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6.895 Theory of Parallel Systems (SMA 5509) (MIT) 6.895 Theory of Parallel Systems (SMA 5509) (MIT)

Description

6.895 covers theoretical foundations of general-purpose parallel computing systems, from languages to architecture. The focus is on the algorithmic underpinnings of parallel systems. The topics for the class will vary depending on student interest, but will likely include multithreading, synchronization, race detection, load balancing, memory consistency, routing networks, message-routing algorithms, and VLSI layout theory. The class will emphasize randomized algorithms and probabilistic analysis, including high-probability arguments. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5509 (Theory of Parallel Systems). 6.895 covers theoretical foundations of general-purpose parallel computing systems, from languages to architecture. The focus is on the algorithmic underpinnings of parallel systems. The topics for the class will vary depending on student interest, but will likely include multithreading, synchronization, race detection, load balancing, memory consistency, routing networks, message-routing algorithms, and VLSI layout theory. The class will emphasize randomized algorithms and probabilistic analysis, including high-probability arguments. This course was also taught as part of the Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) programme as course number SMA 5509 (Theory of Parallel Systems).

Subjects

parallel systems | parallel systems | parallel computing | parallel computing | algorithms | algorithms | multithreading | multithreading | synchronization | synchronization | race detection | race detection | load balancing | load balancing | memory consistency | memory consistency | routing networks | routing networks | message-routing algorithms | message-routing algorithms | VLSI layout theory | VLSI layout theory | randomized algorithms | randomized algorithms | probabilistic analysis | probabilistic analysis | high-probability arguments | high-probability arguments

License

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6.856J Randomized Algorithms (MIT) 6.856J Randomized Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course examines how randomization can be used to make algorithms simpler and more efficient via random sampling, random selection of witnesses, symmetry breaking, and Markov chains. Topics covered include: randomized computation; data structures (hash tables, skip lists); graph algorithms (minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, minimum cuts); geometric algorithms (convex hulls, linear programming in fixed or arbitrary dimension); approximate counting; parallel algorithms; online algorithms; derandomization techniques; and tools for probabilistic analysis of algorithms. This course examines how randomization can be used to make algorithms simpler and more efficient via random sampling, random selection of witnesses, symmetry breaking, and Markov chains. Topics covered include: randomized computation; data structures (hash tables, skip lists); graph algorithms (minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, minimum cuts); geometric algorithms (convex hulls, linear programming in fixed or arbitrary dimension); approximate counting; parallel algorithms; online algorithms; derandomization techniques; and tools for probabilistic analysis of algorithms.

Subjects

Randomized Algorithms | Randomized Algorithms | algorithms | algorithms | efficient in time and space | efficient in time and space | randomization | randomization | computational problems | computational problems | data structures | data structures | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | optimization | optimization | geometry | geometry | Markov chains | Markov chains | sampling | sampling | estimation | estimation | geometric algorithms | geometric algorithms | parallel and distributed algorithms | parallel and distributed algorithms | parallel and ditributed algorithm | parallel and ditributed algorithm | parallel and distributed algorithm | parallel and distributed algorithm | random sampling | random sampling | random selection of witnesses | random selection of witnesses | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | randomized computational models | randomized computational models | hash tables | hash tables | skip lists | skip lists | minimum spanning trees | minimum spanning trees | shortest paths | shortest paths | minimum cuts | minimum cuts | convex hulls | convex hulls | linear programming | linear programming | fixed dimension | fixed dimension | arbitrary dimension | arbitrary dimension | approximate counting | approximate counting | parallel algorithms | parallel algorithms | online algorithms | online algorithms | derandomization techniques | derandomization techniques | probabilistic analysis | probabilistic analysis | computational number theory | computational number theory | simplicity | simplicity | speed | speed | design | design | basic probability theory | basic probability theory | application | application | randomized complexity classes | randomized complexity classes | game-theoretic techniques | game-theoretic techniques | Chebyshev | Chebyshev | moment inequalities | moment inequalities | limited independence | limited independence | coupon collection | coupon collection | occupancy problems | occupancy problems | tail inequalities | tail inequalities | Chernoff bound | Chernoff bound | conditional expectation | conditional expectation | probabilistic method | probabilistic method | random walks | random walks | algebraic techniques | algebraic techniques | probability amplification | probability amplification | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | combinatorial optimization | combinatorial optimization | approximation | approximation | counting problems | counting problems | distributed algorithms | distributed algorithms | 6.856 | 6.856 | 18.416 | 18.416

