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17.881 Game Theory and Political Theory (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, political scientists are using game theory to analyze strategic interactions across many different settings. Each of the sub-fields, to differing degrees, has seen game theoretic concepts enter its vocabulary, and students entering the profession will need to understand the potential and limits of game theory. This course aims to give students an entry-level understanding of the basic concepts of game theory, and how these concepts have been applied to the study of political phenomena. Because an important component of game theory in political science and political economy is the analysis of substantive political phenomena, we will cover illustrative examples each week in combination with methodological developments. The political and economic phenomena that we will examine

Subjects

game theory | game theoretic concepts | games of complete information | games of incomplete information | political phenomena | legislative rules | nuclear deterrence | electoral competition | imperfect markets | probability | calculus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The 1790s and after

Description

Presenter Oscar Cox Jensen (KCL) and discussant Jon Mee (York) look at Mark Philp's work focusing on the 1790s and after This talk, introduced by current Head of Department Elizabeth Frazer, is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdisciplinarity as well as the excellence of their scholarship and depth of philosophical analysis. The event took place at the Department of Politics and International Relations on 22 April 2014. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Mark Philp | political theory | political history | nineteenth century | Mark Philp | political theory | political history | nineteenth century | 2014-04-22

License

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.080 Youth Political Participation (MIT)

Description

This course places contemporary youth activities in perspective by surveying young American's political participation over the past 200 years. Each week, students will look at trends in youth political activism during a specific historical period, as well as what difference—if any—youth media production and technology use (radio, music, automobiles, ready-made clothing) made in determining the course of events. A central theme in accounts of political participation by those who have not yet reached the age of majority are the opportunities for mobilization and expression that new technologies supply. This class explores what is truly new about "new media" and reviews lessons from history for present-day activists based on patterns of past failure and success.

Subjects

politics | youth politics | political history | political participation | new media | technology | political activism | activism | youth groups | youth activism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT) 17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature. This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature.

Subjects

political science | political science | public opinion | public opinion | voting | voting | elections | elections | empirical research | empirical research | analysis | analysis | ideology | ideology | american | american | society | society | media | media | public policy | public policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | democracy | democracy | theory | theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Independent. Neutral. Impartial. Political? MSF and the EU Refugee Crisis Independent. Neutral. Impartial. Political? MSF and the EU Refugee Crisis

Description

On 17 June 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International tweeted: ‘We cannot accept funding from the EU or the Member States while at the same time treating the victims of their polices! It’s that simple.’ The decision is a vivid example of MSF’s political engagement, this time in reaction to EU policies aiming to deter immigration. However, MSF’s actions sit uneasily with the organisation’s politically neutral and impartial public image. The political aspects of its work are not well-captured by the principles of independence, neutrality and impartiality that MSF celebrates, an issue that may hinder members of the public from ... On 17 June 2016, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International tweeted: ‘We cannot accept funding from the EU or the Member States while at the same time treating the victims of their polices! It’s that simple.’ The decision is a vivid example of MSF’s political engagement, this time in reaction to EU policies aiming to deter immigration. However, MSF’s actions sit uneasily with the organisation’s politically neutral and impartial public image. The political aspects of its work are not well-captured by the principles of independence, neutrality and impartiality that MSF celebrates, an issue that may hinder members of the public from ...

Subjects

The EU and European Politics | The EU and European Politics | EU | EU | MSF | MSF | Refugee crisis | Refugee crisis

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Statelessness and citizenship: camps and the creation of political space

Description

Public Seminar Series, Hilary term 2013. Seminar by Dr Victoria Redclift (London School of Economics) recorded on 20 February 2013 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. What does it mean to be a citizen? In depth field research with a stateless population in Bangladesh reveals that the limits of political community are not set in stone. The Urdu speaking population in Bangladesh exemplify some of the key problems facing uprooted populations. Set in a site of camp and non camp based displacement, their experiences illustrate the nuances of political identity, and lived spaces of statelessness, that Western political theory has too long hidden from view. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

political space | camps | statelessness | citizenship | political space | camps | statelessness | citizenship

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How political philosophy helps us respond to Europe’s migration crisis How political philosophy helps us respond to Europe’s migration crisis

