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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

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21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT) 21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity. This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | wars of independence | wars of independence | global economy | global economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | Mexico | Mexico | Cuba | Cuba | Central America | Central America

License

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21H.234J Downtown (MIT) 21H.234J Downtown (MIT)

Description

This seminar focuses on downtowns in U.S. cities from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on downtown as an idea, place, and cluster of interests; on the changing character of downtown; and on recent efforts to rebuild it. Subjects to be considered will include subways, skyscrapers, highways, urban renewal, and retail centers. The focus will be on readings, discussions, and individual research projects. This seminar focuses on downtowns in U.S. cities from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on downtown as an idea, place, and cluster of interests; on the changing character of downtown; and on recent efforts to rebuild it. Subjects to be considered will include subways, skyscrapers, highways, urban renewal, and retail centers. The focus will be on readings, discussions, and individual research projects.

Subjects

21H.234 | 21H.234 | 11.339 | 11.339 | 11.026 | 11.026 | urban planning | urban planning | urban design | urban design | cities | cities | downtown | downtown | skyscrapers | skyscrapers | buildings | buildings | open space | open space | infrastructure | infrastructure | traffic | traffic | congestion | congestion | "white flight" | "white flight" | suburban development | suburban development | urban renewal | urban renewal | urban blight | urban blight | retail and business centers and districts | retail and business centers and districts

License

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison. This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | poetry | poetry | America | America | American | American | independence | independence | Melville | Melville | Twain | Twain | Morrison | Morrison | realism | realism | satire | satire | history | history | biography | biography | Emerson | Emerson | Hawthorne | Hawthorne | Thoreau | Thoreau | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Wharton | Wharton | Hurston | Hurston | Rowlandson | Rowlandson | Douglass | Douglass

License

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

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21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT) 21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in connection with two interrelated ideas. (1) When serious fiction deals with matters of great consequence, it should not deal with the actions of persons of consequence—kings, princes, high elected officials and the like—but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires. To use a phrase of Balzac's, serious fiction deals with "what happens everywhere". (2) This idea sometimes goes with another: that the most significant representations of the human condition are those dealing with persons who try to compel society to accept them as its destined agent, despite their absence of high birth or inheritance. This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in connection with two interrelated ideas. (1) When serious fiction deals with matters of great consequence, it should not deal with the actions of persons of consequence—kings, princes, high elected officials and the like—but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires. To use a phrase of Balzac's, serious fiction deals with "what happens everywhere". (2) This idea sometimes goes with another: that the most significant representations of the human condition are those dealing with persons who try to compel society to accept them as its destined agent, despite their absence of high birth or inheritance.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | European literature | European literature | novel | novel | history | history | fiction | fiction | cervantes | cervantes | balzac | balzac | stendahl | stendahl | flaubert | flaubert | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | tolstoy | tolstoy | realistic tradition | realistic tradition | romantic | romantic | naturalism | naturalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.315 Prizewinners (MIT) 21L.315 Prizewinners (MIT)

Description

This 6-unit subject gives students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the poetry of two living Nobel Laureates: the Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, and the Northern-Irish poet, Seamus Heaney. We will begin and end the semester with their magnificent epic works: Heaney's translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, and Walcott's Omeros (a modern epic set in the West Indies). Between these major narrative poems, we will read a rich selection of their shorter poems, as well as some of their reflections in prose on what poetry does, on what other poets do, and what it means to write in English from the historical and political situation of Northern Ireland (for Heaney) or the Caribbean (for Walcott). This 6-unit subject gives students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the poetry of two living Nobel Laureates: the Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, and the Northern-Irish poet, Seamus Heaney. We will begin and end the semester with their magnificent epic works: Heaney's translation of the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, and Walcott's Omeros (a modern epic set in the West Indies). Between these major narrative poems, we will read a rich selection of their shorter poems, as well as some of their reflections in prose on what poetry does, on what other poets do, and what it means to write in English from the historical and political situation of Northern Ireland (for Heaney) or the Caribbean (for Walcott).

