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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT) 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping. This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping.

Subjects

consumer behavior | consumer behavior | producer behavior | producer behavior | welfare analysis | welfare analysis | measurement of productivity | measurement of productivity | rationing | rationing | insurance markets | insurance markets | intertemporal behavior | intertemporal behavior

License

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory | producer theory | partial equilibrium | partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | afriat's theorem | afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics

License

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation. This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition to several shorter pieces; it also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through student-led discussion, class reports, and class participation.

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Satire | Satire | Greek | Greek | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Writing | Writing | Literature | Literature | Communications | Communications | Cervantes | Cervantes | comedies | comedies | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature

License

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

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14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT) 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping. This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and Internet shopping.

Subjects

consumer behavior | consumer behavior | producer behavior | producer behavior | welfare analysis | welfare analysis | measurement of productivity | measurement of productivity | rationing | rationing | insurance markets | insurance markets | intertemporal behavior | intertemporal behavior

License

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Occasional observations on a double-titled-paper, about the clear produce of the civil-list revenue, from midsummer 1727, to midsummer last Occasional observations on a double-titled-paper, about the clear produce of the civil-list revenue, from midsummer 1727, to midsummer last

Description

ebook version of Occasional observations on a double-titled-paper, about the clear produce of the civil-list revenue, from midsummer 1727, to midsummer last ebook version of Occasional observations on a double-titled-paper, about the clear produce of the civil-list revenue, from midsummer 1727, to midsummer last

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT) 3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | magnetic field | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | Mr. Magnet | levitation | levitation | hard disk | hard disk | magnetoptic | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | imaging | imaging | SQUID | SQUID | biomagnetism | biomagnetism | NMR | NMR

License

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

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14.03 Microeconomic Theory and Public Policy (MIT) 14.03 Microeconomic Theory and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and real estate markets. This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, asymmetric information, and imperfect rationality. We apply this material to policy debates including minimum wage regulations, food stamp provision, trade protection, educational credentials, health insurance markets, and real estate markets.

Subjects

consumer behavior | consumer behavior | producer behavior | producer behavior | welfare analysis | welfare analysis | measurement of productivity | measurement of productivity | rationing | rationing | insurance markets | insurance markets | intertemporal behavior | intertemporal behavior

License

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15.010 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions (MIT) 15.010 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions (MIT)

Description

15.010 is the Sloan School's core subject in microeconomics, with sections for non-Sloan students labeled 15.011. Our objective is to give you a working knowledge of the analytical tools that bear most directly on the economic decisions firms must regularly make. We will emphasize market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets -- and the producers and consumers that sell and buy in those markets -- in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, pricing strategy, market power, and the implications of government regulatory policies. We will also examine the implications of economics on other business practices, such as incentive plans, auctions, and transfer pricing. 15.010 is the Sloan School's core subject in microeconomics, with sections for non-Sloan students labeled 15.011. Our objective is to give you a working knowledge of the analytical tools that bear most directly on the economic decisions firms must regularly make. We will emphasize market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets -- and the producers and consumers that sell and buy in those markets -- in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, pricing strategy, market power, and the implications of government regulatory policies. We will also examine the implications of economics on other business practices, such as incentive plans, auctions, and transfer pricing.

Subjects

auctions | auctions | transfer pricing | transfer pricing | market structure | market structure | industrial performance | industrial performance | strategic interaction of firms | strategic interaction of firms | individual markets | individual markets | producers and consumers | producers and consumers | sell and buy | sell and buy | cost analysis | cost analysis | determinants of market demand | determinants of market demand | pricing strategy | pricing strategy | market power | market power | implications of government regulatory policies | implications of government regulatory policies | implications of economics | implications of economics | business practices | business practices | incentive plans | incentive plans

License

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification. Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | literate | literate | critical | critical | consumers | consumers | producers | producers | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | comparative | comparative | historical | historical | lens | lens | the course defines oral | the course defines oral | print | print | performance | performance | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | digital | digital | cultural | cultural | forms | forms | practices | practices | mediated communication | mediated communication | functions | functions | society | society | network culture | network culture | media convergence | media convergence | Intellectual Property | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | peer2peer authoring | blogging | blogging | game modification | game modification | lens | the course defines oral | lens | the course defines oral

License

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 1401: Aluminium Powder Metallurgy

Description

This lecture outlines the differences between conventionally produced and powder metallurgy aluminium with respect to potential uses; it aims at learning about the various processes to produce and to consolidate alloy powders; it illustrates the extension of the useful property range beyond that of limits of conventionally processed aluminium alloys; it explains the advantages and disadvantages of aluminium produced by powder metallurgy; it shows the potential of aluminium produced by the route of powder metallurgy. Knowledge in metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | advanced materials | powder fabrication | rapid solidification | caracterisation | powder | precompaction | cold compaction | sintering | hot consolidation | post consolidation | spray forming | P/M 7 XXX alloys | high strength alloys | elevated temperatures | mechanical alloying | high modulus | safety | corematerials | ukoer