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7.342 To Divide or Not To Divide: Control of Cell Cycle and Growth by Extracellular Cues (MIT) 7.342 To Divide or Not To Divide: Control of Cell Cycle and Growth by Extracellular Cues (MIT)

Description

Cells, regardless of whether they are in an organ in the human body or a component of a bacterial colony, can sense the chemical composition of the environment, the presence of neighboring cells, and even the types of their neighboring cells. Depending on the identity of a cell and the information it receives from its environment, it can grow (increase in size), proliferate (make more cells), become quiescent (stop growing and dividing), differentiate (make different types of cells), or die. How cells achieve the astonishing feat of appropriately sensing and responding to their environment has been a major question in biology. In this course we will read and critically discuss the primary scientific literature with the goal of highlighting the basic principles of cell growth, adaptation, a Cells, regardless of whether they are in an organ in the human body or a component of a bacterial colony, can sense the chemical composition of the environment, the presence of neighboring cells, and even the types of their neighboring cells. Depending on the identity of a cell and the information it receives from its environment, it can grow (increase in size), proliferate (make more cells), become quiescent (stop growing and dividing), differentiate (make different types of cells), or die. How cells achieve the astonishing feat of appropriately sensing and responding to their environment has been a major question in biology. In this course we will read and critically discuss the primary scientific literature with the goal of highlighting the basic principles of cell growth, adaptation, a

Subjects

Cell growth | Cell growth | cell cycle | cell cycle | bacteria | bacteria | cell signaling | cell signaling | yeast | yeast | Genetic regulation | Genetic regulation | signaling pathways | signaling pathways | RAS | RAS | TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) | TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) | sporulation | sporulation | IME1 | IME1 | biofilms | biofilms

License

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7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT) 7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT)

Description

Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad

Subjects

Aging | Aging | age-related diseases | age-related diseases | molecular biology of aging | molecular biology of aging | calorie restriction | calorie restriction | resveratrol | resveratrol | rapamycin | rapamycin | Caloric restriction (CR) | Caloric restriction (CR) | Cellular senescence | Cellular senescence | telomerase | telomerase | progeroid syndromes | progeroid syndromes | mitochondrial DNA | mitochondrial DNA | yeast | yeast | C. elegans | C. elegans | Drosophila | Drosophila | Sirtuins | Sirtuins | SIR4 | SIR4 | target of rapamycin (TOR) | target of rapamycin (TOR) | oxidative damage | oxidative damage | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease

License

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7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT) 7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Engineering | Microbial Systems | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | Biofuel Production | energy | energy | plant biomass | plant biomass | cellulose | cellulose | enzymes | enzymes | bacteria | bacteria | ethanol | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulases | cellulosomes | cellulosomes | E. coli | E. coli | yeast | yeast

License

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7.342 The X in Sex: A Genetic, Medical, and Evolutionary View of the X Chromosome (MIT) 7.342 The X in Sex: A Genetic, Medical, and Evolutionary View of the X Chromosome (MIT)

Description

This course will explore a diverse collection of striking biological phenomena associated with the X chromosome. We will examine the genetic basis and significance of several X-linked mutations. We will also discuss why men are more likely than women to display X-linked traits. We will look at the different mechanisms by which X chromosome gene expression is equalized in mammals, flies, and worms and how these mechanisms can yield unusual phenotypes. Throughout our discussions of the X chromosome we will use both recent and classic primary research papers to learn about this chromosome's fascinating biology. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary researc This course will explore a diverse collection of striking biological phenomena associated with the X chromosome. We will examine the genetic basis and significance of several X-linked mutations. We will also discuss why men are more likely than women to display X-linked traits. We will look at the different mechanisms by which X chromosome gene expression is equalized in mammals, flies, and worms and how these mechanisms can yield unusual phenotypes. Throughout our discussions of the X chromosome we will use both recent and classic primary research papers to learn about this chromosome's fascinating biology. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary researc