Subjects

Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Derek Walcott | Derek Walcott | Beowulf | Beowulf | Omeros | Omeros | poetry | poetry | epic | epic | translation | translation | Northern Ireland | Northern Ireland | Caribbean | Caribbean | Nobel Prize literature | Nobel Prize literature | Opened Ground | Opened Ground | Collected Poems | Collected Poems | former British colonies | former British colonies

License

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response. Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | novel | short story | short story | the city in literature | the city in literature | structure | structure | narrative voice | narrative voice | character development | character development | novelistic experimentation | novelistic experimentation | historical context | historical context | political context | political context | reader response | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT) 21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald. This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | Media | film | literature | literature | genre | genre | topic | topic | style | style | cinema | cinema | literary narrative | literary narrative | cultural | cultural | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | boundaries | boundaries | theory of narrative | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Oscar Wilde and the '90's (MIT)

Description

At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho At this distance Oscar Wilde seems not only to be on the threshold between centuries and between cultural-systems: in many ways he seems to be the threshold. His aesthetics look backwards to the aestheticism of Pater and the moral sensibility of Ruskin, and they look forward to Modernism. His antecedents are 18th century playwrights, and he opened a path of irony and structural self-reflexivity that leads to Beckett and Tom Stoppard. He was Irish but achieved his great successes in England. Arguably, his greatest success was his greatest public failure: in his scandalous trials he shaped 20th century attitudes toward homosexuality and toward theatricality and toward performativity. His greatest performance was the role of "Oscar Wilde": in that sense he taught the 20th century ho

Subjects

Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Authors | Authors | Literature | Literature | Shaw | Shaw | Isben | Isben

License

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Virginia Woolf's Shakespeare (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Virginia Woolf's Shakespeare (MIT)

Description

How does one writer use another writer's work? Does it matter if one author has been dead 300 years? What difference does it make if she's a groundbreaking twentieth-century feminist and the writer she values has come to epitomize the English literary tradition? How can a novelist borrow from plays and poems? By reading Virginia Woolf's major novels and essays in juxtaposition with some of the Shakespeare plays that (depending on one's interpretation) haunt, enrich, and/or shape her writing, we will try to answer these questions and raise others. Readings in literary criticism, women's studies, and other literary texts will complement our focus on the relationship--across time, media, and gender--between Shakespeare and Woolf. As a seminar, we will work to become more astute How does one writer use another writer's work? Does it matter if one author has been dead 300 years? What difference does it make if she's a groundbreaking twentieth-century feminist and the writer she values has come to epitomize the English literary tradition? How can a novelist borrow from plays and poems? By reading Virginia Woolf's major novels and essays in juxtaposition with some of the Shakespeare plays that (depending on one's interpretation) haunt, enrich, and/or shape her writing, we will try to answer these questions and raise others. Readings in literary criticism, women's studies, and other literary texts will complement our focus on the relationship--across time, media, and gender--between Shakespeare and Woolf. As a seminar, we will work to become more astute

Subjects

WGS.510 | WGS.510 | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | SP.430 | SP.430 | WMN.430 | WMN.430

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21M.873 Theater Arts Topics - Suburbia (MIT) 21M.873 Theater Arts Topics - Suburbia (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. Directed practice in acting, production, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Consult Theater Arts Office. Includes directed practice in stagecraft. Dramashop rehearses a production of Eric Bogosian's play "subUrbia" for presentation the first two weekends in February. Visiting artist, David R. Gammons, directs. Approximately 10 roles filled by auditions. Students can receive up to six credits for acting or technical positions. Schedule of rehearsals to be arranged, but actors should be available during the afternoon. Students must be available for performances in early February. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. Directed practice in acting, production, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Consult Theater Arts Office. Includes directed practice in stagecraft. Dramashop rehearses a production of Eric Bogosian's play "subUrbia" for presentation the first two weekends in February. Visiting artist, David R. Gammons, directs. Approximately 10 roles filled by auditions. Students can receive up to six credits for acting or technical positions. Schedule of rehearsals to be arranged, but actors should be available during the afternoon. Students must be available for performances in early February. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period

Subjects

Acting | Acting | directing | directing | design | design | theater | theater | one-act | one-act | full length | full length | pre-rehearsal | pre-rehearsal | workshop | workshop | production | production | theater arts | theater arts | directed practice | directed practice | stagecraft | stagecraft | Dramashop | Dramashop | rehearsal | rehearsal | subUrbia | subUrbia | David Gammons | David Gammons | Eric Bogosian | Eric Bogosian | play | play | auditions | auditions | technical | technical | audio | audio | video | video | images | images

License

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21M.734 Design for the Theater: Scenery (MIT) 21M.734 Design for the Theater: Scenery (MIT)

Description

This course will examine theory of scenic design as currently practiced, as well as historical traditions for use of performance space and audience/performer engagement. Four play scripts and one opera or dance theater piece will be designed after in-depth analysis; emphasis will be on the social, political and cultural milieu at the time of their creation, and now. This course will examine theory of scenic design as currently practiced, as well as historical traditions for use of performance space and audience/performer engagement. Four play scripts and one opera or dance theater piece will be designed after in-depth analysis; emphasis will be on the social, political and cultural milieu at the time of their creation, and now.

