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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification. Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | literate | literate | critical | critical | consumers | consumers | producers | producers | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | comparative | comparative | historical | historical | lens | lens | the course defines oral | the course defines oral | print | print | performance | performance | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | digital | digital | cultural | cultural | forms | forms | practices | practices | mediated communication | mediated communication | functions | functions | society | society | network culture | network culture | media convergence | media convergence | Intellectual Property | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | peer2peer authoring | blogging | blogging | game modification | game modification | lens | the course defines oral | lens | the course defines oral

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with experiments working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition. This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with experiments working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition.

Subjects

mass communication | mass communication | mass film | mass film | television | television | video games | video games | recorded music | recorded music | digital media | digital media | multimedia | multimedia | media literacy | media literacy | social media | social media | media convergence | media convergence

License

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of culture. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, theatrical, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. Over the course of the semester we explore different theoretical perspectives on the role and power of media in society in influencing our social values, political beliefs, identities

Subjects

literature | literature | comparative mass media | comparative mass media | communication | communication | modern culture | modern culture | social values | social values | politics | politics | radio | radio | television | television | film | film | print | print | digital techonology | digital techonology | history | history | storytelling | storytelling | advertising | advertising | oral | oral | culture | culture | photography | photography | oral culture | oral culture | cultural forms | cultural forms | political beliefs | political beliefs | economics | economics | mediated communication | mediated communication | class politics | class politics | gender | gender | race | race | identity | identity | behavior | behavior | criticism | criticism | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | consumers | consumers | theatrical | theatrical | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | cinema | cinema | theatre | theatre | printing | printing | publishing | publishing | books | books | electronic | electronic | transformations | transformations | narrative | narrative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The use of citizen journalism by traditional media The use of citizen journalism by traditional media

Description

Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks

Subjects

traditional | traditional | mainstream | mainstream | readers | readers | media | media | social | social | journalism | journalism | newman | newman | digital | digital | citizen | citizen | content | content | tools | tools | networks | networks | people | people | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20 | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT) CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll

Subjects

new media | new media | literacy | literacy | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | comparative media | comparative media | western literacy | western literacy | social turn | social turn | media production | media production | media use | media use | media interpretation | media interpretation | literacy production | literacy production

License

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1.34 Waste Containment and Remediation Technology (MIT) 1.34 Waste Containment and Remediation Technology (MIT)

Description

1.34 focuses on the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, with specific emphasis on the design of land-based waste containment structures and hazardous waste remediation. Topics include: introduction to hazardous waste, definition of hazardous waste, regulatory requirements, waste characteristics, geo-chemistry, and contaminant transport; the design and operation of waste containment structures, landfills, impoundments, and mine-waste disposal; the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites, the superfund law, preliminary site assessment, site investigation techniques, and remediation technologies; and monitoring requirements. 1.34 focuses on the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, with specific emphasis on the design of land-based waste containment structures and hazardous waste remediation. Topics include: introduction to hazardous waste, definition of hazardous waste, regulatory requirements, waste characteristics, geo-chemistry, and contaminant transport; the design and operation of waste containment structures, landfills, impoundments, and mine-waste disposal; the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites, the superfund law, preliminary site assessment, site investigation techniques, and remediation technologies; and monitoring requirements.

Subjects

waste containment | waste containment | waste remediation | waste remediation | soil remediation | soil remediation | groundwater remediation | groundwater remediation | contaminated site | contaminated site | contamination | contamination | waste disposal | waste disposal | mass transport | mass transport | Superfund | Superfund | EPA | EPA | USGS | USGS | air sparging | air sparging | air stripper | air stripper | bioremediation | bioremediation | soil vapor extraction | soil vapor extraction | SVE | SVE | pump and treat | pump and treat | landfill | landfill | leachate | leachate | chlorinated solvent | chlorinated solvent | NAPL | NAPL | LNAPL | LNAPL | DNAPL | DNAPL | TCE | TCE | PCE | PCE | risk assessment | risk assessment | soil liner | soil liner | clay liner | clay liner | geomembrane | geomembrane | brownfield | brownfield | remediation technologies | remediation technologies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots? Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots? Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots? Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots?

