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Going into Politics? Tales from an Academic in Westminster

Description

Professor Marc Stears reflects on his experiences. Marc Stears is a Professor of Political Theory and fellow at University College. He is the author of Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics and is one of the co-editors of the widely discussed The Labour Tradition and the Politics of Paradox. He is currently visiting fellow at Britain's leading think tank, the Institute for Public Policy Research, and he works closely with many of Britain's most prominent politicians on questions of political strategy and communication. Chaired by Mark Philp, Fellow and Tutor in Politics at Oriel College who works on political theory, the history of political thought, and is interested in political ethics, corruption and standards in public life. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | alumni | academia in politics | politics | alumni | academia in politics | 2012-09-15

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21G.704 Spanish IV (MIT) 21G.704 Spanish IV (MIT)

Description

Course Sequences Spanish IV aims at developing and improving student's oral and written communication through the continued study of the language, literature and culture of Spain, Latin America and Hispanic communities in the United States. It also seeks to improve students' ability to read and appreciate literary and non-literary texts in Spanish, deepening this way students' awareness and understanding of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. The course is organized by themes based on contemporary social, political and cultural issues of Spanish-speaking societies such as: cultural identity, the changing roles of women and family, economic development and its effects on cultural heritage and environment, and the individual's rights in the political system. Course Sequences Spanish IV aims at developing and improving student's oral and written communication through the continued study of the language, literature and culture of Spain, Latin America and Hispanic communities in the United States. It also seeks to improve students' ability to read and appreciate literary and non-literary texts in Spanish, deepening this way students' awareness and understanding of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. The course is organized by themes based on contemporary social, political and cultural issues of Spanish-speaking societies such as: cultural identity, the changing roles of women and family, economic development and its effects on cultural heritage and environment, and the individual's rights in the political system.

Subjects

spanish | spanish | foreign language | foreign language | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | literature | literature | culture | culture | history | history | society | society | hispanic | hispanic | latin america | latin america | western europe | western europe | spain | spain | central america | central america | south america | south america | identity | identity | politics | politics | family | family | economy | economy | tradition | tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and

Subjects

public sector | public sector | policies | policies | programs | programs | projects | projects | poverty | poverty | unemployment | unemployment | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | informal sector | informal sector | small enterprises | small enterprises | political economy | political economy | local economic development initiatives | local economic development initiatives | implementation | implementation | worker conditions | worker conditions | associations | associations | government reform | government reform | poverty reduction | poverty reduction | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

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21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT) 21H.405J The Ancient City (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism. This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world, by analyzing a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subjects

21H.405 | 21H.405 | 11.012 | 11.012 | archaeology | archaeology | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Greek | Greek | Roman | Roman | city | city | urban | urban | architecture | architecture | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | literary | literary | evidence | evidence | space | space | Athens | Athens | Paestum | Paestum | Pompeii | Pompeii | theoretical frameworks | theoretical frameworks | ancient urbanism | ancient urbanism | 21.405 | 21.405 | 11.021J | 11.021J | 11.02 | 11.02

License

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11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making.Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public policy Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making.Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public policy

Subjects

policy-making | policy-making | problem-solving process | problem-solving process | political process | political process | administrative agencies | administrative agencies | legislators | legislators | the courts | the courts | the mass public | the mass public | interest groups | interest groups | media | media | policy development | policy development | empirical models | empirical models | public policy | public policy | 11.002 | 11.002 | 17.30 | 17.30

License

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Empire | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Pugachev | nobility | Constitution | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Decembrists | serfdom | Alexander II | Great reforms | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Chechnya | Lenin | World War I | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Russia | social heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | political reform | political revolution | revolutionary | debates | capitalism | historical texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | 19th century | major European power | intellectual class | autocratic order | states | societies | West | national consciousness | state | society

License

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11.013J American Urban History I (MIT) 11.013J American Urban History I (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions. This course is a seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. The focus of the course is on readings and discussions.

