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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials. Electrical, optical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. Discussion of roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band, and microstructure), and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties. Case studies drawn from a variety of applications including semiconductor diodes, optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites, and cellular materials.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials

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8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT) 8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light–squeezed states; multi-photon processes, Raman scattering; coherence–level crossings, quantum beats, double resonance, superradiance; trapping and cooling-light forces, laser cooling, atom optics, spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions; atomic interactions–classical collisions, quantum scattering theory, ultracold collisions; and experimental methods. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light–squeezed states; multi-photon processes, Raman scattering; coherence–level crossings, quantum beats, double resonance, superradiance; trapping and cooling-light forces, laser cooling, atom optics, spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions; atomic interactions–classical collisions, quantum scattering theory, ultracold collisions; and experimental methods.

Subjects

atomic | atomic | optical physics | optical physics | squeezed states | squeezed states | single photon | single photon | Casimir force | Casimir force | optical Bloch equations | optical Bloch equations | Photon-atom interactions | Photon-atom interactions | light forces | light forces | quantum gases | quantum gases | ion traps and quantum gates | ion traps and quantum gates

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | doping | transistors | photodectors | photovoltaics | luminescence | light emitting diodes | lasers | optical phenomena | photonics | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | materials | device applications

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design | apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

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8.421 Atomic and Optical Physics I (MIT) 8.421 Atomic and Optical Physics I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the first of a two-semester subject sequence that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include the interaction of radiation with atoms: resonance; absorption, stimulated and spontaneous emission; methods of resonance, dressed atom formalism, masers and lasers, cavity quantum electrodynamics; structure of simple atoms, behavior in very strong fields; fundamental tests: time reversal, parity violations, Bell's inequalities; and experimental methods. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the first of a two-semester subject sequence that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include the interaction of radiation with atoms: resonance; absorption, stimulated and spontaneous emission; methods of resonance, dressed atom formalism, masers and lasers, cavity quantum electrodynamics; structure of simple atoms, behavior in very strong fields; fundamental tests: time reversal, parity violations, Bell's inequalities; and experimental methods.

Subjects

atom | atom | atomic and optical physics | atomic and optical physics | resonance | resonance | resonance frequency | resonance frequency | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | oscillation frequency | oscillation frequency | magnetic field | magnetic field | electric field | electric field | Landau-Zener problem | Landau-Zener problem | lamb shift | lamb shift | line broadening | line broadening | coherence | coherence

License

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided waves; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | devices and circuits | devices and circuits | static and quasistatic fields | static and quasistatic fields | electromagnetic forces | electromagnetic forces | actuators | actuators | sensors | sensors | TEM lines | TEM lines | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | antennas | antennas | radiation | radiation | optical communications | optical communications | acoustics | acoustics

License

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3.063 Polymer Physics (MIT) 3.063 Polymer Physics (MIT)

Description

This course presents the mechanical, optical, and transport properties of polymers with respect to the underlying physics and physical chemistry of polymers in melt, solution, and solid state. Topics include conformation and molecular dimensions of polymer chains in solutions, melts, blends, and block copolymers; an examination of the structure of glassy, crystalline, and rubbery elastic states of polymers; thermodynamics of polymer solutions, blends, crystallization; liquid crystallinity, microphase separation, and self-assembled organic-inorganic nanocomposites. Case studies include relationships between structure and function in technologically important polymeric systems. This course presents the mechanical, optical, and transport properties of polymers with respect to the underlying physics and physical chemistry of polymers in melt, solution, and solid state. Topics include conformation and molecular dimensions of polymer chains in solutions, melts, blends, and block copolymers; an examination of the structure of glassy, crystalline, and rubbery elastic states of polymers; thermodynamics of polymer solutions, blends, crystallization; liquid crystallinity, microphase separation, and self-assembled organic-inorganic nanocomposites. Case studies include relationships between structure and function in technologically important polymeric systems.