Subjects

X chromosome | X chromosome | genetics | genetics | flies | flies | mammals | mammals | worms | worms | sex reversal | sex reversal | dosage compensation | dosage compensation | X-inactivation | X-inactivation | hybrid | hybrid | Haldane's rule | Haldane's rule | drosophila | drosophila | gene | gene | dna | dna | dosage | dosage | pedigree | pedigree | genetic map | genetic map | Thomas Hunt Morgan | Thomas Hunt Morgan | Calvin Bridges | Calvin Bridges | Alfred Sturtevant | Alfred Sturtevant | evolution | evolution

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

In this class, students engage in independent research projects to probe various aspects of the physiology of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, an opportunistic pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Students use molecular genetics to examine survival in stationary phase, antibiotic resistance, phase variation, toxin production, and secondary metabolite production. Projects aim to discover the molecular basis for these processes using both classical and cutting-edge techniques. These include plasmid manipulation, genetic complementation, mutagenesis, PCR, DNA sequencing, enzyme assays, and gene expression studies. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are also emphasized. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials In this class, students engage in independent research projects to probe various aspects of the physiology of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, an opportunistic pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Students use molecular genetics to examine survival in stationary phase, antibiotic resistance, phase variation, toxin production, and secondary metabolite production. Projects aim to discover the molecular basis for these processes using both classical and cutting-edge techniques. These include plasmid manipulation, genetic complementation, mutagenesis, PCR, DNA sequencing, enzyme assays, and gene expression studies. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are also emphasized. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | pseudomonas | pseudomonas | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | pathogen | pathogen | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | protocol | protocol | vector | vector | mutant | mutant | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis

License

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7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT) 7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

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7.03 Genetics (MIT) 7.03 Genetics (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease. This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Subjects

genetics | genetics | gene | gene | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | mutation | mutation | genome | genome | Watson and Crick | Watson and Crick | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | DNA heliz | DNA heliz | double helix | double helix | mRNA | mRNA | messenger RNA | messenger RNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | promoter | promoter | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | alleles | alleles | genotype | genotype | wild type | wild type | phenotype | phenotype | haploid | haploid | diploid | diploid | auxotrophic mutation | auxotrophic mutation | homozygous | homozygous | heterozygous | heterozygous | recessive allele | recessive allele | dominant allele | dominant allele | complementation test | complementation test | locus | locus | incomplete dominance | incomplete dominance | incomplete penetrance | incomplete penetrance | true-breeding | true-breeding | gametes | gametes | codominant | codominant | meiosis | meiosis

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs. Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | Junior Lab | experimental | experimental | atomic | atomic | nuclear | nuclear | physics | physics | optics | optics | photoelectric effect | photoelectric effect | poisson | poisson | statistics | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | emission spectra | neutron physics | neutron physics | Johnson noise | Johnson noise | shot noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | Zeeman effect | rubidium | rubidium | M?ssbauer | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | superconductivity | Doppler-free | Doppler-free | laser | laser

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8.01L Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT) 8.01L Physics I: Classical Mechanics (MIT)

Description

8.01L is an introductory mechanics course, which covers all the topics covered in 8.01T. The class meets throughout the fall, and continues throughout the Independent Activities Period (IAP). 8.01L is an introductory mechanics course, which covers all the topics covered in 8.01T. The class meets throughout the fall, and continues throughout the Independent Activities Period (IAP).

