Searching for legislature : 23 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Volodin’s Duma: Do Volodin’s reforms go much beyond symbolic PR? Volodin’s Duma: Do Volodin’s reforms go much beyond symbolic PR?

Description

Vyacheslav Volodin has big plans for the State Duma. Since his October 5 election, the new chairman of the Federal Assembly’s lower chamber has directed a raft of changes aimed, it seems, at improving the Duma’s political stature. These reforms touch on all the core functions of legislatures: representation and linkage; executive oversight and control; and policy-making. The past proliferation of derogatory monikers like “rubber stamp,” “rabid printer,” and legal “conveyor” belt reflect the popular perception that the contemporary Russian federal legislature is an ineffectual institution – a body stuffed with inactive deputies, whose task is simply to distract citizens from real decision-making processes. ... Vyacheslav Volodin has big plans for the State Duma. Since his October 5 election, the new chairman of the Federal Assembly’s lower chamber has directed a raft of changes aimed, it seems, at improving the Duma’s political stature. These reforms touch on all the core functions of legislatures: representation and linkage; executive oversight and control; and policy-making. The past proliferation of derogatory monikers like “rubber stamp,” “rabid printer,” and legal “conveyor” belt reflect the popular perception that the contemporary Russian federal legislature is an ineffectual institution – a body stuffed with inactive deputies, whose task is simply to distract citizens from real decision-making processes. ...

Subjects

Duma | Duma | Putin | Putin | Russia | Russia

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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | political economy | rational choice | rational choice | legislature | legislature | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | court | court | and elections | and elections | electoral competition | electoral competition | comparative | comparative | international | international | public goods | public goods | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | multiparty competition | electoral system | electoral system | voter | voter | agency models | agency models | models of political parties | models of political parties | point-valued solution | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | minorities | minorities | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | government stability | government stability | informational theory | informational theory | distributive theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | representative democracy | direct democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Parliaments and the defence of democracy Parliaments and the defence of democracy

Description

National legislatures too frequently pass legislation limiting freedom and democracy. To change this requires not just training, but also an appeal to the personal incentives of individual MPs. The last few years have not been good to democracy. According to the US think tank Freedom House, 2014 saw a “disturbing decline in global freedom”, with twice as many countries suffering democratic declines as enjoying democratic gains. This problem has not been contained in one region, but has proved to be a much broader phenomenon, from campaigns against media freedom in Egypt and Turkey to homophobic legislation in Africa and sustained conflict ... The post Parliaments and the defence of democracy appeared first on OxPol. National legislatures too frequently pass legislation limiting freedom and democracy. To change this requires not just training, but also an appeal to the personal incentives of individual MPs. The last few years have not been good to democracy. According to the US think tank Freedom House, 2014 saw a “disturbing decline in global freedom”, with twice as many countries suffering democratic declines as enjoying democratic gains. This problem has not been contained in one region, but has proved to be a much broader phenomenon, from campaigns against media freedom in Egypt and Turkey to homophobic legislation in Africa and sustained conflict ... The post Parliaments and the defence of democracy appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

Africa | Africa | legislatures | legislatures | parliaments | parliaments

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A declaration of the people's natural right to a share in the legislature: which is the fundamental principle of the British constitution of state. By Granville Sharp. A declaration of the people's natural right to a share in the legislature: which is the fundamental principle of the British constitution of state. By Granville Sharp.

Description

ebook version of A declaration of the people's natural right to a share in the legislature: which is the fundamental principle of the British constitution of state. By Granville Sharp. ebook version of A declaration of the people's natural right to a share in the legislature: which is the fundamental principle of the British constitution of state. By Granville Sharp.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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17.261 Congress and the American Political System II (MIT) 17.261 Congress and the American Political System II (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes the development of the United States Congress by focusing on the competing theoretical lenses through which legislatures have been studied. In particular, it compares sociological and economic models of legislative behavior, applying those models to floor decision-making, committee behavior, political parties, relations with other branches of the Federal government, and elections. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes the development of the United States Congress by focusing on the competing theoretical lenses through which legislatures have been studied. In particular, it compares sociological and economic models of legislative behavior, applying those models to floor decision-making, committee behavior, political parties, relations with other branches of the Federal government, and elections. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | congress | congress | American | American | system | system | theory | theory | legislature | legislature | sociological models | sociological models | economic models | economic models | legislative behavior | legislative behavior | floor decision-making | floor decision-making | committee behavior | committee behavior | political parties | political parties | relations | relations | Federal government | Federal government | elections | elections

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT) 11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning. This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning.

