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2.7 Overview: Kant and Modern Science

Description

Part 2.7. Concludes a historical survey of philosophy with Immanuel Kant, who thought Hume was wrong in his idea of human nature and how we gain knowledge of the world. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immanuel kant | kant | philosophy | history | hume | immanuel kant | kant | philosophy | history | hume

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1.4 From Galileo to Descartes

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Part 1.4. Outlines Galileo's revolutionary theories of astronomy and mechanical science and introduces Descartes' (the father of modern philosophy) ideas of philosophical scepticism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

scepticism | descartes | meditations | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | skepticism | astronomy | scepticism | descartes | meditations | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | skepticism | astronomy

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2.4 John Locke

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Part 2.4. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism | perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism

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2.7 Overview: Kant and Modern Science

Description

Part 2.7. Concludes a historical survey of philosophy with Immanuel Kant, who thought Hume was wrong in his idea of human nature and how we gain knowledge of the world. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

immanuel kant | kant | philosophy | history | hume | immanuel kant | kant | philosophy | history | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.4 John Locke

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Part 2.4. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc).

Subjects

perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism | perception | treatise | locke | government | philosophy | human understanding | empiricism | rationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Introducing philosophy

Description

Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study the OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.

Subjects

arts and history | civilised_society | freedom | humanities | philosophers | philosophy | study skills | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Imagination: the missing mystery of philosophy

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What is imagination and can philosophy define it in any meaningful way? This unit will introduce you to some of the possible answers to these questions and will examine why philosophy has sometimes found it difficult to approach imagination. It will then go on to examine the relationship that imagination has to imagery and supposition, charting where these concepts overlap with imagination and where they diverge.

Subjects

arts and history | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Minds

Description

Stephen Butterfill gives a talk on philosophy and collective agency and other people's minds When friends walk together, they typically exercise collective agency. By contrast, two strangers walking side by side exercise parallel but merely individual agency. This and other contrasts invite the question, What distinguishes collective agency from parallel but merely individual agency? To answer this question, philosophers standardly appeal to a special kind of intention or structure of intention, knowledge or commitment often called ?collective intention?. The idea is that exercises of collective agency stand to collective intention much as exercises of ordinary, individual agency stand to ordinary, individual intention. In this talk I shall use this parallel between individual and col Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | psychology | philosophy | psychology

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Aristotle on Singular Thought

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Mika Perala gives a talk on Aristotle's philosophy Aristotle states in the De Memoria et Reminiscentia that we have memories of individuals such as Koriscus. In line with this, he assumes in many contexts (e.g. logical and ethical) that we can make singular propositions on the basis of such perceptual states. However, commentators have been puzzled about whether singular propositions (and thoughts) can be given an adequate account in Aristotle?s psychological theory. The purpose of this paper is to argue that Aristotle?s account of thought admits of two kinds of singular thought: thought about an individual as an instance of a kind (?This F is G?) and thought simply about an individual ?a?, without the sortal concept F (?a is G?). The difference between the two is that whe Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | philosophy | aristotle

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Multimodal Perception and the Distinction Between the Senses

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Louise Fiona Richardson gives a talk on philosophy and perception It is beyond dispute that the senses interact. In this paper I will consider the way in which such interaction constrains thought about the senses, and in particular, thought about how they are distinguished from one another. I will consider two views of what it is to have a sense. On the first view, senses are systems. On the second, they are capacities. I will argue that on each view, the occurrence of different forms of multimodal perception rules out some views of how the senses are distinguished. The occurrence of perception not restricted to one sense does not, however, make it impossible to distinguish between the senses, either as systems or capacities. Neither does it make that distinction otiose. And whilst there i Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | perception | Multimodal Perception | philosophy | perception | Multimodal Perception

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Causal Power of Structure and the Role of Intellect

Description

Howard Robinson gives a talk on philosophy and the role of the intellect Abstract: First, I will consider Jaworski?s interesting recent attempt to defend hylomorphism, understood as the irreducible and the causal efficacy of structure. I shall reject this as unsuccessful, then try to see where this leaves us. I shall develop what I?ll dub the ?radically dualist? option, according to which the fundamental physical level and the mind are the only fundamental levels. This will involve looking at different interpretations of the question ?are there any Fs?? ? roughly, the realist and conceptualist interpretations. I shall then look at how this relates to the Aristotelian/Wigginsian treatment of our common-sense ontology, especially the reality of biological entities Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | philosophy | aristotle

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Aristotle on the Problem of Common Sensibles