Subjects

Introductory classical mechanics | Introductory classical mechanics | space | space | time | time | straight-line kinematics | straight-line kinematics | motion in a plane | motion in a plane | forces | forces | static equilibrium | static equilibrium | particle dynamics | particle dynamics | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | relative inertial frames | relative inertial frames | non-inertial force | non-inertial force | work | work | potential energy | potential energy | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | ideal gas | ideal gas | rigid bodies | rigid bodies | rotational dynamics | rotational dynamics | vibrational motion | vibrational motion | conservation of angular momentum | conservation of angular momentum | central force motions | central force motions | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | Technology-Enabled Active Learning | Technology-Enabled Active Learning

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8.07 Electromagnetism II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second in a series on Electromagnetism beginning with Electromagnetism I (8.02 or 8.022). It is a survey of basic electromagnetic phenomena: electrostatics; magnetostatics; electromagnetic properties of matter; time-dependent electromagnetic fields; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves; emission, absorption, and scattering of radiation; and relativistic electrodynamics and mechanics.

Subjects

electromagnetic phenomena | electrostatics | magnetostatics | electromagnetic properties of matter | Time-dependent electromagnetic fields | Maxwell's equations | Electromagnetic waves | emission | absorption | scattering of radiation | Relativistic electrodynamics | mechanics

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Visual Cognition (MIT)

Description

9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. 9.63 teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. The course combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises and requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming is desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments. A fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | human perception | human perception | cognition | cognition | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | signal detection theory | signal detection theory | single factor design | single factor design | factorial design | factorial design | matlab | matlab | correlational studies | correlational studies | ethics in research | ethics in research | visual cognition | visual cognition | thought | thought | psychology and cognitive science | psychology and cognitive science | information processing | information processing | organization of visual cognitive abilities. | organization of visual cognitive abilities.

License

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9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help We are now at an unprecedented point in the field of neuroscience: We can watch the human brain in action as it sees, thinks, decides, reads, and remembers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the only method that enables us to monitor local neural activity in the normal human brain in a noninvasive fashion and with good spatial resolution. A large number of far-reaching and fundamental questions about the human mind and brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of this technology. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information including object recognition, mental imagery, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, and visual memory. The goals of this course are to help

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory | voxelwise analysis | voxelwise analysis | conjugate mirroring | conjugate mirroring | interleaved stimulus presentation | interleaved stimulus presentation | magnetization following excitation | magnetization following excitation | active voxels | active voxels | scanner drift | scanner drift | trial sorting | trial sorting | collinear factors | collinear factors | different model factors | different model factors | mock scanner | mock scanner | scanner session | scanner session | visual stimulation task | visual stimulation task | hemoglobin signal | hemoglobin signal | labeling plane | labeling plane | nearby voxels | nearby voxels | shimming coils | shimming coils | bias field estimation | bias field estimation | conscious encoding | conscious encoding | spiral imaging | spiral imaging | functional resolution | functional resolution | hemodynamic activity | hemodynamic activity | direct cortical stimulation | direct cortical stimulation | physiological noise | physiological noise | refractory effects | refractory effects | independent statistical tests. | independent statistical tests.

License

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9.22J A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain (MIT) 9.22J A Clinical Approach to the Human Brain (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease, and is intended for both the Brain and Cognitive Sciences major and the non-Brain and Cognitive Sciences major. Knowledge of how the human brain works is important for all citizens, and the lessons to be learned have enormous implications for public policy makers and educators. The course will cover the regional anatomy of the brain and provide an introduction to the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. Commonly used drugs that alter brain function can be understood through a knowledge of neurotransmitters. Along similar lines, common diseases that illustrate normal brain function will be discussed. Experimental animal studies that reveal how the brain works wil This course is designed to provide an understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease, and is intended for both the Brain and Cognitive Sciences major and the non-Brain and Cognitive Sciences major. Knowledge of how the human brain works is important for all citizens, and the lessons to be learned have enormous implications for public policy makers and educators. The course will cover the regional anatomy of the brain and provide an introduction to the cellular function of neurons, synapses and neurotransmitters. Commonly used drugs that alter brain function can be understood through a knowledge of neurotransmitters. Along similar lines, common diseases that illustrate normal brain function will be discussed. Experimental animal studies that reveal how the brain works wil