Subjects

11.013 | 11.013 | 21H.231 | 21H.231 | American urban history | American urban history | political machines | political machines | police | police | courts | courts | schools | schools | welfare | welfare | prisons | prisons | hospitals | hospitals | universities | universities | electric railways | electric railways | public authorities | public authorities | housing | housing

License

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

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STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT) STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | History | food | food | analysis | analysis | transform | transform | technological innovations | technological innovations | preserve | preserve | surplus | surplus | drying | drying | freezing | freezing | canning | canning | salting | salting | travel | travel | space | space | lived | lived | relations | relations | neighbors | neighbors | relatives | relatives | economic order | economic order | capitalism | capitalism | preservation | preservation | development | development | cultural | cultural | political | political | economic | economic | techno-scientific history | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | consumption | vertical integration | vertical integration | business firms | business firms | globalization | globalization | race | race | gender identities | gender identities | labor movements | labor movements | America | America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | economics | political economy | democratic | countries | collective | choice | electoral competiton | public goods | size | government | taxation | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | voting models | equilibrium models | information | learning | agency models | political parties | vote-buying | vote-trading | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | lobbying | legislatures | bargaining | coalitions | stability | informational | distributive | theories | executive | relations | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Primaries as Sports and Spectacle: Sports Metaphors in Twenty-First Century Presidential Primary Debates Primaries as Sports and Spectacle: Sports Metaphors in Twenty-First Century Presidential Primary Debates

Description

‘The Brawl Begins’, an article about the 2016 primaries in The Economist provides the most overt manifestation of how a discourse of sports has permeated contemporary political reporting. Describing elections as a “jaw-dropping spectacle” or referring to the Iowa caucuses as the “opening round” in a political boxing match, a prime example of horse-race journalism, is particularly prevalent in presidential primary elections. This is due to the lengthening of the primary period and the truism that the “newsworthiness of what a candidate says about public policies is limited” because “once a candidate makes known his position on an issue, further statements concerning ... ‘The Brawl Begins’, an article about the 2016 primaries in The Economist provides the most overt manifestation of how a discourse of sports has permeated contemporary political reporting. Describing elections as a “jaw-dropping spectacle” or referring to the Iowa caucuses as the “opening round” in a political boxing match, a prime example of horse-race journalism, is particularly prevalent in presidential primary elections. This is due to the lengthening of the primary period and the truism that the “newsworthiness of what a candidate says about public policies is limited” because “once a candidate makes known his position on an issue, further statements concerning ...

Subjects

Democracy and Elections | Democracy and Elections | Media | Media | US Politics | US Politics | American Politics | American Politics | Sport | Sport | US Elections | US Elections

License

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The history of Sir George Warrington: or the political Quixote. By the author of The female Quixote. In three volumes. ... [pt.1] The history of Sir George Warrington: or the political Quixote. By the author of The female Quixote. In three volumes. ... [pt.1]

Description

ebook version of The history of Sir George Warrington: or the political Quixote. By the author of The female Quixote. In three volumes. ... [pt.1] ebook version of The history of Sir George Warrington: or the political Quixote. By the author of The female Quixote. In three volumes. ... [pt.1]

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT) 17.315 Comparative Health Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also e

Subjects

Health care | Health care | policy | policy | United States | United States | medical services | medical services | health care costs | health care costs | markets | markets | regulatory policy | regulatory policy | Canada | Canada | Great Britian | Great Britian | Japan | Japan | Germany | Germany | technology | technology | decentralization | decentralization | health risks | health risks | comparative prospectives | comparative prospectives | access | access | reform | reform | political | political | organizational | organizational | factors | factors

License

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4.285 Research Topics in Architecture: Citizen-Centered Design of Open Governance Systems (MIT) 4.285 Research Topics in Architecture: Citizen-Centered Design of Open Governance Systems (MIT)

Description

In this seminar, students will design and perfect a digital environment to house the activities of large-scale organizations of people making bottom-up decisions, such as with citizen-government affairs, voting corporate shareholders or voting members of global non-profits and labor unions. A working Open Source prototype created last semester will be used as the starting point, featuring collaborative filtering and electronic agent technology pioneered at the Media Lab. This course focuses on development of online spaces as part of an interdependent human environment, including physical architectures, mapped work processes and social/political dimensions. A cross-disciplinary approach will be taken; students with background in architecture, urban planning, law, cognition, business, digita In this seminar, students will design and perfect a digital environment to house the activities of large-scale organizations of people making bottom-up decisions, such as with citizen-government affairs, voting corporate shareholders or voting members of global non-profits and labor unions. A working Open Source prototype created last semester will be used as the starting point, featuring collaborative filtering and electronic agent technology pioneered at the Media Lab. This course focuses on development of online spaces as part of an interdependent human environment, including physical architectures, mapped work processes and social/political dimensions. A cross-disciplinary approach will be taken; students with background in architecture, urban planning, law, cognition, business, digita

Subjects

networked computers | networked computers | Digital environment | Digital environment | Online spaces as part of an interdependent human environment | Online spaces as part of an interdependent human environment | Physical architectures | Physical architectures | Mapped work processes | Mapped work processes | Social/political dimensions | Social/political dimensions