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Anna Marmodoro gives a talk on Aristotle and his philosophy Aristotle draws a distinction between qualities that are perceptible via a single sense only, the special sensibles, and qualities that are perceptible by more than one sense at once, the common sensibles. What are the ontology and the epistemology of the common sensibles, in light of Aristotle?s assumption that each sense organ is sensitive to only its own special sensibles? Does the problem of common sensibles give us reasons for giving up a ?separatist? view of sense experiences? Or rather can it be solved by postulating extra perceptual powers for the senses? Are more ?parsimonious? options viable? In this paper I engage with these and related questions, which have attracted the interest of Aristotelian scholars (Gre Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | power structuralism | ontologies | philosophy | aristotle | power structuralism | ontologies

License

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Aristotle on the Happiness of the City

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Don Morison (Rice) gives a talk for the Power Structualism in Ancient Ontology series. Abstract: 'The happiness of the city (the eudaimonia of the polis) is a central concept in Aristotle?s political philosophy. For example, in NE I, 2, Aristotle says that the ultimate end of human action is the good of the city. At the beginning of his discussion of the ideal regime in Politics VII, 1, he says that the happy city is the one that is best and acts nobly?. Chapter 2 of book VII is devoted to the question whether the happiness of the individual and the happiness of the city are the same or different. The aim of this paper will be to argue that Aristotle uses the term ?the happiness of the city?, he means it not metaphorically, but literally: he intends to predicate a genuine property Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | metaphysics | realism | aristotle | philosophy | metaphysics | realism | aristotle

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Inclination and the Modality of Dispositions

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Mark Sinclair (Manchester Metropolitan) gives a talk for the Power Structualism in Ancient Ontologies series In Getting Causes from Powers, Steven Mumford and Rani Lil Anjum have argued that all dispositions are to be thought as tendencies or inclinations; that such tendencies or inclinations have a sui generis modality, irreducible to traditional ideas of necessity or possibility; and that we have direct experience of such inclinations in our subjective experience of agency. In this paper, I critically assess these arguments in the light of 19th-century French philosophy. I turn to the work of Pierre Maine de Biran and Félix Ravaisson in order to develop the claim that a particular and irreducible modality of dispositions is indeed available to us in subjective experience ? but in the Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | morality | ethics | inclination | philosophy | morality | ethics | inclination

License

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s Philosophy of Art

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosop-hy, University of Oxford gives his first lecture in the Aesthetics series on Plato's philosophy of Art. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics | art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics

License

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s Poetics

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James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his second lecture in the Aesthetics series on Aristotle's Poetics. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | philosophy | art | aristotle | aesthetics | philosophy | art | aristotle

License

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3. Hume and the Standard of Taste

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his third lecture in the Aesthetics series on Hume and the Standard of Taste. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | philosophy | art | hume | aesthetics | philosophy | art | hume

License

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 1

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his fourth lecture in the Aesthetics series on Kant's Critique of Judgement. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

License

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s Critique of Judgement: Lecture 2

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford concludes his discussion of Kant's Critique of Judgement in the fifth lecture of the Aesthetics series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement | aesthetics | kant | philosophy | art | critique of judgement

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6. Literary Interpretation

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his sixth lecture in the Aesthetics series on the interpretation of literature. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | literary theory | philosophy | art | literature | aesthetics | literary theory | philosophy | art | literature

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8. Defining Art

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosophy, University of Oxford gives his eight and final lecture in the Aesthetics series on Defining Art. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

aesthetics | literature | art | philosophy | aesthetics | literature | art | philosophy

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1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Part 1.2. Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period.

Subjects

plato | aristotle | stoics | epicureans | christianity | middle ages | renaissance | philosophy | aquinas | v500 | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Part 1.2. Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period.

Subjects

plato | aristotle | stoics | epicureans | christianity | middle ages | renaissance | philosophy | aquinas | v500 | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Ethics and politics

Description

Moral and Political Philosophy: how should we live? What constitutes a just state?

Subjects

philosophy | ethical philosophy | political philosophy | v500 | v520 | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Internet for philosophy

Description

Internet for philosophy is a tutorial from the Virtual Training Suite. The Virtual Training Suite tutorials aim to help university and college students to develop Internet research skills to assist with their coursework and assignments. The tutorials were written by a national team of UK university or college lecturers and librarians. They recommend key websites in their subject and help students to make discerning use of the Internet to help find information for coursework, literature reviews or personal research. This is an archived version of the tutorial. As of the 1st of August 2011 any further development of the tutorials is being undertaken by TutorPro at http://www.vtstutorials.co.uk

Subjects

philosophy | digital literacy | internet research skills | virtual training suite | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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