Subjects

Design | Design | Theater | Theater | Scenery | Scenery | Stagecraft | Stagecraft | Culture | Culture | Play | Play | Script | Script | Set | Set | Prop | Prop | Costume | Costume | Act | Act | scenic design | scenic design | performance space | performance space | audience | audience | performers | performers | plays | plays | operas | operas | one acts | one acts | open studio | open studio | concept statements | concept statements | script analysis | script analysis | models | models | renderings | renderings | props | props | costumes | costumes | sets | sets

License

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21M.734 Lighting Design for the Theatre (MIT) 21M.734 Lighting Design for the Theatre (MIT)

Description

This class explores the artistry of Lighting Design. Students gain an overall technical working knowledge of the tools of the trade, and learn how, and where to apply them to a final design. However essential technical expertise is, the class stresses the artistic, conceptual, collaborative side of the craft. The class format is a "hands on" approach, with a good portion of class time spent in a theatre. This class explores the artistry of Lighting Design. Students gain an overall technical working knowledge of the tools of the trade, and learn how, and where to apply them to a final design. However essential technical expertise is, the class stresses the artistic, conceptual, collaborative side of the craft. The class format is a "hands on" approach, with a good portion of class time spent in a theatre.

Subjects

Lighting | Lighting | Design | Design | Theatre | Theatre | Stagecraft | Stagecraft | Technical | Technical | Stage | Stage | Production | Production | Theater | Theater | theatrical lighting design | theatrical lighting design | Boston theater | Boston theater | theater architecture | theater architecture | written script analysis | written script analysis | plot | plot | paperwork | paperwork | theoretical design | theoretical design | spatial adaptation | spatial adaptation | artistry | artistry | storyboards | storyboards

License

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | core design criteria | core design criteria | in-core aspects | in-core aspects | nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | operations | operations | economics | economics | fast reactors | fast reactors | CANDU physics | CANDU physics | fuel cycle | fuel cycle | coupled reactor analysis | coupled reactor analysis | fuel manufacturing and design | fuel manufacturing and design | thorium fuel cycles | thorium fuel cycles

License

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22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT) 22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT)

Description

This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

reactor | reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | radiation | radiation | feedback | feedback | light-water reactor | light-water reactor | neutron | neutron | reactor operation | reactor operation | reactor startup | reactor startup | reactor shutdown | reactor shutdown | reactor emergency | reactor emergency | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | PWR | PWR | BWR | BWR | criticality | criticality | reactor design | reactor design

License

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24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT) 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is the third and final part of our graduate introduction to semantics. The other two classes are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.973 Advanced Semantics. The semester will be divided into somewhat independent units. One unit will be devoted to conversational implicatures (mainly scalar implicatures) and another to presupposition. In each unit, we will discuss basic concepts and technical tools and then devote some time to recent work which illustrates their application. This course is the third and final part of our graduate introduction to semantics. The other two classes are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.973 Advanced Semantics. The semester will be divided into somewhat independent units. One unit will be devoted to conversational implicatures (mainly scalar implicatures) and another to presupposition. In each unit, we will discuss basic concepts and technical tools and then devote some time to recent work which illustrates their application.

Subjects

implicatures | implicatures | presuppositions | presuppositions | free choice disjunction | free choice disjunction | embedded implicatures | embedded implicatures

License

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24.260 Topics in Philosophy: David Lewis (MIT) 24.260 Topics in Philosophy: David Lewis (MIT)

Description

The class will be devoted to the work of David Lewis, one of the most exciting and influential philosophers of the late twentieth century. We will have seminar-style discussions about his work on counterfactuals, time, causation, probability, and decision-theory. The class will be devoted to the work of David Lewis, one of the most exciting and influential philosophers of the late twentieth century. We will have seminar-style discussions about his work on counterfactuals, time, causation, probability, and decision-theory.

Subjects

counterfactuals | counterfactuals | comparative possibility | comparative possibility | counterfactual dependence | counterfactual dependence | time | time | causation | causation | causal explanation | causal explanation | probability | probability | subjectivity | subjectivity | objectivity | objectivity | chance | chance | Hume | Hume | supervenience | supervenience | decision theory | decision theory | Prisoners? Dilemma | Prisoners? Dilemma | Newcomb problem | Newcomb problem | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | plurality of worlds | plurality of worlds | possible worlds | possible worlds | time travel | time travel

License

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24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT) 24.02 Moral Problems and the Good Life (MIT)

Description

This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern. This course will focus on issues that arise in contemporary public debate concerning matters of social justice. Topics will likely include: euthanasia, gay marriage, racism and racial profiling, free speech, hunger and global inequality. Students will be exposed to multiple points of view on the topics and will be given guidance in analyzing the moral frameworks informing opposing positions. The goal will be to provide the basis for respectful and informed discussion of matters of common moral concern.