Subjects

mechanical | mechanical | optical | optical | transport | transport | physical chemistry | physical chemistry | chemistry | chemistry | physics | physics | melt | melt | solution | solution | solid | solid | polymer chain | polymer chain | copolymer | copolymer | glass | glass | crystal | crystal | rubber | rubber | elastic | elastic | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | microphase separation | microphase separation | organic | organic | inorganic | inorganic | nanocomposite | nanocomposite

License

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22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT) 22.56J Noninvasive Imaging in Biology and Medicine (MIT)

Description

22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems. 22.56J aims to give graduate students and advanced undergraduates background in the theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods to biology and medicine, with emphasis on neuroimaging. The course focuses on the modalities most frequently used in scientific research (X-ray CT, PET/SPECT, MRI, and optical imaging), and includes discussion of molecular imaging approaches used in conjunction with these scanning methods. Lectures by the professor will be supplemented by in-class discussions of problems in research, and hands-on demonstrations of imaging systems.

Subjects

theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | theory and application of noninvasive imaging methods | biology | biology | medicine | medicine | neuroimaging | neuroimaging | X-ray CT | X-ray CT | PET/SPECT | PET/SPECT | MRI | MRI | optical imaging | optical imaging | molecular imaging | molecular imaging | scanning methods | scanning methods | imaging systems | imaging systems | 22.56 | 22.56 | 2.761 | 2.761 | 20.483 | 20.483 | HST.561 | HST.561 | 9.713J | 9.713J | 9.713 | 9.713

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design; apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

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6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

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6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT) 6.777J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices (MIT)

Description

6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.777J / 2.372J is an introduction to microsystem design. Topics covered include: material properties, microfabrication technologies, structural behavior, sensing methods, fluid flow, microscale transport, noise, and amplifiers feedback systems. Student teams design microsystems (sensors, actuators, and sensing/control systems) of a variety of types, (e.g., optical MEMS, bioMEMS, inertial sensors) to meet a set of performance specifications (e.g., sensitivity, signal-to-noise) using a realistic microfabrication process. There is an emphasis on modeling and simulation in the design process. Prior fabrication experience is desirable. The course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microsystem design | microsystem design | material properties | material properties | microfabrication technologies | microfabrication technologies | structural behavior | structural behavior | sensing methods | sensing methods | fluid flow | fluid flow | microscale transport | microscale transport | noise | noise | amplifiers feedback systems | amplifiers feedback systems | sensors | sensors | actuators | actuators | sensing/control systems | sensing/control systems | optical MEMS | optical MEMS | bioMEMS | bioMEMS | inertial sensors | inertial sensors | sensitivity | sensitivity | signal-to-noise | signal-to-noise | realistic microfabrication process | realistic microfabrication process

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | doping | transistors | photodectors | photovoltaics | luminescence | light emitting diodes | lasers | optical phenomena | photonics | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance

License

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves. 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

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6.974 Fundamentals of Photonics: Quantum Electronics (MIT) 6.974 Fundamentals of Photonics: Quantum Electronics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the fundamentals of optical and optoelectronic phenomena and devices based on classical and quantum properties of radiation and matter culminating in lasers and applications. Fundamentals include: Maxwell's electromagnetic waves, resonators and beams, classical ray optics and optical systems, quantum theory of light, matter and its interaction, classical and quantum noise, lasers and laser dynamics, continuous wave and short pulse generation, light modulation; examples from integrated optics and semiconductor optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This course explores the fundamentals of optical and optoelectronic phenomena and devices based on classical and quantum properties of radiation and matter culminating in lasers and applications. Fundamentals include: Maxwell's electromagnetic waves, resonators and beams, classical ray optics and optical systems, quantum theory of light, matter and its interaction, classical and quantum noise, lasers and laser dynamics, continuous wave and short pulse generation, light modulation; examples from integrated optics and semiconductor optoelectronics and nonlinear optics.

Subjects

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3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.

Subjects

glass | amorphous solid | mechanical and optical properties | metastable | silica | ideal crystals | network formers | modifiers | intermediates | alkali silicate glass | amorphous semiconductors | metallic glass | glass forming theory | crystallization | thermodynamics of nucleation | potential energy landscape | ?s rules | kinetic theory | network topology theory | laboratory glass transition | glass forming ability parmaters | performance metrics | GST phase change alloy | PCM | phase change memory | data storage | pitch drop experiment | temperature dependence | viscous flow | stron v. fragile liquids | non- newtonian behavior | viscometry | linear elasticity | Newtonian viscosity | elasticity | viscosity | glass shaping | relaxation | mechanical properties | glass stregthening | electrical properties | transport properties | macroelectronics | optical properties | optical fibers | waveguides | amorphous state

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions.