License

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Liberty chastised: or patriotism in chains. A tragi, comi, political farce, as it was performed by his M-'s S-ts, in the year 1268; ... Scenes near the P- and in St. Gregoir's Fields. Modernised by Paul Tell-Truth, Esq Liberty chastised: or patriotism in chains. A tragi, comi, political farce, as it was performed by his M-'s S-ts, in the year 1268; ... Scenes near the P- and in St. Gregoir's Fields. Modernised by Paul Tell-Truth, Esq

Description

ebook version of Liberty chastised: or patriotism in chains. A tragi, comi, political farce, as it was performed by his M-'s S-ts, in the year 1268; ... Scenes near the P- and in St. Gregoir's Fields. Modernised by Paul Tell-Truth, Esq ebook version of Liberty chastised: or patriotism in chains. A tragi, comi, political farce, as it was performed by his M-'s S-ts, in the year 1268; ... Scenes near the P- and in St. Gregoir's Fields. Modernised by Paul Tell-Truth, Esq

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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The free-holder: or political essays. The free-holder: or political essays.

Description

ebook version of The free-holder: or political essays. ebook version of The free-holder: or political essays.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w

Subjects

moral and political position of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | Whitman | Williams | Lowell | Plath | Bishop | Czeslaw Milosz | poet | Yeats | Nerud | Akhmatova | Szymborska

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Introduction to Western Political Thought

Description

This Saylor course examines major texts in the history of political thought.A wide variety of political and radical thinkers are discussed in terms of how they helped to shape various forms of government, from tyranny to republican democracy to welfare states.

Subjects

politics | political thought | westrn politics | political thinkers | activists | saylor | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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political preferences across Europe

Description

Laura Morales compares the political party preferences of migrants across Europe The objective of this paper is to study the party preferences of migrants in a comparative perspective. While long considered politically quiescent, recent studies show that migrants participate politically in their settlement countries. While in the US there is a long tradition of studies of ethnic minorities? party preferences, European scholars have only recently addressed the issue using mainly case studies. Drawing on prior studies on the voting behavior of migrants and ethnic minorities, we test several hypotheses related to individual and contextual factors explaining the formation and the direction of migrants? party preferences. Using data from individual surveys conducted in the context of the L Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

policy | politics | migration | europe | policy | politics | migration | europe | 2016-03-02

License

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11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT) 11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT)

Description

This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future. This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future.

Subjects

planning | planning | politics | politics | post-conflict reconstruction | post-conflict reconstruction | Marshall Plan | Marshall Plan | reconstruction of Japan | reconstruction of Japan | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bosnia and Herzegovina | September 11 reconstruction | September 11 reconstruction | Iraq politics and society | Iraq politics and society | post-war planning | post-war planning | building democracy | building democracy | international organizations | international organizations | Iraqi-Arab discourse | Iraqi-Arab discourse | vision | vision | stability | stability | resistance | resistance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Essays, moral and political Essays, moral and political

Description

ebook version of Essays, moral and political ebook version of Essays, moral and political

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Impact of Brexit on Europe-China Relations The Impact of Brexit on Europe-China Relations

Description

The decision of the United Kingdom (UK) to leave the European Union (EU) in the referendum of June 23rd 2016 has reverberations well beyond Europe as a political and economic shock of substantial proportions. The future relationship of China, both with the remaining member states of the EU and with the UK, is one example of how a domestic political decision is having global ramifications as change ripples through the international system. Overarching any analysis about the impact of Brexit must be a sense of caution about what still remains unknown over the shape of future policy outcomes. Two cross-cutting ... The decision of the United Kingdom (UK) to leave the European Union (EU) in the referendum of June 23rd 2016 has reverberations well beyond Europe as a political and economic shock of substantial proportions. The future relationship of China, both with the remaining member states of the EU and with the UK, is one example of how a domestic political decision is having global ramifications as change ripples through the international system. Overarching any analysis about the impact of Brexit must be a sense of caution about what still remains unknown over the shape of future policy outcomes. Two cross-cutting ...

Subjects

Brexit | Brexit | brexit | brexit | china | china | EU | EU

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | rational choice | legislature | bureaucracy | court | and elections | electoral competition | comparative | international | public goods | government | taxation | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | electoral system | voter | agency models | models of political parties | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | minorities | interest groups | lobbying | bargaining | coalitions | government stability | informational theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT) 17.181 Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (MIT)

Description

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance. This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | sustainable development | sustainable development | industrial ized nations | industrial ized nations | aging population | aging population | consumption | consumption | developing countries | developing countries | economics | economics | production | production | sociology | sociology | technology | technology | regulation | regulation | public policy | public policy | environment | environment | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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