Description

The European migration crisis of 2015 has created a huge political challenge for the states that have to respond to the mass migration of people from the Middle East and elsewhere across the continent. But it has also produced a large philosophical challenge to those of us who have been trying to develop principles to apply to the immigration policies of democratic states. It is tempting to respond to the migration crisis on an emotional basis. Our sympathies go out to the people making arduous journeys across the Mediterranean or up through southern Europe. But as citizens we need to ... The post How political philosophy helps us respond to Europe’s migration crisis appeared first on OxPol. The European migration crisis of 2015 has created a huge political challenge for the states that have to respond to the mass migration of people from the Middle East and elsewhere across the continent. But it has also produced a large philosophical challenge to those of us who have been trying to develop principles to apply to the immigration policies of democratic states. It is tempting to respond to the migration crisis on an emotional basis. Our sympathies go out to the people making arduous journeys across the Mediterranean or up through southern Europe. But as citizens we need to ... The post How political philosophy helps us respond to Europe’s migration crisis appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives. Implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrialized nations | industrialized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business | aging | aging | population | population | countries | countries | developing | developing | development | development | industrial | industrial | industrialized | industrialized | nations | nations | politics | politics | political | political | theory | theory | sustainable | sustainable | public | public | policy | policy | sustainability | sustainability | economies | economies | transition | transition | growth | growth | institutions | institutions | institutional | institutional | trade | trade | international | international

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to Western Political Thought

Description

Political thought, otherwise known as political theory or philosophy, is the study of questions concerning power, justice, rights, law, and other issues pertaining to governance. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and asks how different views on human nature inform the design of government. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Political Science 201)

Subjects

political thought | political theory | political philosophy | political science | rule of law | sovereignty | constitution | government | democracy | civil liberties | regime | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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American Political Thought

Description

This course will cover American political thought from the nation’s founding through the 1960s, exploring the political theories that have shaped its governance. As there is no one philosopher or idea that represents the totality of American political thought, the student will survey the writings and speeches of those who have had the greatest impact over this period of time. Much of the study required in this course is based on the original texts and speeches of those who influenced political thought throughout American history. The student will learn and understand the impact that their views and actions have had on the modern American state. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Political Science 301)

Subjects

political thought | america | government | political science | american history | constitution | republic | democracy | federalism | capitalism | progressivism | civil rights | conservatism | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.561 European Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the organization of political power and the dynamics of political change in Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. In particular, it focuses on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.

Subjects

European politics | political power | Britain | France | Germany | Italy | political parties | social class | citizenship | prime ministers | economy | dictatorship | democracy | capitalism | labour | liberalization | history | corruption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Approaches to political studies Approaches to political studies

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module introduces students to alternative theoretical approaches to the study of political phenomena. We consider the different forms of analysing, explaining, and understanding politics associated with approaches such as behaviouralism, rational choice theory, institutionalism, Marxism, feminism, interpretive theory and post-modernism. This module shows that the different approaches are based upon contrasting ‘ontological’ suppositions about the nature of politics, and they invoke alternative ‘epistemological’ assumptions about how we acquire valid knowledge of politics and international relations. We examine questions such as: what constitutes valid knowledge This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module introduces students to alternative theoretical approaches to the study of political phenomena. We consider the different forms of analysing, explaining, and understanding politics associated with approaches such as behaviouralism, rational choice theory, institutionalism, Marxism, feminism, interpretive theory and post-modernism. This module shows that the different approaches are based upon contrasting ‘ontological’ suppositions about the nature of politics, and they invoke alternative ‘epistemological’ assumptions about how we acquire valid knowledge of politics and international relations. We examine questions such as: what constitutes valid knowledge

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M12037 | M12037 | ukoer | ukoer | political phenomena | political phenomena | behaviouralism | behaviouralism | rational choice theory | rational choice theory | institutionalism | institutionalism | Marxism | Marxism | interpretive theory | interpretive theory | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries.

Subjects

urban design | urban politics | design politics | political extremes | urban resilience | public housing | architecture | political values | aesthetics | gender politics | power | capitol design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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European Sovereignty and federalism: a necessary alliance to rescue political agency European Sovereignty and federalism: a necessary alliance to rescue political agency

Description

Populism and euroscepticism are on the rise everywhere in Europe. No longer confined to the margins of the political spectrum, they have become increasingly close to the mainstream. These movements perceive Europe as the main cause of all the current ills affecting our societies – immigration, unemployment, low growth, poverty and insecurity. But this is not a purely contingent phenomenon. The upsurge of these movements can only be explained by deep causes related to long-term historical evolutions. If one accepts this premise, only alternatives addressing these underlying factors are likely to constitute adequate responses to this phenomenon. This is exactly ... The post European Sovereignty and federalism: a necessary alliance to rescue political agency appeared first on OxPol. Populism and euroscepticism are on the rise everywhere in Europe. No longer confined to the margins of the political spectrum, they have become increasingly close to the mainstream. These movements perceive Europe as the main cause of all the current ills affecting our societies – immigration, unemployment, low growth, poverty and insecurity. But this is not a purely contingent phenomenon. The upsurge of these movements can only be explained by deep causes related to long-term historical evolutions. If one accepts this premise, only alternatives addressing these underlying factors are likely to constitute adequate responses to this phenomenon. This is exactly ... The post European Sovereignty and federalism: a necessary alliance to rescue political agency appeared first on OxPol.

Subjects

European Union | European Union | Federalism | Federalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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