Subjects

ESD.013 | ESD.013 | electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave communications | microwave communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy

License

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HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT) HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT)

Description

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Subjects

HST.410 | HST.410 | 6.07 | 6.07 | cell manipulation | cell manipulation | microchips | microchips | lithography | lithography | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | optical imaging of cells | optical imaging of cells | cell sorting | cell sorting | microfluidics | microfluidics | osmosis | osmosis | diffusion | diffusion | microfabrication | microfabrication | models of diffusion | models of diffusion | laminar flow | laminar flow | MATLAB data analysis | MATLAB data analysis | cell traps | cell traps | experimental design | experimental design | cytometry techniques | cytometry techniques | computer simulation of neural behavior | computer simulation of neural behavior | casting PDMS | casting PDMS | coulter counter | coulter counter | plasma bonding | plasma bonding

License

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave | microwave | communications | communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy | microwave communications | microwave communications

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

ray-tracing | ray-tracing | lens design | lens design | apertures and stops | apertures and stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product

License

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MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT) MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT)

Description

This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project. This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | analog electronics | analog electronics | digital electronics | digital electronics | sensing | sensing | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | optical sensor | optical sensor | inertial sensor | inertial sensor | sensor network | sensor network | electronic monitoring | electronic monitoring

License

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8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT) 8.422 Atomic and Optical Physics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light, multi-photon processes, coherence, trapping and cooling, atomic interactions, and experimental methods. This is the second of a two-semester subject sequence beginning with Atomic and Optical Physics I (8.421) that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include non-classical states of light, multi-photon processes, coherence, trapping and cooling, atomic interactions, and experimental methods.

Subjects

atomic | atomic | optical physics | optical physics | Non-classical states of light | Non-classical states of light | squeezed states | squeezed states | multi-photon processes | multi-photon processes | Raman scattering | Raman scattering | coherence | coherence | level crossings | level crossings | quantum beats | quantum beats | double resonance | double resonance | superradiance | superradiance | trapping and cooling | trapping and cooling | light forces | light forces | laser cooling | laser cooling | atom optics | atom optics | spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions | spectroscopy of trapped atoms and ions | atomic interactions | atomic interactions | classical collisions | classical collisions | quantum scattering theory | quantum scattering theory | ultracold collisions | ultracold collisions | experimental methods | experimental methods

License

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6.973 Organic Optoelectronics (MIT) 6.973 Organic Optoelectronics (MIT)

Description

The course examines optical and electronic processes in organic molecules and polymers that govern the behavior of practical organic optoelectronic devices. Electronic structure of a single organic molecule is used as a guide to the electronic behavior of organic aggregate structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of organic thin films in active organic devices including organic LEDs, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, chemical sensors, memory cells, electrochromic devices, as well as xerography and organic non-linear optics. How to reach the ultimate miniaturization limit of molecular electronics and related nanoscale patterning techniques of organic materials will also be discussed. The class encompasses three laboratory sessions during which the students will practice the use of The course examines optical and electronic processes in organic molecules and polymers that govern the behavior of practical organic optoelectronic devices. Electronic structure of a single organic molecule is used as a guide to the electronic behavior of organic aggregate structures. Emphasis is placed on the use of organic thin films in active organic devices including organic LEDs, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, chemical sensors, memory cells, electrochromic devices, as well as xerography and organic non-linear optics. How to reach the ultimate miniaturization limit of molecular electronics and related nanoscale patterning techniques of organic materials will also be discussed. The class encompasses three laboratory sessions during which the students will practice the use of

Subjects

organic optoelectronics | organic optoelectronics | optical | optical | electronic | electronic | polymers | polymers | organic thin films | organic thin films | organic LEDs | organic LEDs | solar cells | solar cells | photodetectors | photodetectors | transistors | transistors | chemical sensors | chemical sensors | memory cells | memory cells | electrochromic devices | electrochromic devices | xerography | xerography | organic non-linear optics | organic non-linear optics | miniaturization limit | miniaturization limit | molecular electronics | molecular electronics | nanoscale patterning | nanoscale patterning | vacuum organic deposition | vacuum organic deposition | non-vacuum organic deposition | non-vacuum organic deposition

License

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