Subjects

environmental governance | environmental governance | local roles | local roles | government | government | NGO's | NGO's | social movement mobilization | social movement mobilization | collaboration | collaboration | local and state government | local and state government | pollution | pollution | toxins | toxins | legislature | legislature | governance | governance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | economics | political economy | democratic | countries | collective | choice | electoral competiton | public goods | size | government | taxation | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | voting models | equilibrium models | information | learning | agency models | political parties | vote-buying | vote-trading | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | lobbying | legislatures | bargaining | coalitions | stability | informational | distributive | theories | executive | relations | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | rational choice | legislature | bureaucracy | court | and elections | electoral competition | comparative | international | public goods | government | taxation | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | electoral system | voter | agency models | models of political parties | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | minorities | interest groups | lobbying | bargaining | coalitions | government stability | informational theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.261 Congress and the American Political System II (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes the development of the United States Congress by focusing on the competing theoretical lenses through which legislatures have been studied. In particular, it compares sociological and economic models of legislative behavior, applying those models to floor decision-making, committee behavior, political parties, relations with other branches of the Federal government, and elections. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

Political science | congress | American | system | theory | legislature | sociological models | economic models | legislative behavior | floor decision-making | committee behavior | political parties | relations | Federal government | elections

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT) 11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays. This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | policymaking | policymaking | law | law | legislature | legislature | social problems | social problems | power and wealth | power and wealth | problem solving | problem solving | direct democracy | direct democracy | consensus building | consensus building | regulatory negotiation | regulatory negotiation | politics | politics | political writing | political writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT) 11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning. This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning.

Subjects

environmental governance | environmental governance | local roles | local roles | government | government | NGO's | NGO's | social movement mobilization | social movement mobilization | collaboration | collaboration | local and state government | local and state government | pollution | pollution | toxins | toxins | legislature | legislature | governance | governance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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‘English Votes for English Laws’ — a viable answer to the English Question? ‘English Votes for English Laws’ — a viable answer to the English Question?

Description

Last week the government published its detailed proposals for introducing English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) into the House of Commons. This is a significant moment in our constitutional history primarily because these changes reflect the acceptance of the need to institutionalise a collective English interest in the legislature, and the conviction that there is a growing and legitimate sense of grievance concerning England’s position within the UK. The primary rationale offered for introducing EVEL is to bring Westminster up to date with the implications of devolution elsewhere within the UK. In a context where further devolution is anticipated for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, it is becoming harder to ignore demands that English interests be given greater consideration in pa Last week the government published its detailed proposals for introducing English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) into the House of Commons. This is a significant moment in our constitutional history primarily because these changes reflect the acceptance of the need to institutionalise a collective English interest in the legislature, and the conviction that there is a growing and legitimate sense of grievance concerning England’s position within the UK. The primary rationale offered for introducing EVEL is to bring Westminster up to date with the implications of devolution elsewhere within the UK. In a context where further devolution is anticipated for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, it is becoming harder to ignore demands that English interests be given greater consideration in pa

Subjects

British Politics | British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | Great Charter Convention | Great Charter Convention | Law | Law | Political Science | Political Science

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Russians will be voting on Sunday. Here’s what you need to know Russians will be voting on Sunday. Here’s what you need to know

Description

Russian voters will elect 450 deputies to Russia’s State Duma on Sunday, in the seventh election for the lower chamber of Russia’s bicameral Federal Assembly since the legislature’s founding in 1993. Large-scale protests followed the last federal parliamentary elections on Dec. 4, 2011, after widespread reports of electoral fraud and rigged elections. Within days, an estimated 50,000 protesters across from the Kremlin were chanting “Russia without Putin.” This year, 14 political parties are taking part in elections that were moved forward from December to September. Observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe will monitor the elections, which will return to a mixed electoral system last used in ... Russian voters will elect 450 deputies to Russia’s State Duma on Sunday, in the seventh election for the lower chamber of Russia’s bicameral Federal Assembly since the legislature’s founding in 1993. Large-scale protests followed the last federal parliamentary elections on Dec. 4, 2011, after widespread reports of electoral fraud and rigged elections. Within days, an estimated 50,000 protesters across from the Kremlin were chanting “Russia without Putin.” This year, 14 political parties are taking part in elections that were moved forward from December to September. Observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe will monitor the elections, which will return to a mixed electoral system last used in ...