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT) 21L.455 Classical Literature: The Golden Age of Augustan Rome (MIT)

Description

Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon Roman Literature of the Golden Age of Augustus Caesar, produced during the transition from Republican to Imperial forms of government, was to have a profound and defining influence on Western European and American societies. These writings ultimately established lasting models of aesthetic refinement, philosophical aspiration, and political ambition that continue to shape modern cultures. This class will be exploring the Golden Age of Latin Literature from an historical perspective in order to provide an intensive examination of the cultural contexts in which these monumental works of classical art were first produced. Readings will emphasize the transition from a Republican form of government to an Empire under the rule of Augustus Caesar and the diversity of responses amon

Subjects

Classical roman literature | Classical roman literature | Augustan rome | Augustan rome | Augustus caesar | Augustus caesar | Golden age | Golden age | Republic | Republic | Imperial | Imperial | Western europe | Western europe | Philosophy | Philosophy | Society | Society | Aesthetic | Aesthetic | Politics | Politics | Latin | Latin | History | History | Culture | Culture | Art | Art | Cultural context | Cultural context | Textuality | Textuality | Empire | Empire | Public | Public | Private | Private | Class | Class | Gender | Gender | Pleasure | Pleasure | Caesar | Caesar | Cicero | Cicero | Catullus | Catullus | Livy | Livy | Virgil | Virgil | Horace | Horace | Ovid | Ovid | Cassius Dio | Cassius Dio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Machinima Machinima

Description

In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Conference, Hugh Hancock from The Strange Company gives industry insights into the world of Machinima and its role in the world of media ephemerality, and shows examples of his work. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Hugh Hancock, Artistic Director, Strange Company Hugh Hancock co-founded the Strange Company in 1997 which is the world's oldest pro 'Machinima' production company, making films in 3D virtual worlds to tell stories that couldn't be told any other way. Hugh Hancock and Gordon McDonald have produced award-winning independent films (including the feature-length 'BloodSpell') as well as In this presentation from the Institute of Film and Television Studies' Ephemeral Media Conference, Hugh Hancock from The Strange Company gives industry insights into the world of Machinima and its role in the world of media ephemerality, and shows examples of his work. Presentation produced/delivered: June/July 2009 Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education Author and Presenter: Hugh Hancock, Artistic Director, Strange Company Hugh Hancock co-founded the Strange Company in 1997 which is the world's oldest pro 'Machinima' production company, making films in 3D virtual worlds to tell stories that couldn't be told any other way. Hugh Hancock and Gordon McDonald have produced award-winning independent films (including the feature-length 'BloodSpell') as well as

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Ephemeral Media | Ephemeral Media | Animation | Animation | Computer Generated Animation | Computer Generated Animation | Film and Television Studies | Film and Television Studies | Humanities | Humanities | New Media | New Media | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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TALAT Lecture 1401: Aluminium Powder Metallurgy

Description

This lecture outlines the differences between conventionally produced and powder metallurgy aluminium with respect to potential uses; it aims at learning about the various processes to produce and to consolidate alloy powders; it illustrates the extension of the useful property range beyond that of limits of conventionally processed aluminium alloys; it explains the advantages and disadvantages of aluminium produced by powder metallurgy; it shows the potential of aluminium produced by the route of powder metallurgy. Knowledge in metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | advanced materials | powder fabrication | rapid solidification | caracterisation | powder | precompaction | cold compaction | sintering | hot consolidation | post consolidation | spray forming | p/m 7 xxx alloys | high strength alloys | elevated temperatures | mechanical alloying | high modulus | safety | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Thinking about dyslexia Thinking about dyslexia

Description

The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr

Subjects

UNow | UNow | dyslexia | dyslexia | PESL | PESL | develop practice | develop practice | HEFCE Disability Funding | HEFCE Disability Funding | good practice | good practice | best practice | best practice | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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ía de la Instrucción (2014) ía de la Instrucción (2014)

