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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.416J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.416J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | medieval Europe | society | society | economy | economy | feudalism | feudalism | agriculture | agriculture | disease | disease | epidemic | epidemic | capitalism | capitalism | 21H.416 | 21H.416 | 14.70 | 14.70

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.416 Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.416 Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | medieval Europe | society | society | economy | economy | feudalism | feudalism | agriculture | agriculture | disease | disease | epidemic | epidemic | capitalism | capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies. This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

21H.134 | 21H.134 | 14.70 | 14.70 | medieval europe | medieval europe | economic history | economic history | the plague | the plague | mongols | mongols | antiquity | antiquity | vikings | vikings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Love, Sex, and Marriage (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Love, Sex, and Marriage (MIT)

Description

It is easy to think of love as a "universal language" - but do ideas about love translate easily across history, culture, and identity? In this course, we will encounter some surprising, even disturbing ideas about love and sex from medieval writers and characters: For instance, that married people can never be in love, that the most satisfying romantic love incorporates pain and violence, and that intense erotic pleasure can be found in celibate service to God. Through Arthurian romances, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, love letters, mystical visions, and more, we will explore medieval attitudes toward marriage, sexuality, and gender roles. What can these perspectives teach us about the uniqueness of the Middle Ages—and how do medieval ideas about love continue to influence t It is easy to think of love as a "universal language" - but do ideas about love translate easily across history, culture, and identity? In this course, we will encounter some surprising, even disturbing ideas about love and sex from medieval writers and characters: For instance, that married people can never be in love, that the most satisfying romantic love incorporates pain and violence, and that intense erotic pleasure can be found in celibate service to God. Through Arthurian romances, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, love letters, mystical visions, and more, we will explore medieval attitudes toward marriage, sexuality, and gender roles. What can these perspectives teach us about the uniqueness of the Middle Ages—and how do medieval ideas about love continue to influence t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | Medieval Europe | literature | literature | late antiquity | late antiquity | society | society | history | history | love | love | sex | sex | marriage | marriage | romance | romance | religion | religion | Arthur | Arthur | Chaucer | Chaucer | Canterbury Tales | Canterbury Tales | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.522 Japan in the Age of the Samurai: History and Film (MIT) 21H.522 Japan in the Age of the Samurai: History and Film (MIT)

Description

This course covers medieval Japanese society and culture from the twelfth to the nineteenth centuries, when political power rested largely in the hands of feudal warriors. Topics include religion (especially Zen Buddhism); changing concepts of "the way of the warrior;" women under feudalism; popular culture; and protest and rebellion. Presentations include weekly feature films. Assigned readings include many literary writings in translation. This course covers medieval Japanese society and culture from the twelfth to the nineteenth centuries, when political power rested largely in the hands of feudal warriors. Topics include religion (especially Zen Buddhism); changing concepts of "the way of the warrior;" women under feudalism; popular culture; and protest and rebellion. Presentations include weekly feature films. Assigned readings include many literary writings in translation.

Subjects

medieval japan | medieval japan | feudal japan | feudal japan | japanese history | japanese history | japanese film | japanese film | warring states period | warring states period | ieyasu tokugawa | ieyasu tokugawa | ukiyo-e | ukiyo-e | women in japan | women in japan | samurai | samurai | bushido | bushido | haiku | haiku | noh | noh | bunraku | bunraku | zen | zen | buddhism | buddhism | shinto | shinto | christianity in japan | christianity in japan | seppuku | seppuku | akira kurosawa | akira kurosawa | japanese superstitions | japanese superstitions | japanese religions | japanese religions | japanese society | japanese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.001 Foundations of Western Culture: Homer to Dante (MIT) 21L.001 Foundations of Western Culture: Homer to Dante (MIT)

Description

As we read broadly from throughout the vast chronological period that is "Homer to Dante," we will pepper our readings of individual ancient and medieval texts with broader questions like: what images, themes, and philosophical questions recur through the period; are there distinctly "classical" or "medieval" ways of depicting or addressing them; and what do terms like "Antiquity" or "the Middle Ages" even mean? (What are the Middle Ages in the "middle" of, for example?) Our texts will include adventure tales of travel and self-discovery (Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno); courtroom dramas of vengeance and reconciliation (Aeschylus's Oresteia and the Icelandic Njáls saga); short poems of love and transformation (Ovid's Met As we read broadly from throughout the vast chronological period that is "Homer to Dante," we will pepper our readings of individual ancient and medieval texts with broader questions like: what images, themes, and philosophical questions recur through the period; are there distinctly "classical" or "medieval" ways of depicting or addressing them; and what do terms like "Antiquity" or "the Middle Ages" even mean? (What are the Middle Ages in the "middle" of, for example?) Our texts will include adventure tales of travel and self-discovery (Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno); courtroom dramas of vengeance and reconciliation (Aeschylus's Oresteia and the Icelandic Njáls saga); short poems of love and transformation (Ovid's Met