Description

The media plays a huge part in sport; we find out what's happening and how our team is doing, and it creates great sporting moments and sports celebrities and stars. This free course, Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots?, looks at the role played by the media in sport and how this has changed with the development of internet and satellite TV. Who calls the shots: athletes, teams or the media moguls? How do social scientists explain this relationship between sport and the media? First published on Thu, 03 Mar 2016 as Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The media plays a huge part in sport; we find out what's happening and how our team is doing, and it creates great sporting moments and sports celebrities and stars. This free course, Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots?, looks at the role played by the media in sport and how this has changed with the development of internet and satellite TV. Who calls the shots: athletes, teams or the media moguls? How do social scientists explain this relationship between sport and the media? First published on Thu, 03 Mar 2016 as Sport media and culture: Who's calling the shots?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Sport | Sport | celebrity | celebrity | D170_1 | D170_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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CMS.930 Media, Education, and the Marketplace (MIT) CMS.930 Media, Education, and the Marketplace (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. How can we harness the emerging forms of interactive media to enhance the learning process? Professor Miyagawa and prominent guest speakers will explore a broad range of issues on new media and learning - technical, social, and business. Concrete examples of use of media will be presented as case studies. One major theme, though not the only one, is that today's youth, influenced by video games and other emerging interactive media forms, are acquiring a fundamentally different attitude towards media. Media is, for them, not something to be consumed, but also to be created. This has broad consequences for how we design media, how the young are taught in schools, and how mass media markets will need to adjust. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. How can we harness the emerging forms of interactive media to enhance the learning process? Professor Miyagawa and prominent guest speakers will explore a broad range of issues on new media and learning - technical, social, and business. Concrete examples of use of media will be presented as case studies. One major theme, though not the only one, is that today's youth, influenced by video games and other emerging interactive media forms, are acquiring a fundamentally different attitude towards media. Media is, for them, not something to be consumed, but also to be created. This has broad consequences for how we design media, how the young are taught in schools, and how mass media markets will need to adjust.

Subjects

educational technology | educational technology | media design | media design | 21F.034 | 21F.034

License

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Redes Multimedia Redes Multimedia

Description

La asignatura Redes Multimedia cubre una temática clave: habiéndose explicado los fundamentos de la arquitectura de la red Internet en asignaturas anteriores, en esta asignatura se aborda el problema específico de emplear dicha red para transmitir contenidos multimedia. Dado que la red Internet fue concebida inicialmente para transmitir datos, su arquitectura no está bien adaptada para los requisitos de las aplicaciones multimedia. Para abordar el problema de transmitir contenido multimedia a través de una red que no está bien adaptada a sus requisitos, en la asignatura se consideran dos paradigmas: (i) evolucionar la arquitectura de la red Internet para adaptarla a los requisitos de las aplicaciones multimedia; y (ii) adaptar las aplicaciones, incorporando mecanismos para el transpo La asignatura Redes Multimedia cubre una temática clave: habiéndose explicado los fundamentos de la arquitectura de la red Internet en asignaturas anteriores, en esta asignatura se aborda el problema específico de emplear dicha red para transmitir contenidos multimedia. Dado que la red Internet fue concebida inicialmente para transmitir datos, su arquitectura no está bien adaptada para los requisitos de las aplicaciones multimedia. Para abordar el problema de transmitir contenido multimedia a través de una red que no está bien adaptada a sus requisitos, en la asignatura se consideran dos paradigmas: (i) evolucionar la arquitectura de la red Internet para adaptarla a los requisitos de las aplicaciones multimedia; y (ii) adaptar las aplicaciones, incorporando mecanismos para el transpo

Subjects

éneas | éneas | Best Effort | Best Effort | ía de Sistemas Audiovisuales | ía de Sistemas Audiovisuales | DiffServ | DiffServ | 2016 | 2016 | Aplicaciones interactivas | Aplicaciones interactivas | Aplicaciones streaming | Aplicaciones streaming | Multimedia Caching | Multimedia Caching | Ingenieria Telematica | Ingenieria Telematica | Torre de Protocolos | Torre de Protocolos | ón Bajo Demanda | ón Bajo Demanda | Factores de Red | Factores de Red | Aplicaciones Multimedia | Aplicaciones Multimedia | Internet | Internet | ío | ío | ámetros de Red | ámetros de Red | ón de Contenidos | ón de Contenidos | Red | Red | IP Multicast | IP Multicast

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21W.763J Transmedia Storytelling: Modern Science Fiction (MIT) 21W.763J Transmedia Storytelling: Modern Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

Transmedia narratives exist across multiple storytelling platforms, using the advantages of each to enhance the experience of the audience. No matter which medium nor how many, the heart of any successful transmedia project is a good story. In this class we will spend time on the basics of solid storytelling in speculative fiction before we move on to how to translate those elements into various media. We will then explore how different presentations in different media can complement and enhance our storytelling. While we will read scholarly articles and discuss ideas about transmedia, this is primarily a class in making speculative fiction transmedia projects. We will analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various mediums and consider how they complement each other, and how by using Transmedia narratives exist across multiple storytelling platforms, using the advantages of each to enhance the experience of the audience. No matter which medium nor how many, the heart of any successful transmedia project is a good story. In this class we will spend time on the basics of solid storytelling in speculative fiction before we move on to how to translate those elements into various media. We will then explore how different presentations in different media can complement and enhance our storytelling. While we will read scholarly articles and discuss ideas about transmedia, this is primarily a class in making speculative fiction transmedia projects. We will analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various mediums and consider how they complement each other, and how by using

