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14.386 New Econometric Methods (MIT) 14.386 New Econometric Methods (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on recent developments in econometrics, especially structural estimation. The topics include nonseparable models, models of imperfect competition, auction models, duration models, and nonlinear panel data. Results are illustrated with economic applications. This course focuses on recent developments in econometrics, especially structural estimation. The topics include nonseparable models, models of imperfect competition, auction models, duration models, and nonlinear panel data. Results are illustrated with economic applications.

Subjects

econometrics | econometrics | recent developments | recent developments | structural estimation | structural estimation | nonseparable models | nonseparable models | models of imperfect competition | models of imperfect competition | auction models | auction models | duration models | duration models | and nonlinear panel data | and nonlinear panel data | economic applications | economic applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.386 New Econometric Methods (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on recent developments in econometrics, especially structural estimation. The topics include nonseparable models, models of imperfect competition, auction models, duration models, and nonlinear panel data. Results are illustrated with economic applications.

Subjects

econometrics | recent developments | structural estimation | nonseparable models | models of imperfect competition | auction models | duration models | and nonlinear panel data | economic applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | nternational trade | nternational trade | foreign investment | foreign investment | commercial policy | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | wage inequality | external scale economics | external scale economics | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | WTO | WTO | regionalism | regionalism | multilateralism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Intermediate Microeconomics

Description

This course is designed to extend the student’s knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Economics 201)

Subjects

microeconomics | trade | economics | externalities | producer | theory | investment | consumer | competition | auctions | costs | dynamics | equilibrium | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Intermediate Microeconomics

Description

This course is designed to extend the student’s knowledge of the basic microeconomic principles that will provide the foundation for their future work in economics and give them insight into how economic models can help us think about important real world phenomena. Topics include supply and demand interaction, utility maximization, profit maximization, elasticity, perfect competition, monopoly power, imperfect competition, and game theory. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Economics 201)

Subjects

microeconomics | trade | economics | externalities | producer | theory | investment | consumer | competition | auctions | costs | dynamics | equilibrium | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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International Trade

Description

Historically, international trade has played a critical role in enabling countries to grow, develop, and become economically powerful. Through international trade in goods and services, the economies of different countries are more closely linked to one another now than ever before. At the same time, the world economy is more turbulent now than it has been in decades. Keeping up with the shifting international environment has become a central concern in business strategy and national economic policy. This course uses the same fundamental methods of analysis deployed in other branches of economics, as the motives and behavior of individuals and firms remain the same whether they are in the context of international trade or domestic transactions. The student will learn, however, that in

Subjects

international trade | labor productivity | comparative advantage | income distribution | standard trade model | economies of scale | imperfect competition | international factor movements | national income accounting | international monetary system | optimum currency areas | global capital market | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | business choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | microeconomics | efficiency | supply | demand | consumer theory | producer theory | monopoly | imperfect competition | pricing | public goods | externalities | information uncertainty | group decision making | organizational architecture | international trade | equity | income distribution | economic rewards | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | nternational trade | foreign investment | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | external scale economics | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | innovation | technology transfer | product cycles | tariff retaliation | WTO | regionalism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | business choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | microeconomics | efficiency | supply | demand | consumer theory | producer theory | monopoly | imperfect competition | pricing | public goods | externalities | information uncertainty | group decision making | organizational architecture | international trade | equity | income distribution | economic rewards | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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