Subjects

9.22 | 9.22 | HST.422 | HST.422 | brain | brain | fMRI | fMRI | visual | visual | spatial | spatial | dyslexia | dyslexia | development | development | motor activities | motor activities | anatomy | anatomy | cellular function | cellular function | neurons | neurons | synapes | synapes | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | diseases | diseases | animal studies | animal studies | clinical cases | clinical cases | activity-dependent development | activity-dependent development | critical periods | critical periods | plasticity | plasticity | learning | learning | emotional disorders | emotional disorders | vision | vision | language | language | motor function | motor function | pain | pain | placebo effects | placebo effects | emotional states | emotional states | education | education | dementia | dementia

License

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9.93 Cognitive Neuroscience of Remembering: Creating and Controlling Memory (MIT) 9.93 Cognitive Neuroscience of Remembering: Creating and Controlling Memory (MIT)

Description

This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This survey course is intended to review memory and its impact on our lives. Memories make us who we are, and make us what we are going to become. The loss of memory in amnesia can cause us to lose ourselves. Memory provides a bridge between past and present. Through memory, past sensations, feelings, and ideas that have dropped from conscious awareness can be subsequently recovered to guide current thought and action. In this manner, memory allows us to locate our car in the parking lot at the end of the day or guides us to avoid retelling the same joke to the same friend. This seminar will focus on how memories a This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This survey course is intended to review memory and its impact on our lives. Memories make us who we are, and make us what we are going to become. The loss of memory in amnesia can cause us to lose ourselves. Memory provides a bridge between past and present. Through memory, past sensations, feelings, and ideas that have dropped from conscious awareness can be subsequently recovered to guide current thought and action. In this manner, memory allows us to locate our car in the parking lot at the end of the day or guides us to avoid retelling the same joke to the same friend. This seminar will focus on how memories a

Subjects

human memory | human memory | neural memory | neural memory | cognitive control | cognitive control | recall | recall | retrieval | retrieval | learning | learning | perception | perception | priming | priming | forgetting | forgetting | frontal lobe | frontal lobe | MRI | MRI | brain imaging | brain imaging | amnesia | amnesia | Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's | dementia | dementia | aging | aging | short-term memory | short-term memory | long-term memory | long-term memory | memory loss | memory loss | eyewitness | eyewitness | false memory | false memory | visualization | visualization

License

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9.52-A Investigating the Neural Substrates of Remote Memory using fMRI (MIT) 9.52-A Investigating the Neural Substrates of Remote Memory using fMRI (MIT)

Description

This course is an investigation to distinguish episodic memory, which is memory of personal events, from semantic memory, which is general knowledge independent of time and place. This course is an investigation to distinguish episodic memory, which is memory of personal events, from semantic memory, which is general knowledge independent of time and place.

Subjects

semantic memory | semantic memory | episodic memory | episodic memory

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

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10.491 Integrated Chemical Engineering II (MIT) 10.491 Integrated Chemical Engineering II (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to methods and background needed for the conceptual design of continuously operating chemical plants. Particular attention is paid to the use of process modeling tools such as Aspen that are used in industry and to problems of current interest. Each student team is assigned to evaluate and design a different technology and prepare a final design report. For spring 2006, the theme of the course is to design technologies for lowering the emissions of climatically active gases from processes that use coal as the primary fuel. This course introduces students to methods and background needed for the conceptual design of continuously operating chemical plants. Particular attention is paid to the use of process modeling tools such as Aspen that are used in industry and to problems of current interest. Each student team is assigned to evaluate and design a different technology and prepare a final design report. For spring 2006, the theme of the course is to design technologies for lowering the emissions of climatically active gases from processes that use coal as the primary fuel.