Subjects

21W.763 | 21W.763 | transmedia | transmedia | scifi | scifi | kitsch | kitsch | zombies | zombies | storytelling | storytelling | narrative | narrative | workshop | workshop | speculative | speculative | fiction | fiction

License

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SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.635 Advanced Electromagnetism (MIT) 6.635 Advanced Electromagnetism (MIT)

Description

In 6.635, topics covered include: special relativity, electrodynamics of moving media, waves in dispersive media, microstrip integrated circuits, quantum optics, remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, scattering by rough surfaces, effective permittivities, random media, Green's functions for planarly layered media, integral equations in electromagnetics, method of moments, time domain method of moments, EM waves in periodic structures: photonic crystals and negative refraction. In 6.635, topics covered include: special relativity, electrodynamics of moving media, waves in dispersive media, microstrip integrated circuits, quantum optics, remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, scattering by rough surfaces, effective permittivities, random media, Green's functions for planarly layered media, integral equations in electromagnetics, method of moments, time domain method of moments, EM waves in periodic structures: photonic crystals and negative refraction.

Subjects

electromagnetism | electromagnetism | special relativity | special relativity | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | waves | waves | dispersive media | dispersive media | microstrip integrated circuits | microstrip integrated circuits | quantum optics | quantum optics | remote sensing | remote sensing | radiative transfer theory | radiative transfer theory | scattering | scattering | effective permittivities | effective permittivities | random media | random media | Green's functions | Green's functions | planarly layered media | planarly layered media | integral equations | integral equations | method of moments | method of moments | time domain method of moments | time domain method of moments | EM waves | EM waves | periodic structures | periodic structures | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | negative refraction | negative refraction

License

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Social media is changing our digital news habits – but to varying degrees in US and UK Social media is changing our digital news habits – but to varying degrees in US and UK

Description

Digital technology has dramatically reshaped the news and media industries in the past decade. We’ve left behind a world where established news brands could rely on reaching large audiences and hence secure advertising revenues. Now there is huge uncertainty about business models, even as digital gives consumers more convenient access to news than ever before. The emergence of new players, including BuzzFeed and The Huffington Post, coupled with the growth of social networking, the introduction of smartphones and the evolution of online advertising, have contributed to a media landscape that is changing at considerable speed. We’ve been tracking the ways ... Digital technology has dramatically reshaped the news and media industries in the past decade. We’ve left behind a world where established news brands could rely on reaching large audiences and hence secure advertising revenues. Now there is huge uncertainty about business models, even as digital gives consumers more convenient access to news than ever before. The emergence of new players, including BuzzFeed and The Huffington Post, coupled with the growth of social networking, the introduction of smartphones and the evolution of online advertising, have contributed to a media landscape that is changing at considerable speed. We’ve been tracking the ways ...

Subjects

Ad blocking | Ad blocking | digital media | digital media | Journalism | Journalism | Media | Media | news | news | online media | online media | online news | online news | Social Media | Social Media | UK journalism | UK journalism | UK media | UK media | US journalism | US journalism | US media | US media

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

This course provides a critical analysis of mass media in our culture. Various types of media such as books, films, video games, and online interactions will be discussed and reviewed. This course will also evaluate how information and ideas travel between people on a large scale. This course provides a critical analysis of mass media in our culture. Various types of media such as books, films, video games, and online interactions will be discussed and reviewed. This course will also evaluate how information and ideas travel between people on a large scale.

Subjects

mass communication | mass communication | mass film | mass film | television | television | video games | video games | recorded music | recorded music | digital media | digital media | multimedia | multimedia | media literacy | media literacy | social media | social media | media convergence | media convergence

License

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13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics (MIT) 13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics (MIT)

Description

This course examines wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media, wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides, and Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for propagation in plane-stratified media. Also covered are Seismo-Acoustic modeling of seabeds and ice covers, seismic interface and surface waves in a stratified seabed, Parabolic Equation and Coupled Mode approaches to propagation in range-dependent ocean waveguides, numerical modeling of target scattering and reverberation clutter in ocean waveguides, and ocean ambient noise modeling. Students develop propagation models using all the numerical approaches relevant to state-of-the-art acoustic research. This course examines wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media, wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides, and Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for propagation in plane-stratified media. Also covered are Seismo-Acoustic modeling of seabeds and ice covers, seismic interface and surface waves in a stratified seabed, Parabolic Equation and Coupled Mode approaches to propagation in range-dependent ocean waveguides, numerical modeling of target scattering and reverberation clutter in ocean waveguides, and ocean ambient noise modeling. Students develop propagation models using all the numerical approaches relevant to state-of-the-art acoustic research.