Subjects

western | western | culture | culture | literature | literature | judeo-christian | judeo-christian | philosophy | philosophy | religion | religion | greece | greece | classic | classic | history | history | civilization | civilization | Homer | Homer | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Euripides | Euripides | Thucydides | Thucydides | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Saint Augustine | Saint Augustine | Dante | Dante | bible | bible | world | world | westernization | westernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT) 24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others. This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | architectures | syntax module of grammar | syntax module of grammar | models | models | ancient and medieval proposals | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | structuralism | early generative grammar | early generative grammar | generative semantics | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | LFG | HPSG | HPSG | TAG | TAG | functionalist perspectives | functionalist perspectives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Harvesting history, Laxton : the medieval village that survived the modern age Harvesting history, Laxton : the medieval village that survived the modern age

Description

A video covering the medieval farming and life styles preserved in Laxton, a small village in Nottinghamshire which has survived the modern age. Includes images and artefacts from the exhibition presented by the University of Nottingham Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections. Suitable for community education, secondary education, undergraduate year one and further education Author and presenter: Kathryn Summerwill. Kathryn Summerwill qualified as a professional archivist from the University of Wales, Bangor, in 1996, and has been an Assistant Archivist in The University of Nottingham’s Manuscripts and Special Collections Section since 2002. She is part of a team of staff using digital tools to extend the provision of traditional printed guides and catalogues, and has curate A video covering the medieval farming and life styles preserved in Laxton, a small village in Nottinghamshire which has survived the modern age. Includes images and artefacts from the exhibition presented by the University of Nottingham Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections. Suitable for community education, secondary education, undergraduate year one and further education Author and presenter: Kathryn Summerwill. Kathryn Summerwill qualified as a professional archivist from the University of Wales, Bangor, in 1996, and has been an Assistant Archivist in The University of Nottingham’s Manuscripts and Special Collections Section since 2002. She is part of a team of staff using digital tools to extend the provision of traditional printed guides and catalogues, and has curate

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Medieval Farming | Medieval Farming | UKOER | UKOER | Open Field Farming | Open Field Farming | Agriculture | Agriculture | Farming | Farming | Village Life | Village Life | Arable Farming | Arable Farming | Arable and Fruit Farming | Arable and Fruit Farming | Open Field Village | Open Field Village

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | ancient history | europe | culture | politics | mediterranean | germanic | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | islamic | crusades | religion | economics | feudalism | barbarian | charlemagne | england | ottonian | empire | rome | gothic | monarchy | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | social development | cultural development | political development | religious life | women | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | ancient history | europe | culture | politics | mediterranean | germanic | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | islamic | crusades | religion | economics | feudalism | barbarian | charlemagne | england | ottonian | empire | rome | gothic | monarchy | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | social development | cultural development | political development | religious life | women | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.383 Technology and the Global Economy, 1000-2000 (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines the global history of the last millennium, including technological change, commodity exchange, systems of production, and economic growth. Students engage with economic history, medieval and early modern origins of modern systems of production, consumption and global exchange. Topics include the long pre-history of modern economic development; medieval world systems; the age of discovery; the global crisis of the 17th century; demographic systems; global population movements; the industrial revolution; the rise of the modern consumer; colonialism and empire building; patterns of inequality, within and across states; the curse of natural resources fate of Africa; and the threat of climate change to modern economic systems. Students taking the graduate version complete

Subjects

technology | global economy | medieval world systems | colonialism | empire building | patterns of inequality | climate change | economic growth | Middle Ages | medieval technology | Malthus | population homeostasis | industrial revolution | industrious revolution | bourgeois virtues | British Imperialism | slavery | resource curse | Great Divergence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reading

Description

Reading from an entry in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle by Stuart D Lee, University of Oxford. Recorded March 2007. Old English Reading I: 'Cynewulf and Cyneheard' in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Read by Stuart D. Lee. Extract taken from 'The Keys of Middle-earth: discovering medieval literature through the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien' by Stuart D. Lee and Elizabeth Solopova (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2005). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | england | medieval | old english | cyneheard | #greatwriters | cynewulf | english | anglo-saxon | literature | england | medieval | old english | cyneheard | #greatwriters | cynewulf | english | anglo-saxon

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Beowulf reading, ll. 26-52

Description

Reading from Beowulf ll. 26-52 by Stuart D Lee, University of Oxford. Recorded March 2007. Old English Reading II: Beowulf, ll. 26-52. Read by Stuart D. Lee. Extract taken from 'The Keys of Middle-earth: discovering medieval literature through the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien' by Stuart D. Lee and Elizabeth Solopova (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2005). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | england | medieval | beowulf | old english | poetry | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon | literature | england | medieval | beowulf | old english | poetry | #greatwriters | english | anglo-saxon

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Harvesting history, Laxton : the medieval village that survived the modern age

Description

A video covering the medieval farming and life styles preserved in Laxton, a small village in Nottinghamshire which has survived the modern age. Includes images and artefacts from the exhibition presented by the University of Nottingham Department of Manuscripts and Special Collections. Suitable for community education, secondary education, undergraduate year one and further education Author and presenter: Kathryn Summerwill. Kathryn Summerwill qualified as a professional archivist from the University of Wales, Bangor, in 1996, and has been an Assistant Archivist in The University of Nottingham’s Manuscripts and Special Collections Section since 2002. She is part of a team of staff using digital tools to extend the provision of traditional printed guides and catalogues, and has curated a