Subjects

integrated chemical engineering | integrated chemical engineering | ICE | ICE | process design | process design | differential equations | differential equations | separation processes | separation processes | simulation | simulation | flowsheet | flowsheet | reactor design | reactor design | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | economic feasibility study | economic feasibility study | economic analysis | economic analysis

License

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10.40 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (MIT) 10.40 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course aims to connect the principles, concepts, and laws/postulates of classical and statistical thermodynamics to applications that require quantitative knowledge of thermodynamic properties from a macroscopic to a molecular level. It covers their basic postulates of classical thermodynamics and their application to transient open and closed systems, criteria of stability and equilibria, as well as constitutive property models of pure materials and mixtures emphasizing molecular-level effects using the formalism of statistical mechanics. Phase and chemical equilibria of multicomponent systems are covered. Applications are emphasized through extensive problem work relating to practical cases. This course aims to connect the principles, concepts, and laws/postulates of classical and statistical thermodynamics to applications that require quantitative knowledge of thermodynamic properties from a macroscopic to a molecular level. It covers their basic postulates of classical thermodynamics and their application to transient open and closed systems, criteria of stability and equilibria, as well as constitutive property models of pure materials and mixtures emphasizing molecular-level effects using the formalism of statistical mechanics. Phase and chemical equilibria of multicomponent systems are covered. Applications are emphasized through extensive problem work relating to practical cases.

Subjects

thermodynamics | thermodynamics | first law | first law | second law | second law | entropy | entropy | Carnot | Carnot | Gibbs | Gibbs | energy | energy | free energy | free energy | equilibrium | equilibrium | ideal gas | ideal gas | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | ensemble | ensemble | Hamiltonian | Hamiltonian | fugacity | fugacity | fluids | fluids | phase | phase | stability | stability

License

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11.014J American Urban History II (MIT) 11.014J American Urban History II (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper. This is a seminar course that explores the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks. The course gives students experience in working with primary documentation sources through its selection of readings and class discussions. Students then have the opportunity to apply this experience by researching their own historical questions and writing a term paper.

Subjects

11.014 | 11.014 | 21H.232 | 21H.232 | urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | "white flight" | "white flight" | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts | zoos | zoos | entertainment | entertainment

License

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11.902 Advanced Urban Public Finance: Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods (MIT) 11.902 Advanced Urban Public Finance: Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods (MIT)

Description

In analyzing fiscal issues, conventional public finance approaches focus mainly on taxation and public spending. Policymakers and practitioners rarely explore solutions by examining the fundamental problem: the failure of interested parties to act collectively to internalize the positive externalities generated by public goods. Public finance is merely one of many possible institutional arrangements for assigning the rights and responsibilities to public goods consumption. This system is currently under stress because of the financial crisis. The first part of the class will focus on collective action and its connection with local public finance. The second part will explore alternative institutional arrangements for mediating collective action problems associated with the provision of loc In analyzing fiscal issues, conventional public finance approaches focus mainly on taxation and public spending. Policymakers and practitioners rarely explore solutions by examining the fundamental problem: the failure of interested parties to act collectively to internalize the positive externalities generated by public goods. Public finance is merely one of many possible institutional arrangements for assigning the rights and responsibilities to public goods consumption. This system is currently under stress because of the financial crisis. The first part of the class will focus on collective action and its connection with local public finance. The second part will explore alternative institutional arrangements for mediating collective action problems associated with the provision of loc

Subjects

Advanced | Advanced | Urban | Urban | Public Finance | Public Finance | Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods | Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods | Machine | Machine | Technology | Technology | Globalization | Globalization | Cities | Cities | Culturing Life | Culturing Life | Economic Reform | Economic Reform | Public Policy | Public Policy | Education | Education | Social Movement | Social Movement | Current Crises | Current Crises | Nation | Nation | Economy | Economy | Social Science Analysis | Social Science Analysis | Social Reform | Social Reform | Economic Data | Economic Data | Suburban | Suburban | Neighborhood Composition | Neighborhood Composition | Infrastructure Development | Infrastructure Development | Changing Federal Policies | Changing Federal Policies | Wealth Transfer | Wealth Transfer | Social Groups | Social Groups | Data | Data

License

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