Subjects

pleasure | pleasure | desire | desire | satisfaction | satisfaction | objectivity | objectivity | environmentalism | environmentalism | animal rights | animal rights | immortality | immortality | egoism | egoism | skepticism | skepticism | relativism | relativism | toleration | toleration | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deontology | deontology | virtue | virtue | moral theory | moral theory | global justice | global justice | equality | equality | social justice | social justice | race | race | gender | gender | poverty | poverty | sex | sex | welfare | welfare | freedom | freedom | death penalty | death penalty | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexuality | sexuality | pornography | pornography | free speech | free speech | hate speech | hate speech

License

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24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Self-Knowledge (MIT) 24.500 Topics in Philosophy of Mind: Self-Knowledge (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar on "self-knowledge" -- knowledge of one's own mental states. In addition to reading some of the classic papers on self-knowledge, we will look at some very recent work on the topic. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion. This is a seminar on "self-knowledge" -- knowledge of one's own mental states. In addition to reading some of the classic papers on self-knowledge, we will look at some very recent work on the topic. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | transparency | transparency | mind | mind | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | mental states | mental states | externalist | externalist | individualism | individualism | warrant transmission | warrant transmission | misidentification | misidentification | self-identification | self-identification | expressivism | expressivism | neo-expressivism | neo-expressivism

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT)

Description

I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big

Subjects

linguistic theory | linguistic theory | semantics | semantics | typology | typology | preformatics | preformatics | modality | modality | evidentiality | evidentiality | embedded assertions | embedded assertions | modes of assertion | modes of assertion | modulation | modulation | force | force | formal semantics | formal semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | speech acts | speech acts | performative utterances | performative utterances | language constructions | language constructions | English | English | German | German | Quechua | Quechua | Tibetan | Tibetan | evidentiality marking | evidentiality marking | epistemic modality | epistemic modality | performatives | performatives | evidentials | evidentials | direct evidentiality | direct evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | conditionals | conditionals | Faller?s ideas | Faller?s ideas | best possible grounds | best possible grounds

License

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24.500 Other Minds (MIT) 24.500 Other Minds (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar on issues connected with the traditional "problem of other minds". In addition to reading some of the classic papers on other minds, we will look at recent work on related topics. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion. This is a seminar on issues connected with the traditional "problem of other minds". In addition to reading some of the classic papers on other minds, we will look at recent work on related topics. There will be no lectures. Each week I will spend half an hour or so introducing the assigned reading, and the rest of the time will be devoted to discussion.

Subjects

consciousness | consciousness | mental representation | mental representation | perception | perception | mental causation | mental causation

License

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ESD.83 Doctoral Seminar in Engineering Systems (MIT) ESD.83 Doctoral Seminar in Engineering Systems (MIT)

Description

ESD.83 Doctoral Seminar in Engineering Systems examines the core theory and contextual applications of the emerging field of Engineering Systems. There is a focus on doctoral–level analysis of scholarship on key concepts such as complexity, uncertainty, fragility, and robustness, as well as a critical look at the historical roots of the field and related areas such as systems engineering, systems dynamics, agent modeling, and systems simulations. Contextual applications of the course range from aerospace to technology implementation to regulatory systems to large–scale systems change. Special attention is given to the interdependence of social and technical dimensions of engineering systems. ESD.83 Doctoral Seminar in Engineering Systems examines the core theory and contextual applications of the emerging field of Engineering Systems. There is a focus on doctoral–level analysis of scholarship on key concepts such as complexity, uncertainty, fragility, and robustness, as well as a critical look at the historical roots of the field and related areas such as systems engineering, systems dynamics, agent modeling, and systems simulations. Contextual applications of the course range from aerospace to technology implementation to regulatory systems to large–scale systems change. Special attention is given to the interdependence of social and technical dimensions of engineering systems.

Subjects

engineering systems | engineering systems | complexity | complexity | uncertainty | uncertainty | fragility | fragility | robustness | robustness | systems engineering | systems engineering | systems dynamics | systems dynamics | agent modeling | agent modeling | systems simulations | systems simulations | large-scale systems change | large-scale systems change | modeling paradigms | modeling paradigms | cumulative knowledge | cumulative knowledge | empirical data generation | empirical data generation | boundary setting | boundary setting | network models | network models | policy evaluation | policy evaluation

License

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