Subjects

Duma | Duma | Elections | Elections | Putin | Putin | Russia | Russia

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Senator reacts to reapportionment map - Tallahassee

Description

Subjects

florida | senator | maps | van | tallahassee | legislature | legislators | dietsoftdrinks | vanpoole | reapportionmentmaps

License

No known copyright restrictions

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The UK government says no to democratic reform

Description

Within hours of the general election Whitehall started making new MPs irrelevant. Even before the new parliament has heard the Queen's Speech, Whitehall has begun to treat the legitimate and elected part of our political settlement with contempt by abolishing an effective part of parliamentary scrutiny, the Political and Constitutional Reform Select Committee. New MPs will of course know of the battle between parties, but there is also an historic, never ending democratic battle - regardless of party - between the executive (government) and legislature (parliament). It is an uneven battle which - while not covered in new MPs' induction packs - those who think beyond the tribal will soon become familiar with. It often transcends partisanship since all parties who aspire to run government

Subjects

British Politics | Democracy and Elections | Great Charter Convention | Law

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Two unidentified men on opening day of the Legislature in Tallahassee, Florida

Description

Subjects

florida | beards | photographers | cameras | canes | 1950s | tallahassee | unidentified | leoncounty | statelibraryandarchivesofflorida | floridahistoriccapitol | floridastatelegislature | tallahasseedemocrattallahasseefloridanewspaper | vision:text=0637

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Presidential Proxies: Cloaked Law-making in Contemporary Russia

Description

The Russian newspaper Vedomosti recently reported something that may strike many as rather odd. Drawing on a range of internal sources, the paper claimed that the Russian Presidential Administration was increasingly using members of the Federation Council ? the upper chamber of the Federal Assembly, whose members are colloquially referred to as ?senators? ? to introduce bills into the federal legislature. This use of senators as law-making proxies is puzzling because of the President?s formal law-making powers: According to article 104, section 1 of the Russian Constitution, the President of the Russian Federation has the ?power to initiate legislation?. In ...

Subjects

European Politics and Society | Duma | Kremlin | Russia | Vladimir Putin

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Introduction to Comparative Politics

Description

Comparative politics is the systematic study and comparison of the world’s political systems. The course begins by discussing the factors and categories of analysis that political scientists and important international institutions like the World Bank, NATO, and the United Nations use regularly; it ends by comparing and contrasting governments from five different regions of the world: the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Political Science 221)

Subjects

sovereignty | democracy | political rights | elections | constitution | parliamentary | legislatures | confederation | federalism | consensus | majoritarian | bureaucracy | civil society | lobbying | media | voting | policy | economy | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Collections of learning content on 'Comparative Government'

Description

An aggregation of OER, blog posts and podcasts based around the topic of "Political theory"

Subjects

comparative government | comparative politics | political parties | party systems | political executives | legislatures | electoral systems | bureaucracies | federalism | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays.

Subjects

public policy | policymaking | law | legislature | social problems | power and wealth | problem solving | direct democracy | consensus building | regulatory negotiation | politics | political writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning.

Subjects

environmental governance | local roles | government | NGO's | social movement mobilization | collaboration | local and state government | pollution | toxins | legislature | governance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.363 Civil Society and the Environment (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar examines civic engagement in international, national and local environmental governance. We will consider theories pertaining to civil society development, social movement mobilization, and the relations that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have with governments and corporations. During the course of the semester, particular attention will be given to the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs. Case studies of NGO and community responses to specific environmental issues will be used to illustrate theoretical issues and assess the impacts that these actors have on environmental policy and planning.

Subjects

environmental governance | local roles | government | NGO's | social movement mobilization | collaboration | local and state government | pollution | toxins | legislature | governance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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