Subjects

medieval farming | ukoer | open field farming | agriculture | farming | village life | arable farming | arable and fruit farming | open field village | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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History of Europe, 1000 to 1800

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from the medieval period to the Age of Revolutions in the eighteenth century. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this 800-year period including the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European expansion overseas, and the French Revolution. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe had transformed from a fragmented and volatile network of medieval polities into a series of independent nation-states by 1800. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 201)

Subjects

middle ages | medieval | culture | religion | renaissance | humanism | new world | reformation | martin luther | religious wars | absolutism | constitutionalism | europe | scientific | enlightenment | agricultural | atlantic economy | revolution | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21H.416J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | society | economy | feudalism | agriculture | disease | epidemic | capitalism | 21H.416 | 14.70

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.416 Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

medieval Europe | society | economy | feudalism | agriculture | disease | epidemic | capitalism

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21H.134J Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course will survey the conditions of material life and changing social and economic conditions in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. Subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the study of those factors, both institutional and technological, which have contributed to the emergence of capitalist organization and economic growth in Western Europe in contrast to the trajectories followed by the other major medieval economies.

Subjects

21H.134 | 14.70 | medieval europe | economic history | the plague | mongols | antiquity | vikings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Love, Sex, and Marriage (MIT)

Description

It is easy to think of love as a "universal language" - but do ideas about love translate easily across history, culture, and identity? In this course, we will encounter some surprising, even disturbing ideas about love and sex from medieval writers and characters: For instance, that married people can never be in love, that the most satisfying romantic love incorporates pain and violence, and that intense erotic pleasure can be found in celibate service to God. Through Arthurian romances, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, love letters, mystical visions, and more, we will explore medieval attitudes toward marriage, sexuality, and gender roles. What can these perspectives teach us about the uniqueness of the Middle Ages—and how do medieval ideas about love continue to influence t

Subjects

Medieval Europe | literature | late antiquity | society | history | love | sex | marriage | romance | religion | Arthur | Chaucer | Canterbury Tales | gender | sexuality | Middle Ages | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia: Culture and Politics (MIT)

Description

At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern. At the beginning of the eighteenth century Russia began to come into its own as a major European power. Members of the Russian intellectual classes increasingly compared themselves and their autocratic order to states and societies in the West. This comparison generated both a new sense of national consciousness and intense criticism of the existing order in Russia. In this course we will examine different perspectives on Russian history and literature in order to try to understand the Russian Empire as it changed from the medieval period to the modern.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | nobility | nobility | bourgeoisie | bourgeoisie | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Russo-Japanese War | Russo-Japanese War | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.220 Early Music (MIT) 21M.220 Early Music (MIT)

Description

This class covers the history of Western music from antiquity until approximately 1680, about 2000 years worth of music. Rather than cover each topic at the same level of depth, we will focus on four topics in particular and glue them together with a broad overview of other topics. The four topics chosen for this term are (1) chant structure, performance, and development; (2) 14th century music of Italy and France; (3) Elizabethan London; and (4) Venice in the Baroque era. The class will also introduce many of the tools we use in studying music history such as manuscript study, original notation work (the musical equivalent of foreign language study), and historical performance practice. This class covers the history of Western music from antiquity until approximately 1680, about 2000 years worth of music. Rather than cover each topic at the same level of depth, we will focus on four topics in particular and glue them together with a broad overview of other topics. The four topics chosen for this term are (1) chant structure, performance, and development; (2) 14th century music of Italy and France; (3) Elizabethan London; and (4) Venice in the Baroque era. The class will also introduce many of the tools we use in studying music history such as manuscript study, original notation work (the musical equivalent of foreign language study), and historical performance practice.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | church music | church music | chant | chant | Gregorian chant | Gregorian chant | religious music | religious music | baroque music | baroque music | mode | mode | liturgy | liturgy | monody | monody | polyphony | polyphony | Trecento | Trecento | motet | motet | Hildegard | Hildegard | Italian | Italian | French | French | Catholic | Catholic | Mass | Mass

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT) STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments. This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments.

Subjects

historical medicine | historical medicine | medieval dissection | medieval dissection | gender | gender | visible human project | visible human project | genealogies | genealogies | genome | genome | biological kinship | biological kinship | biology of race | biology of race | race and disease | race and disease | emerging diseases | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | therapeutics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | climate change | climate change | environmental technology | environmental technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Romance of the Middle Ages

Description

Dr Nicholas Perkins talks about how romance functions as a genre in the middle ages, especially about how gifts and tokens were exchanged as signs of fidelity, specifically in Sir Orfeo, Sir Gawain, and King Horn. He also incorporates the manuscripts present in the accompanying display at the Bodleian. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

romance | #greatwriters | chivalry | medieval | Arthurian | romance | #greatwriters | chivalry | medieval | Arthurian

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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