Subjects

Wave equations | Wave equations | fluid and visco-elastic media | fluid and visco-elastic media | Wave-theory formulations | Wave-theory formulations | acoustic source radiation | acoustic source radiation | seismo-acoustic propagation | seismo-acoustic propagation | stratified ocean waveguides | stratified ocean waveguides | Wavenumber Integration | Wavenumber Integration | Normal Mode | Normal Mode | propagation in plane-stratified media | propagation in plane-stratified media | Seismo-Acoustic modeling | Seismo-Acoustic modeling | Seismic interface | Seismic interface | surface waves | surface waves | stratified seabed | stratified seabed | Parabolic Equation | Parabolic Equation | Coupled Mode | Coupled Mode | range-dependent ocean waveguides | range-dependent ocean waveguides | Numerical modeling | Numerical modeling | target scattering | target scattering | reverberation clutter | reverberation clutter | Ocean ambient noise modeling | Ocean ambient noise modeling | Fluid media | Fluid media | visco-elastic media | visco-elastic media | plane-stratified media | plane-stratified media | ice covers | ice covers | 2.068 | 2.068

License

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WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.068 Computational Ocean Acoustics (13.853) (MIT) 2.068 Computational Ocean Acoustics (13.853) (MIT)

Description

This course examines wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media, wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides, and Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for propagation in plane-stratified media. Also covered are Seismo-Acoustic modeling of seabeds and ice covers, seismic interface and surface waves in a stratified seabed, Parabolic Equation and Coupled Mode approaches to propagation in range-dependent ocean waveguides, numerical modeling of target scattering and reverberation clutter in ocean waveguides, and ocean ambient noise modeling. Students develop propagation models using all the numerical approaches relevant to state-of-the-art acoustic research. This course was originally offered in Course 13 ( This course examines wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media, wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides, and Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for propagation in plane-stratified media. Also covered are Seismo-Acoustic modeling of seabeds and ice covers, seismic interface and surface waves in a stratified seabed, Parabolic Equation and Coupled Mode approaches to propagation in range-dependent ocean waveguides, numerical modeling of target scattering and reverberation clutter in ocean waveguides, and ocean ambient noise modeling. Students develop propagation models using all the numerical approaches relevant to state-of-the-art acoustic research. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (

Subjects

Wave equations | Wave equations | fluid and visco-elastic media | fluid and visco-elastic media | Wave-theory formulations | Wave-theory formulations | acoustic source radiation | acoustic source radiation | seismo-acoustic propagation | seismo-acoustic propagation | stratified ocean waveguides | stratified ocean waveguides | Wavenumber Integration | Wavenumber Integration | Normal Mode | Normal Mode | propagation in plane-stratified media | propagation in plane-stratified media | Seismo-Acoustic modeling | Seismo-Acoustic modeling | Seismic interface | Seismic interface | surface waves | surface waves | stratified seabed | stratified seabed | Parabolic Equation | Parabolic Equation | Coupled Mode | Coupled Mode | range-dependent ocean waveguides | range-dependent ocean waveguides | Numerical modeling | Numerical modeling | target scattering | target scattering | reverberation clutter | reverberation clutter | Ocean ambient noise modeling | Ocean ambient noise modeling | Fluid media | Fluid media | visco-elastic media | visco-elastic media | plane-stratified media | plane-stratified media | ice covers | ice covers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.302 BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts (MIT) 4.302 BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

This class offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis is on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Students will learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, and three-dimensional, and time-based media, including installations, performance and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice. This class offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis is on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Students will learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, and three-dimensional, and time-based media, including installations, performance and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice.

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | architecture | architecture | architectural practice | architectural practice | two-dimensional media | two-dimensional media | three-dimensional media | three-dimensional media | 2D media | 2D media | 3D media | 3D media | sculpture | sculpture | performance | performance | video | video

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.701 Current Debates in Media (MIT) CMS.701 Current Debates in Media (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This class addresses important, current debates in media with in-depth discussion of popular perceptions and policy implications. Students will engage in the critical study of the economic, political, social, and cultural significance of media, and learn to identify, analyze, and understand the complex relations among media texts, policies, institutions, industries, and infrastructures. This class offers the opportunity to discuss, in stimulating and challenging ways, topics such as ideology, propaganda, net neutrality, big data, digital hacktivism, digital rebellion, media violence, gamification, collective intelligence, participatory culture, intellectual property, artificial intelligence, etc., from historical, transcultural, and multi Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This class addresses important, current debates in media with in-depth discussion of popular perceptions and policy implications. Students will engage in the critical study of the economic, political, social, and cultural significance of media, and learn to identify, analyze, and understand the complex relations among media texts, policies, institutions, industries, and infrastructures. This class offers the opportunity to discuss, in stimulating and challenging ways, topics such as ideology, propaganda, net neutrality, big data, digital hacktivism, digital rebellion, media violence, gamification, collective intelligence, participatory culture, intellectual property, artificial intelligence, etc., from historical, transcultural, and multi

Subjects

mass media | mass media | economics | economics | politics | politics | ideology | ideology | propaganda | propaganda | net neutrality | net neutrality | big data | big data | digital hacktivism | digital hacktivism | digital rebellion | digital rebellion | media violence | media violence | gamification | gamification | collective intelligence | collective intelligence | participatory culture | participatory culture | intellectual property | intellectual property | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | gender studies | gender studies | gaming | gaming | video games | video games

License

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | literate | critical | consumers | producers | interdisciplinary | comparative | historical | lens | the course defines oral | print | performance | photographic | broadcast | cinematic | digital | cultural | forms | practices | mediated communication | functions | society | network culture | media convergence | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | blogging | game modification | lens | the course defines oral

License

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21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Serial Storytelling (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Culture and Narrative: Serial Storytelling (MIT)

Description

Serial Storytelling examines the ways the passing and unfolding of time structures narratives in a range of media. From Rembrandt's lifetime of self-portraits to The Wire, Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers to contemporary journalism and reportage, we will focus on the relationships between popular culture and art, the problems of evaluation and audience, and the ways these works function within their social context. Serial Storytelling examines the ways the passing and unfolding of time structures narratives in a range of media. From Rembrandt's lifetime of self-portraits to The Wire, Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers to contemporary journalism and reportage, we will focus on the relationships between popular culture and art, the problems of evaluation and audience, and the ways these works function within their social context.

Subjects

serial | serial | storytelling | storytelling | narrative | narrative | seriality | seriality | Tennyson | Tennyson | memoriam | memoriam | wire | wire | David Simon | David Simon | Rembrandt | Rembrandt | self-portraits | self-portraits | blackbird | blackbird | Wallace Stevens | Wallace Stevens | Omar | Omar | Auden | Auden | Goya | Goya | Disasters of War | Disasters of War | War | War | Hogarth | Hogarth | Superman | Superman | Myth of Superman | Myth of Superman | Myth of Sisyphus | Myth of Sisyphus | Myth of Fingerprints | Myth of Fingerprints | photography | photography | Muybridge | Muybridge | Edweard | Edweard | Edweird | Edweird | Leland Stanford | Leland Stanford | Camp Stanford | Camp Stanford | Duchamp | Duchamp | Nude Descending | Nude Descending | Nude Ascending | Nude Ascending | Nude Suspended | Nude Suspended | journalism | journalism | animals eating people | animals eating people | Orwell | Orwell | Art is Propaganda | Art is Propaganda | McLuhan | McLuhan | Elegy | Elegy | Mourning | Mourning | Morte D'Arthur | Morte D'Arthur | Epic | Epic | Dickens | Dickens | Pickwick | Pickwick | Bleak House | Bleak House | Sherlock | Sherlock | Holmes | Holmes | Slaughterhouse | Slaughterhouse | Literature | Literature | Murder | Murder | English Murder | English Murder | Portlandia | Portlandia | Battlestar Galactica | Battlestar Galactica | Spoiler Alert | Spoiler Alert | Downton Abbey | Downton Abbey | Downtown Abby | Downtown Abby | social game | social game | anime | anime | chaplin | chaplin | gold rush | gold rush | comics | comics | remediation | remediation | mediation | mediation | dismediation | dismediation | transmediation | transmediation | procedural | procedural

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.100 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with experiments working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition.

Subjects

mass communication | mass film | television | video games | recorded music | digital media | multimedia | media literacy | social media | media convergence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT) 21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT)

Description

The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment. The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment.

Subjects

media | media | modernity | modernity | moment | moment | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | William Wordsworth | William Wordsworth | John Keats | John Keats | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | short texts | short texts | short visual works | short visual works | short films | short films

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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