Description

La Psicología de la Instrucción, como disciplina puente de naturaleza aplicada entre la Psicología y la Educación, tiene por objeto de estudio analizar los cambios de conducta que se producen en las personas por su participación en situaciones y actividades educativas que se producen en contextos, establecidos específicamente para producir estas situaciones. Su finalidad en el currículum de Psicología es, por tanto, dotar a los alumnos, tanto de instrumentos de análisis de estos cambios comportamentales, como dotarles de estrategias de intervención, a fin de que puedan orientar a aquellos profesionales cuya labor converge en el ámbito educativo formal, fundamentalmente, en lo que se refiere a la propuesta de diseños y programas de intervención escolar. La Psicología de la Instrucción, como disciplina puente de naturaleza aplicada entre la Psicología y la Educación, tiene por objeto de estudio analizar los cambios de conducta que se producen en las personas por su participación en situaciones y actividades educativas que se producen en contextos, establecidos específicamente para producir estas situaciones. Su finalidad en el currículum de Psicología es, por tanto, dotar a los alumnos, tanto de instrumentos de análisis de estos cambios comportamentales, como dotarles de estrategias de intervención, a fin de que puedan orientar a aquellos profesionales cuya labor converge en el ámbito educativo formal, fundamentalmente, en lo que se refiere a la propuesta de diseños y programas de intervención escolar.

Subjects

aptitudes | aptitudes | aprendizaje | aprendizaje | ía Social | ía Social | estudiante | estudiante | rendimiento | rendimiento

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Analysing skid marks Analysing skid marks

Description

This free course, Analysing skid marks, is the second in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In it you are asked to relate the stages of the mathematical modelling process to a previously formulated mathematical model. This example, that of skid mark produced by vehicle tyres, is typical of accounts of modelling that you may see in books, or produced in the workplace. The aim of this course is to help you to draw out and to clarify mathematical modelling ideas by considering the example. It assumes that you have studied the course Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Analysing skid marks. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Analysing skid marks, is the second in the series of five courses on mathematical modelling. In it you are asked to relate the stages of the mathematical modelling process to a previously formulated mathematical model. This example, that of skid mark produced by vehicle tyres, is typical of accounts of modelling that you may see in books, or produced in the workplace. The aim of this course is to help you to draw out and to clarify mathematical modelling ideas by considering the example. It assumes that you have studied the course Modelling pollution in the Great Lakes. First published on Wed, 16 Mar 2016 as Analysing skid marks. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Statistics | Statistics | MSXR209_2 | MSXR209_2

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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User-produced Hebrew Prayer Books and Shared Iconography

Description

Some Hebrew manuscripts were produced in Christian workshops, others were made by Jewish artists themselves for their own use. Piet looks at examples of these and explores the shared iconography between Christian and Jewish faiths, such as the unicorn. Some Hebrew manuscripts were produced in Christian workshops, while others were made by Jewish artists themselves for their own use. An Ashkenazic siddur stands out as an example of a Jewish scribe-artist, influenced by the visual culture of his time, who drew on models, motifs and specialized techniques current in fifteenth-century Germany to illustrate his prayer book. Hebrew manuscripts shared iconography with other manuscripts from the same geo-cultural area. Italian Hebrew manuscripts thus recall the scenery of central Italy and depict Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

written word | christian | jews | manuscript | bible | muslim | torah | library | religion | bodleian | muslims | books | exhibition | hebrew | oxford | an | manuscripts | book | christians | Jew | an | manuscripts | book | christians | Jew | 2010-02-18

License

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User-produced Hebrew Prayer Books and Shared Iconography

Description

Some Hebrew manuscripts were produced in Christian workshops, others were made by Jewish artists themselves for their own use. Piet looks at examples of these and explores the shared iconography between Christian and Jewish faiths, such as the unicorn. Some Hebrew manuscripts were produced in Christian workshops, while others were made by Jewish artists themselves for their own use. An Ashkenazic siddur stands out as an example of a Jewish scribe-artist, influenced by the visual culture of his time, who drew on models, motifs and specialized techniques current in fifteenth-century Germany to illustrate his prayer book. Hebrew manuscripts shared iconography with other manuscripts from the same geo-cultural area. Italian Hebrew manuscripts thus recall the scenery of central Italy and depict Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

written word | christian | jews | manuscript | bible | muslim | torah | library | religion | bodleian | muslims | books | exhibition | hebrew | oxford | an | manuscripts | book | christians | Jew | an | manuscripts | book | christians | Jew | 2010-02-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Wrought-grade aluminium alloy

Description

The micrograph shows Al-Mg-Fe-Si containing < 1wt.% of each solute; refined with TiB2 particles. Deformation of grain structure is due to cutting of sample with scissors. This micrograph illustrates the effect of deformation on a previously equiaxed structure. Strain causes the elongation of grains and the subsequent anodising produces 'mottled' grain colours; the oxide layer is not of constant orientation or thickness across a grain.The Barker's etch and applied electrical field produce a thick oxide layer on the grains of aluminium (anodising). When viewed in cross-polarised light, interference in the oxide layer produces colours which depend on grain orientation and oxide thickness; hence the grain structure is imaged.

Subjects

alloy | aluminium | anodising | deformation | equiaxed | iron | magnesium | metal | silicon | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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