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Understanding international development Understanding international development

Description

This free course, Understanding international development, introduces and explores international development by considering the three themes referred to as PASH - Power and Agency, Scale and History, and programmes to promote livelihoods. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Understanding international development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Understanding international development, introduces and explores international development by considering the three themes referred to as PASH - Power and Agency, Scale and History, and programmes to promote livelihoods. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Understanding international development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Understanding international development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Understanding international development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

International Development | International Development | PASH | PASH | Agency | Agency | scales | scales | history | history | TD223_1 | TD223_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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11.005 Introduction to International Development (MIT) 11.005 Introduction to International Development (MIT)

Description

This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the "big questions" in our field. This course will unpack these questions by providing an overview of existing knowledge and best practices in the field. The goal of this class is to go beyond traditional dichotomies and narrow definitions of progress, well-being, and culture. Instead, we will invite students to develop a more nuanced understanding of international development by offering an innovative set of tools and content flexibility. This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the "big questions" in our field. This course will unpack these questions by providing an overview of existing knowledge and best practices in the field. The goal of this class is to go beyond traditional dichotomies and narrow definitions of progress, well-being, and culture. Instead, we will invite students to develop a more nuanced understanding of international development by offering an innovative set of tools and content flexibility.

Subjects

international development | international development | poverty | poverty | development | development | governments | governments | markets | markets | structure | structure | agency | agency | wellbeing | wellbeing | progress | progress | culture | culture | policy | policy | socioeconomic | socioeconomic | colonialism | colonialism | ethical development | ethical development | identities | identities | modernization | modernization | growth paradigms | growth paradigms | development agenda | development agenda | industrialization | industrialization | debt crisis | debt crisis | globalization | globalization | washington consensus | washington consensus | institutions | institutions | continuous development | continuous development | bretton woods system | bretton woods system | cooperation | cooperation | NGOs | NGOs | non-governmental organization | non-governmental organization | capitalism | capitalism | private sector | private sector | development theory | development theory | international aid architecture | international aid architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT) SP.722 D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu D-Lab: Development, Design and Dissemination is a design studio course in which students work on international development projects for underserved communities. The class is focused on a participatory, iterative prototyping design process, with particular attention on the constraints faced when designing for developing communities. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects in collaboration with community partners, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students will learn about their partner communities through the collaborative design process and be exposed to many hands-on fabrication and prototyping skills relevant to development at MIT and manufacturing in their partner community. The course will consist of hands-on labs, guest speakers, and a gu

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Lesotho | Lesotho | Nicaragua | Nicaragua | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | AIDS | AIDS | solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT) SP.721 D-Lab: Development, Dialogue and Delivery (MIT)

Description

D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country. D-Lab is a year-long series of courses and field trips. The fall class provides a basic background in international development and appropriate technology through guest speakers, case studies and hands-on exercises. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in an IAP field trip to Haiti, India, Brazil, Honduras, Zambia, Samoa, or Lesotho and continue their work in a spring term design class. As part of the fall class, students will partner with community organizations in these countries and develop plans for the IAP site visit. In addition, students will learn about the culture, language, economics, politics and history of their host country.

Subjects

development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | Haiti | Haiti | India | India | Brazil | Brazil | Honduras | Honduras | Zambia | Zambia | Samoa | Samoa | Lesotho | Lesotho | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | cooking | cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | poverty | poverty | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT) 11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa. This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa.

Subjects

property law | property law | law | law | property | property | land use | land use | property fairness | property fairness | competition | competition | public trust | public trust | trespass | trespass | fair use | fair use | easements | easements | nuisance laws | nuisance laws | zoning | zoning | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | slavery | slavery | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | takings | takings | licenses | licenses | servitudes | servitudes | contestation | contestation | covenants | covenants | common ownership | common ownership | housing | housing | apartheid | apartheid | restitution | restitution | eviction | eviction | displacement | displacement | international development | international development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.005 Introduction to International Development (MIT)

Description

This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the "big questions" in our field. This course will unpack these questions by providing an overview of existing knowledge and best practices in the field. The goal of this class is to go beyond traditional dichotomies and narrow definitions of progress, well-being, and culture. Instead, we will invite students to develop a more nuanced understanding of international development by offering an innovative set of tools and content flexibility.

Subjects

international development | poverty | development | governments | markets | structure | agency | wellbeing | progress | culture | policy | socioeconomic | colonialism | ethical development | identities | modernization | growth paradigms | development agenda | industrialization | debt crisis | globalization | washington consensus | institutions | continuous development | bretton woods system | cooperation | NGOs | non-governmental organization | capitalism | private sector | development theory | international aid architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introducing international development management

Description

If you wonder why, when so much development action is taking place, life seems to stay so bad for so many people and you want to be involved in managing development better, this free course, Introducing international development management, is for you. First published on Mon, 20 Feb 2017 as Introducing international development management. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2017

Subjects

Society | Politics & Law | TU870_1

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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HST.184 Health Information Systems to Improve Quality of Care in Resource-Poor Settings (MIT) HST.184 Health Information Systems to Improve Quality of Care in Resource-Poor Settings (MIT)

Description

This course is a collaborative offering of Sana, Partners in Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The goal of this course is the development of innovations in information systems for developing countries that will (1) translate into improvement in health outcomes, (2) strengthen the existing organizational infrastructure, and (3) create a collaborative ecosystem to maximize the value of these innovations. The course will be taught by guest speakers who are internationally recognized experts in the field and who, with their operational experiences, will outline the challenges they faced and detail how these were addressed. This course is a collaborative offering of Sana, Partners in Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). The goal of this course is the development of innovations in information systems for developing countries that will (1) translate into improvement in health outcomes, (2) strengthen the existing organizational infrastructure, and (3) create a collaborative ecosystem to maximize the value of these innovations. The course will be taught by guest speakers who are internationally recognized experts in the field and who, with their operational experiences, will outline the challenges they faced and detail how these were addressed.

Subjects

health informatics | health informatics | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | health care management | health care management | public health | public health | international development | international development | developing country | developing country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-Western countries. The issues covered by the course include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing and labor standards, post-conflict development and the role of aid in development.

Subjects

international development | international development | colonialism | colonialism | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | global | global | state | state | markets | markets | NGOs | NGOs | social movements | social movements | urban | urban | rural | rural | migration | migration | trade | trade | outsourcing | outsourcing | corruption | corruption | aid | aid | poverty | poverty | security | security | conflict | conflict | state intervention | state intervention | governance | governance | law | law | privatization | privatization | participatory planning | participatory planning | decentralization | decentralization | civil service | civil service | labor | labor | post-conflict | post-conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.479J Water and Sanitation Infrastructure in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.479J Water and Sanitation Infrastructure in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the principles of infrastructure planning in developing countries, with a focus on appropriate and sustainable technologies for water and sanitation. It also incorporates technical, socio-cultural, public health, and economic factors into the planning and design of water and sanitation systems. Upon completion, students will be able to plan simple, yet reliable, water supply and sanitation systems for developing countries that are compatible with local customs and available human and material resources. Graduate and upper division students from any department who are interested in international development at the grassroots level are encouraged to participate in this interdisciplinary subject. Acknowledgment This course was jointly developed by Earthea Nance and Sus This course deals with the principles of infrastructure planning in developing countries, with a focus on appropriate and sustainable technologies for water and sanitation. It also incorporates technical, socio-cultural, public health, and economic factors into the planning and design of water and sanitation systems. Upon completion, students will be able to plan simple, yet reliable, water supply and sanitation systems for developing countries that are compatible with local customs and available human and material resources. Graduate and upper division students from any department who are interested in international development at the grassroots level are encouraged to participate in this interdisciplinary subject. Acknowledgment This course was jointly developed by Earthea Nance and Sus

Subjects

chemical oceanography | chemical oceanography | biogeochemical cycling | biogeochemical cycling | water column processes | water column processes | ocean particles | ocean particles | seawater composition | seawater composition | ocean particle transport | ocean particle transport | carbon | carbon | oxygen | oxygen | nitrogen | nitrogen | phosphorus | phosphorus | sulfur | sulfur | carbon dioxide | carbon dioxide | sediment chemistry | sediment chemistry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.952 Gaoming Studio - China (MIT) 11.952 Gaoming Studio - China (MIT)

Description

The studio will focus on the district of Gaoming, located in the northwest of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) - the fastest growing and most productive region of China. The District has recently completed a planning effort in which several design institutes and a Hong Kong planning firm prepared ideas for a new central area near the river. The class will complement these efforts by focusing on planning and design options on the waterfront of the proposed new district and ways of integrating water/hydrological factors into all aspects and land uses of a modern city (residential, commercial, industrial) - including watershed and natural ecosystem protection, economic and recreational activities, transportation, and tourism. The studio will focus on the district of Gaoming, located in the northwest of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) - the fastest growing and most productive region of China. The District has recently completed a planning effort in which several design institutes and a Hong Kong planning firm prepared ideas for a new central area near the river. The class will complement these efforts by focusing on planning and design options on the waterfront of the proposed new district and ways of integrating water/hydrological factors into all aspects and land uses of a modern city (residential, commercial, industrial) - including watershed and natural ecosystem protection, economic and recreational activities, transportation, and tourism.

Subjects

watershed and natural ecosystem protection | watershed and natural ecosystem protection | economic development | economic development | recreation | recreation | transportation | transportation | tourism | tourism | urban design | urban design | Gaoming | China | Gaoming | China | hydrology | hydrology | ecology | ecology | cultural planning | cultural planning | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | international development | international development | regional planning | regional planning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.484 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.484 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of those projects. The course gives special consideration to cases in the developing world. Students will engage in a critical analysis of these tools and their role in the political economy of international development. The course will cover topics such as alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Introductory micro-economics is a pre-requisite for this course. This course covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of those projects. The course gives special consideration to cases in the developing world. Students will engage in a critical analysis of these tools and their role in the political economy of international development. The course will cover topics such as alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Introductory micro-economics is a pre-requisite for this course.

Subjects

project evaluation | project evaluation | politics | politics | project cycle | project cycle | development planning | development planning | financing | financing | investment | investment | cash flow | cash flow | discounting | discounting | alternative investment | alternative investment | forecasting | forecasting | inflation | inflation | risk management | risk management | risk analysis | risk analysis | markets | markets | market distortin | market distortin | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | taxation | taxation | monopoly | monopoly | social-distributive project appraisal | social-distributive project appraisal | institutions | institutions | rational analysis | rational analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations. This introductory course helps students learn to pose questions and analyze problems in the field of planning in developing countries. Not arguing for one "right" approach, the course draws on grounded empirical experiences - historical and recent - to help students navigate the way they approach their future work in developing-country governments, NGOs and international organizations.

Subjects

developing--country governments | developing--country governments | international | international | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | ecentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new--town development | new--town development | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low--cost housing | provision of low--cost housing | developing countries | developing countries | national planning | national planning | planners | planners | government institutions | government institutions | national government | national government | local government | local government | low-cost housing | low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | reform | reform | politics | politics | patronage | patronage | clientelism | clientelism | corruption | corruption | civil servants | civil servants | service-delivery organizations | service-delivery organizations | public vs. private | public vs. private

License

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21A.338J Gender, Power, and International Development (MIT) 21A.338J Gender, Power, and International Development (MIT)

Description

After decades of efforts to promote development, why is there so much poverty in the world? What are some of the root causes of inequality world-wide and why do poverty, economic transformations and development policies often have different consequences for women and men? This course explores these issues while also examining the history of development itself, its underlying assumptions, and its range of supporters and critics. It considers the various meanings given to development by women and men, primarily as residents of particular regions, but also as aid workers, policy makers and government officials. In considering how development projects and policies are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Melanesia, this course asks what are the After decades of efforts to promote development, why is there so much poverty in the world? What are some of the root causes of inequality world-wide and why do poverty, economic transformations and development policies often have different consequences for women and men? This course explores these issues while also examining the history of development itself, its underlying assumptions, and its range of supporters and critics. It considers the various meanings given to development by women and men, primarily as residents of particular regions, but also as aid workers, policy makers and government officials. In considering how development projects and policies are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Melanesia, this course asks what are the

Subjects

21A.338 | 21A.338 | WGS.457 | WGS.457 | anthropology | anthropology | gender | gender | power | power | international development | international development | inequlaity | inequlaity | poverty | poverty | economics | economics | political policy | political policy | women's studies | women's studies | government | government | africa | africa | latin america | latin america | asia | asia | melanesia | melanesia | social policy | social policy | urban | urban | rural | rural | SP.457J | SP.457J | WMN.457J | WMN.457J | SP.457 | SP.457 | WMN.457 | WMN.457

License

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MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT) MAS.965 NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users (MIT)

Description

Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to th

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | micro-finance | micro-finance | social entrepreneurship | social entrepreneurship | social venture | social venture | communications technology | communications technology | cell phone | cell phone | cellular technology | cellular technology | SMS | SMS | mobile phone | mobile phone | mobile technology | mobile technology | innovation | innovation | health care | health care | economic empowerment | economic empowerment | education | education | civic engagement | civic engagement | bottom of the pyramid | bottom of the pyramid | poverty | poverty | ICT | ICT | ICT4D | ICT4D | can you make a cellphone change the world? | can you make a cellphone change the world?

License

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SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT) SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa.

Subjects

Information | Information | information technology | information technology | communication | communication | communication technology | communication technology | innovation | innovation | Africa | Africa | international development | international development | international aid | international aid | policy | policy | ESG.SP259 | ESG.SP259

License

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21A.338J Gender, Power, and International Development (MIT) 21A.338J Gender, Power, and International Development (MIT)

Description

After decades of efforts to promote development, why is there so much poverty in the world? What are some of the root causes of inequality world-wide and why do poverty, economic transformations and development policies often have different consequences for women and men? This course explores these issues while also examining the history of development itself, its underlying assumptions, and its range of supporters and critics. It considers the various meanings given to development by women and men, primarily as residents of particular regions, but also as aid workers, policy makers and government officials. In considering how development projects and policies are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Melanesia, this course asks what are the After decades of efforts to promote development, why is there so much poverty in the world? What are some of the root causes of inequality world-wide and why do poverty, economic transformations and development policies often have different consequences for women and men? This course explores these issues while also examining the history of development itself, its underlying assumptions, and its range of supporters and critics. It considers the various meanings given to development by women and men, primarily as residents of particular regions, but also as aid workers, policy makers and government officials. In considering how development projects and policies are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Melanesia, this course asks what are the

Subjects

21A.338 | 21A.338 | WGS.457 | WGS.457 | anthropology | anthropology | gender | gender | power | power | international development | international development | inequlaity | inequlaity | poverty | poverty | economics | economics | political policy | political policy | women's studies | women's studies | government | government | africa | africa | latin america | latin america | asia | asia | melanesia | melanesia | social policy | social policy | urban | urban | rural | rural | SP.457J | SP.457J | WMN.457J | WMN.457J | SP.457 | SP.457 | WMN.457 | WMN.457

License

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11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to International Development Planning (MIT)

Description

This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world. This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law and institutions in development, privatization, participatory planning, decentralization, poverty, urban-rural linkages, corruption and civil service reform, trade and outsourcing, labor standards, post-conflict development, and the role of aid in development. The course will illuminate current development challenges through published research in the field. The literature is rich, and across many disciplines in the social sciences. Case studies and real world examples through interaction with planning practitioners are drawn from around the world.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

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EC.S06 Prototypes to Products (MIT) EC.S06 Prototypes to Products (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. For students and teams who have started a sustainable-development project in D-Lab (EC.701J or EC.720J), Product Engineering Processes (2.009), or elsewhere, this class provides a setting to continue developing projects for field implementation. Topics covered include prototyping techniques, materials selection, design-for-manufacturing, field-testing, and project management. All classwork will directly relate to the students' projects, and the instructor will consult on the projects during weekly lab time. There are no exams. Teams are encouraged to enroll together. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. For students and teams who have started a sustainable-development project in D-Lab (EC.701J or EC.720J), Product Engineering Processes (2.009), or elsewhere, this class provides a setting to continue developing projects for field implementation. Topics covered include prototyping techniques, materials selection, design-for-manufacturing, field-testing, and project management. All classwork will directly relate to the students' projects, and the instructor will consult on the projects during weekly lab time. There are no exams. Teams are encouraged to enroll together.

Subjects

solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection | SODIS | SODIS | internet kiosk | internet kiosk | developing nation | developing nation | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | prototyping | prototyping | product design | product design | Gantt chart | Gantt chart | Pert chart | Pert chart | SWOT | SWOT | funding | funding | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT) EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.025 | 11.472 | 11.472 | development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | China | China | India | India | Rwanda | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Tanzania | Africa | Africa | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | stove | stove | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | World Bank | World Bank | NGO | NGO | United Nations | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4D | ICT4C | ICT4C | microfinance | microfinance | micro-finance | micro-finance | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | wind power | wind power | solar power | solar power | biomass | biomass | biodiesel | biodiesel | biogas | biogas | agriculture | agriculture | farming | farming | food | food | green revolution | green revolution | millenium development goals | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships

Description

Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships, is a free course that introduces you to the diagramming techniques of Influence diagrams, Multiple Cause Diagrams and Cognitive Maps. Using a case study project based in Africa, this unit illustrates the powerful use of systems diagramming for international development management. This is a companion course to Diagramming for development 1: bounding realities. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships, is a free course that introduces you to the diagramming techniques of Influence diagrams, Multiple Cause Diagrams and Cognitive Maps. Using a case study project based in Africa, this unit illustrates the powerful use of systems diagramming for international development management. This is a companion course to Diagramming for development 1: bounding realities. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Diagramming for development 2 - Exploring interrelationships. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Systems (Computer) | Systems (Computer) | diagramming | diagramming

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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ES.SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT) ES.SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa.

Subjects

Information | Information | information technology | information technology | communication | communication | communication technology | communication technology | innovation | innovation | Africa | Africa | international development | international development | international aid | international aid | policy | policy | ESG.SP259 | ESG.SP259

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Understanding international development

Description

This free course introduces and explores international development by considering the three themes referred to as PASH - Power and Agency Scale and History

Subjects

International Development | PASH | Agency | scales | history | TD223_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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