institute reviewed ‘Patronage in Politics in South Asia’ for our Migration and Citizenship. In this post, I want to respond with my own analysis of the book’s arguments. It is true, as Anastasia Piliavsky points out in her superb introduction, that patronage has long been treated as a distasteful element of developing societies. Personalised exchange between social unequals has been viewed as either a perversion of liberalism’s central tenets of equality and freedom of choice or as a screen concealing exploitation. Quid pro quo electoral exchanges, in which votes are bartered for particular services rendered, are considered ‘bad’ democratic practice. And of course, the use of public power for private gain is unequivocally condemned as co In March, Uday Chandra of the Max Planck Institute reviewed ‘Patronage in Politics in South Asia’ for our Migration and Citizenship. In this post, I want to respond with my own analysis of the book’s arguments. It is true, as Anastasia Piliavsky points out in her superb introduction, that patronage has long been treated as a distasteful element of developing societies. Personalised exchange between social unequals has been viewed as either a perversion of liberalism’s central tenets of equality and freedom of choice or as a screen concealing exploitation. Quid pro quo electoral exchanges, in which votes are bartered for particular services rendered, are considered ‘bad’ democratic practice. And of course, the use of public power for private gain is unequivocally condemned as co

Subjects

Books | Books | Sociology of Citizenship | Sociology of Citizenship

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata