Searching for key : 2160 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86

How likely is civil war in Turkey? More rights rather than borders could satisfy many Kurds How likely is civil war in Turkey? More rights rather than borders could satisfy many Kurds

Description

Is Turkey on the brink of civil war, given the recent violence against the country’s Kurdish population?  How is this violence in Turkey related to broader events both in the Middle East and Europe? A major reason behind the recent violence in Turkey is that the Kurds experienced a recent political success in Turkey’s election in 2015: the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) prevented President Erdogan from realising his dream to create an executive presidential system in Turkey, which would have implied taking more power from the parliament. At the same time, although Kurds have been immediate victims of the ... The post How likely is civil war in Turkey? More rights rather than borders could satisfy many Kurds appeared first on OxPol. Is Turkey on the brink of civil war, given the recent violence against the country’s Kurdish population?  How is this violence in Turkey related to broader events both in the Middle East and Europe? A major reason behind the recent violence in Turkey is that the Kurds experienced a recent political success in Turkey’s election in 2015: the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) prevented President Erdogan from realising his dream to create an executive presidential system in Turkey, which would have implied taking more power from the parliament. At the same time, although Kurds have been immediate victims of the ... The post How likely is civil war in Turkey? More rights rather than borders could satisfy many Kurds appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

Region | Region | The Middle East | The Middle East

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sorrento Terrace, Dalkey [and Dalkey Island] Sorrento Terrace, Dalkey [and Dalkey Island]

Description

Subjects

dalkey | dalkey | glassnegative | glassnegative | martellotower | martellotower | dalkeyisland | dalkeyisland | robertfrench | robertfrench | williamlawrence | williamlawrence | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | sorrentoterrace | sorrentoterrace | dalkeydublin | dalkeydublin | lawrencecollection | lawrencecollection | lawrencephotographicstudio | lawrencephotographicstudio | thelawrencephotographcollection | thelawrencephotographcollection

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=47290943@N03&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Street Locksmith

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: ?The owner of the stall in the accompanying photograph had, however, a different story to tell concerning keys. He possessed some keys which he would gladly sell for twopence, and he reminded me that this branch of his business was subject to certain restrictions which made him at times "lose a job or two." If keys were sold and made indiscriminately, burglars, and in fact all thieves would find easy access to other people's property. Hence certain laws were enacted with the object of preventing anyone buying keys save the rightful owners of the locks they were intended to fit. A locksmith is, therefore, not allowed to make a key from an impression. Either the lock itself must be brought to him, or the locksmith must be allowed to enter the premises and fit his key into the door. Otherwise it would suffice to obtain an impression of a key on a piece of soap or wax for a thief to procure himself a similar one, and thus open the lock protecting the coveted treasure. Further, it is illegal for a locksmith to lend a bunch of his keys; and, in a word, before exercising his art to open locks he must assure himself that his services are not required for any dishonest purpose.? For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | streetlifeinlondon | locksmith | locksmiths | keys | streetvendors | streettrade | whitechapelroad | londres | sigloxix | llaves | nios | trabajoinfantil | herreros

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

AL-58 Jones Album Image_00116

Description

Subjects

mexicana | airplane | aircraft | aviation | warner | santamaria | davis | usnavy | usn | aviator | panam | pilot | aviators | biplane | paa | americanlegion | panamerican | wooster | gott | moffett | j5 | navalaviation | unitedstatesnavy | easternairlines | whirlwind | k47 | panamericanairways | wrightwhirlwind | noeldavis | keystonepathfinder | wrightj5 | williamamoffett | williammoffett | williamadgermoffett | admiralwilliamamoffett | admiralwilliammoffett | admiralmoffett | cn3137 | keystonek47a | k47a | xabcq | noelguydavis | noelgdavis | stantonhallwooster | stantonhwooster | stanwooster | nx179 | keystoneaircraftcorporation | keystoneaircraft | keystonek47pathfinder | keystonek47 | k47pathfinder | keystoneamericanlegion | nc1612 | westindianaerialexpress | stantonwooster | edgarngott | edgargott | edwardwarner | fredalvinjones | edwardpearsonwarner | edwardpwarner

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=49487266@N07&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lt. Com. Noel Davis -- Lt. S.H. Wooster (LOC)

Description

Subjects

mexicana | airplane | aircraft | santamaria | libraryofcongress | davis | propeller | aviator | panam | aviators | biplane | paa | americanlegion | panamerican | wooster | 1927 | j5 | whirlwind | hamiltonstandard | k47 | panamericanairways | wrightwhirlwind | xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 | noeldavis | keystonepathfinder | wrightj5 | wrightj5whirlwind | cn3137 | keystonek47a | k47a | xabcq | noelguydavis | noelgdavis | stantonhallwooster | stantonhwooster | stanwooster | nx179 | keystoneaircraftcorporation | keystoneaircraft | keystonek47pathfinder | keystonek47 | k47pathfinder | keystoneamericanlegion | nc1612 | westindianaerialexpress | stantonwooster | dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain24653

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=8623220@N02&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cryptography

Description

This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that the student complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor Foundation’s MA231) before taking this course. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

computer science | cryptanalysis | ciphers | code | encryption | hash functions | rsa | public key cryptography | elliptic curve | authentication | key exchange | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cryptography

Description

This course introduces cryptography by addressing topics such as ciphers that were used before World War II, block cipher algorithms, the advanced encryption standard for a symmetric-key encryption adopted by the U.S. government, MD5 and SHA-1 hash functions, and the message authentication code. The course will focus on public key cryptography (as exemplified by the RSA algorithm), elliptic curves, the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, and the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem. The course concludes with key exchange methods, study signature schemes, and discussion of public key infrastructure. Note: It is strongly recommended that the student complete an abstract algebra course (such as the Saylor Foundation’s MA231) before taking this course. This free course may be completed onli

Subjects

computer science | cryptanalysis | ciphers | code | encryption | hash functions | rsa | public key cryptography | elliptic curve | authentication | key exchange | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Mapping Turkish International Migration Studies: Old Questions, New Challenges

Description

Prof Dr. Ahmet Icduygu, Migration Research Centre, Koc University, Istanbul, gives the first in a new series on Turkish Migration for COMPAS. Turkey has long been a major sending country of migrants and there are 3.7 million Turks and their descendants now living in the EU. However, Turkey has increasingly become a receiving and transit country for migrants. Its population is likely to grow from 75 to 90 million between now and 2050 but is already undergoing demographic transformation and has begun ageing. The Turkish economy is amongst the fastest growing in the OECD, and Turkey is becoming a strong regional power; it thus has potential to become a new gravity centre in the Mediterranean migration system. It is even suggested by some sources that Turkey should become a member of the Risin Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Turkey | BRICS | migration | Turkey | BRICS | migration | 2011-06-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129204/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT) 15.762J Supply Chain Planning (SMA 6305) (MIT)

Description

15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 15.762J focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. The course introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization. The class is recommended for Operations Management concentrators and is a first half-term subject. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA

Subjects

supply chain strategies | supply chain strategies | companies | companies | supply chain components | supply chain components | concepts and models | concepts and models | key tradeoffs and phenomena | key tradeoffs and phenomena | risk pooling and inventory placement | risk pooling and inventory placement | integrated planning and collaboration | integrated planning and collaboration | and information sharing | and information sharing | supply chain analysis and optimization | supply chain analysis and optimization | information sharing | information sharing | 15.762 | 15.762 | 1.273 | 1.273 | ESD.267 | ESD.267 | SMA 6305 | SMA 6305

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT) 6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course provides a challenging introduction to some of the central ideas of theoretical computer science. Beginning in antiquity, the course will progress through finite automata, circuits and decision trees, Turing machines and computability, efficient algorithms and reducibility, the P versus NP problem, NP-completeness, the power of randomness, cryptography and one-way functions, computational learning theory, and quantum computing. It examines the classes of problems that can and cannot be solved by various kinds of machines. It tries to explain the key differences between computational models that affect their power. This course provides a challenging introduction to some of the central ideas of theoretical computer science. Beginning in antiquity, the course will progress through finite automata, circuits and decision trees, Turing machines and computability, efficient algorithms and reducibility, the P versus NP problem, NP-completeness, the power of randomness, cryptography and one-way functions, computational learning theory, and quantum computing. It examines the classes of problems that can and cannot be solved by various kinds of machines. It tries to explain the key differences between computational models that affect their power.

Subjects

finite automata | finite automata | Turing machine | Turing machine | halting problem | halting problem | computability | computability | computational complexity | computational complexity | polynomial time | polynomial time | P | P | NP | NP | NP complete | NP complete | probabilistic algorithms | probabilistic algorithms | private-key cryptography | private-key cryptography | public-key cryptography | public-key cryptography | randomness | randomness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-6.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT) 9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT)

Description

Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning. Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning.

Subjects

vision | vision | object recognition | object recognition | monkey versus human | monkey versus human | object representations | object representations | fMRI | fMRI | temporal lobe | temporal lobe | visual cortex | visual cortex | neuronal representations | neuronal representations | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | retinal image | retinal image | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IJshockeyteam / Ice Hockey Team

Description

Subjects

hockey | icehockey | hockeyteam | canadianhockeyteam | torontogranites

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=29998366@N02&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Employee engagement Employee engagement

Description

Engagement is a key buzzword in 21st century management. Strategic human resource management rests on the belief that people are the key to achieving competitive advantage. Employees need to be seen as assets to be developed, not costs to be controlled. This free course explores three key themes: employee engagement, employee involvement and collective aspects of employee relations. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Employee engagement. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Engagement is a key buzzword in 21st century management. Strategic human resource management rests on the belief that people are the key to achieving competitive advantage. Employees need to be seen as assets to be developed, not costs to be controlled. This free course explores three key themes: employee engagement, employee involvement and collective aspects of employee relations. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Employee engagement. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Money & Management | Money & Management | BB845_1 | BB845_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Roman Empire: introducing some key terms The Roman Empire: introducing some key terms

Description

This free course, The Roman Empire: Introducing some key terms, will define basic concepts and terms that are essential for an understanding of the culture and identity of the Roman Empire. Terms such as 'Roman Empire' and 'imperium' will be introduced in the context of the formation and expansion of the empire, and the course will provide you with the background for further study of the Roman Empire. First published on Wed, 20 Jan 2016 as The Roman Empire: introducing some key terms. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, The Roman Empire: Introducing some key terms, will define basic concepts and terms that are essential for an understanding of the culture and identity of the Roman Empire. Terms such as 'Roman Empire' and 'imperium' will be introduced in the context of the formation and expansion of the empire, and the course will provide you with the background for further study of the Roman Empire. First published on Wed, 20 Jan 2016 as The Roman Empire: introducing some key terms. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Social & Economic History | Social & Economic History | social relations | social relations | AA309_1 | AA309_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Donkeys in the field Donkeys in the field

Description

Subjects

donkeys | donkeys | livestock | livestock | durban | durban | glassnegative | glassnegative | countywaterford | countywaterford | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | ahpoole | ahpoole | poolecollection | poolecollection | arthurhenripoole | arthurhenripoole | ssmaori | ssmaori | captaindaly | captaindaly | donkeyexport | donkeyexport

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

http://api.flickr.com/services/feeds/photos_public.gne?id=47290943@N03&lang=en-us&format=rss_200

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Black Jack

Description

From 'Street Life in London', 1877, by John Thomson and Adolphe Smith: "Jack stood charged with cutting and wounding the donkeys with a heavy flail-like instrument. At the request of the magistrate the instrument was put in as evidence. It was produced by the defendant from the depths of a side pocket, and proved to be a switch of about eighteen inches in length. "This is the flail, your honour," said I, ?and I own I use it for tickling Tom and Billy, my donkeys. They want no more to make 'em fly." The case was dismissed. Jack left the court with a clear conscience and an unblemished name among costers; for, although some of them may neglect their wives and families, it seems to be a point of honour with all to treat their donkeys with kindness. For the kindness bestowed the animal invariably shows its gratitude by perfect docility and willingness to bear the yoke imposed by its master. The donkeys fare like their own masters; a prosperous day will secure for them some dainty, or at least a feed without stint, of oats, beans, and hay, at a cost of eightpence or ninepence." For the full story, and other photographs and commentaries, follow this link and click through to the PDF file at the bottom of the description archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

Subjects

streetlifeinlondon | blackjack | donkey | cart | coster | costermonger

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

LSE Library | FlickR

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Integration of Brits in Turkey and Turks in Britain

Description

Ibrahim Sirkeci explores integration patterns of English-speaking movers in Turkey and those of Turkish-speaking movers in Britain International migration studies have largely focused on movers from the developing countries, or the South. Nevertheless, about one third of the global human mobility happens within the North and from North to South. Hence there is a need for reconsidering our understanding of global human mobility. Despite the hierarchy in the language used in describing these two categories of movers, there are similarities in causes, mechanisms and lived experiences. In this study, integration patterns of English-speaking movers in Turkey and those of Turkish-speaking movers in Britain have been contrasted. Particular attention has been paid to the perceived discrimination a Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

mobility | integration | Turkey | UK | mobility | integration | Turkey | UK | 2017-05-03

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129209/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Credit Crunch Live

Description

Economics students of St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford pose questions to a panel of experts about the credit crunch and global recession. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

quantitative easing | macroeconomics | credit crunch | nationalization | money | keynesian | economics | recession | banking | bail-out | businesses | fiscal policy | nationalisation | banks | keynesianism | VAT | obama | quantitative easing | macroeconomics | credit crunch | nationalization | money | keynesian | economics | recession | banking | bail-out | businesses | fiscal policy | nationalisation | banks | keynesianism | VAT | obama

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129190/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti 6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti

Subjects

human-computer interfaces | human-computer interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | human information processor | human information processor | perception | perception | Fitts's Law | Fitts's Law | color | color | hearing | hearing | task analysis | task analysis | user-centered design | user-centered design | iterative design | iterative design | low-fidelity prototyping | low-fidelity prototyping | heuristic evaluation | heuristic evaluation | keystroke-level models | keystroke-level models | formative evaluation | formative evaluation | input models | input models | output models | output models | model-view-controller | model-view-controller | toolkits | toolkits | programming project | programming project | GUI | GUI | Java | Java

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT) 21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT)

Description

"Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss "Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss

Subjects

Expository | Expository | writing | writing | food | food | thought | thought | life | life | symbol | symbol | it earth | it earth | families | families | cultures | cultures | The aroma of turkey memories | The aroma of turkey memories | chef | chef | artist | artist | family meals | family meals | art | art | science | science | cooking | cooking | fair trade | fair trade | eating disorders | eating disorders | Fast Food Nation | Fast Food Nation | films | films | videos | videos | personal narratives | personal narratives | essays | essays | research | research | workshop. | workshop.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.007J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.007J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as a focused survey of feminist political thought and theory, exploring the various and often competing ways feminists have framed discussions about sex, gender, and oppression. Beginning with a consideration of key terms (sex, gender, oppression) and the meaning of social construction, we will move on to study three central feminist approaches to political thought (humanism, gynocentrism, and dominance). The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in feminist theory, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. This course is designed as a focused survey of feminist political thought and theory, exploring the various and often competing ways feminists have framed discussions about sex, gender, and oppression. Beginning with a consideration of key terms (sex, gender, oppression) and the meaning of social construction, we will move on to study three central feminist approaches to political thought (humanism, gynocentrism, and dominance). The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in feminist theory, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | politics | politics | social construction | social construction | political thought | political thought | humanist | humanist | gynocentric | gynocentric | dominance | dominance | feminist theory | feminist theory | 17.007 | 17.007 | SP.601 | SP.601

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.885J Aircraft Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

Aircraft are complex products comprised of many subsystems which must meet demanding customer and operational lifecycle value requirements. This course adopts a holistic view of the aircraft as a system, covering: basic systems engineering; cost and weight estimation; basic aircraft performance; safety and reliability; lifecycle topics; aircraft subsystems; risk analysis and management; and system realization. Small student teams "retrospectively analyze" an existing aircraft covering: key design drivers and decisions; aircraft attributes and subsystems; and operational experience. Finally, the student teams deliver oral and written versions of the case study. Aircraft are complex products comprised of many subsystems which must meet demanding customer and operational lifecycle value requirements. This course adopts a holistic view of the aircraft as a system, covering: basic systems engineering; cost and weight estimation; basic aircraft performance; safety and reliability; lifecycle topics; aircraft subsystems; risk analysis and management; and system realization. Small student teams "retrospectively analyze" an existing aircraft covering: key design drivers and decisions; aircraft attributes and subsystems; and operational experience. Finally, the student teams deliver oral and written versions of the case study.

Subjects

aircraft systems | aircraft systems | aircraft systems engineering | aircraft systems engineering | lifecycle | lifecycle | cost estimation | cost estimation | weight estimation | weight estimation | aircraft performance | aircraft performance | aircraft safety | aircraft safety | aircraft reliability | aircraft reliability | subsystems; risk analysis | subsystems; risk analysis | risk management | risk management | system realization | system realization | retrospective analysis | retrospective analysis | key design drivers | key design drivers | design drivers | design drivers | design decisions | design decisions | aircraft attributes | aircraft attributes | operational experience | operational experience | case study | case study | case studies | case studies | air transportation systems | air transportation systems | air defense system | air defense system | systems engineering | systems engineering | interface management | interface management | interface verification | interface verification | subsystem architecture | subsystem architecture | performance issures | performance issures | design closure | design closure | complex systems | complex systems | 16.885 | 16.885 | ESD.35 | ESD.35

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata