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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT) 21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | race | eugenics | eugenics | scientific racism | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial hygiene | racial economy | racial economy | human biodiversity | human biodiversity | apartheid | apartheid | race and gender | race and gender | monogenist | monogenist | polygenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi medicine | nazi racism | nazi racism | sociology of science | sociology of science | race and culture | race and culture | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | raciology. | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT) 24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race? This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | race | race | natural kinds | natural kinds | classification | classification | Appiah | Appiah | naming | naming | genomics | genomics | marriage | marriage | intermarriage | intermarriage | history of science | history of science | DNA | DNA | eugenics | eugenics | biology | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT) 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT)

Description

The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed. The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed.

Subjects

trace element geochemistry | trace element geochemistry | igneous rocks | igneous rocks | mineral | mineral | melt | melt | partition coefficient | partition coefficient | simple melt-solid systems | simple melt-solid systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.742J Writing About Race (MIT) 21W.742J Writing About Race (MIT)

Description

In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "...the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing to explore how the fictions and facts of race condition all our lives, social and civic, private and public. We will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the givens of history by uncovering histories that have bee In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "...the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing to explore how the fictions and facts of race condition all our lives, social and civic, private and public. We will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the givens of history by uncovering histories that have bee

Subjects

race | race | writing | writing | multiracial | multiracial | multi-race | multi-race | mixed-race | mixed-race | multiraciality | multiraciality | multiple descent | multiple descent | hybrid populations | hybrid populations | mixed ancestry | mixed ancestry | assimilation | assimilation | integration | integration | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | self | self | heritage | heritage | multicultural | multicultural | mixed heritage | mixed heritage | mulato | mulato | mestizo | mestizo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT) 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT)

Description

The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed. The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed.

Subjects

trace element geochemistry | trace element geochemistry | igneous rocks | igneous rocks | mineral | mineral | melt | melt | partition coefficient | partition coefficient | simple melt-solid systems | simple melt-solid systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT) 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry (MIT)

Description

The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed. The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed.

Subjects

trace element geochemistry | trace element geochemistry | igneous rocks | igneous rocks | mineral | mineral | melt | melt | partition coefficient | partition coefficient | simple melt-solid systems | simple melt-solid systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT) 21W.742J Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality (MIT)

Description

In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressin

Subjects

21W.742 | 21W.742 | WGS.231 | WGS.231 | multiracial | multiracial | multi-race | multi-race | mixed-race | mixed-race | multiraciality | multiraciality | multiple descent | multiple descent | hybrid populations | hybrid populations | mixed ancestry | mixed ancestry | race | race | assimilation | assimilation | integration | integration | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | self | self | heritage | heritage | multicultural | multicultural | mixed heritage | mixed heritage | mulato | mulato | mestizo | mestizo | oppression | oppression | immigration | immigration | diaspora | diaspora | racism | racism | sterotype | sterotype | family | family | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Luke Swailes, general dealer, arrested for receiving stolen goods

Description

Name: Luke Swailes Arrested for: not given Arrested at: North Shields Police Station Arrested on: 23 September 1906 Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-95-Luke Swailes An image of his accomplice, William Townsley, is available here www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27145451015/in/album-72157.... The Shields Daily News for 29 September 1906 reports: ?THEFT OF JEWELLERY AT NORTH SHIELDS. TWO MEN COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. This morning at the North Shields Police Court, before Captain J. Sanderson and Mr G.H. Stansfield, Luke Swailes (60), general dealer and Wm. Townsley, a young man, both of Gateshead, were charged with stealing, on the 27th of November 1905, from Welbury House, Preston Park, three bracelets, a neck chain, locket, ring and brooch, value £20, the property of Ethel Annie Freeth. Swailes was further charged with receiving from Wm. Townsley a gold expansion bracelet and watch value £6, the property of Alfred John Freeth, well knowing the same to have been stolen. Mr G W Chapman represented Swailes. Ethel Annie Freeth said that on Sunday, November 26th, she left her watch and bracelet in a drawer in the bedroom, together with the other articles mentioned in the charge. On the afternoon of the next day she missed them and gave information to the police. Elizabeth Irvin, dressmaker, 84 Grey Street, said that in November last she was employed at the Elms, Preston Park, which was next door to Freeth?s house. On the afternoon of the 27th, she saw a man prowling about in front of the sitting room window and took good notice of him. On January 30th, she identified him among six men at Gateshead Police Station and now identified him as the prisoner Townsley. Edward Surtees Chisholm, manager of the New Gateshead Inn, North Street, Gateshead, stated that he had known the prisoner Swailes for several years. He was a respectable general dealer. He came to witness?s house one Tuesday in November or December and offered him the watch bracelet for £2. The witness bought it for that sum which he thought was a fair price. Detective Radcliffe said he was present at the Gateshead Police Station when Miss Irvin identified Townsley. The prisoner said ?I can soon get out of that, I was in hospital at the time.? On Friday 21st, he arrested Swailes on a warrant. When witness read the warrant over to him he said, ?He (Townsley) must be a scoundrel. This is some more he has put on to me.? Later he said, ?I have only to say that Townsley is a thorough scoundrel. I am as innocent as a child unborn.? Witness showed him the watch bracelet and told him that that was what he was charged with receiving. He replied, ?I have never seen it before.? In the cell he said, ?I think the best thing in a case of this kind is to plead guilty. Chisholm knew as well as I did that I got it from Townsley. He asked me if it was straight and I told him he would not get it for £2 if it had been.? Neither of the prisoners, when charged this morning, had anything to say. The prisoner Swailes gave evidence on his own behalf. He said that he was 50 years of age and a general dealer and lived at 4 Towns Street, New Gateshead. About Christmas the accused Townsley came to him. Previous to that he did not know the man. Townsley asked him if he would buy a bracelet, as he wanted the money to go to Scotland. Asked where he had got it, he said he found it sometime since at Jesmond on a seat. He asked £2 for it, and witness telling him that all the money he had upon him was 35s, Townsley at once handed it over for that price. At Chisholm?s bar next day witness offered it for sale to him and he bought it for £2. Witness thought that would be about the value of the article and did not for one moment imagine it had been stolen. From what he was, however, told later he has very reason to think that the bracelet had been stolen. Afterwards from time to time witness advanced Townsley?s mother small sums of money. Eventually he stopped lending her money, whereupon she made a charge against him to the Gateshead Police. He was tried on that charge at Durham Assizes and acquitted. When charged last Friday week with the offence now being dealt with he did deny that he bought the bracelet from Townsley. He did this because he was afraid of getting Chisholm into trouble. Later he admitted that he had sold it. Cross-examined by the Chief Constable (Mr. J. H. Huish) Swailes admitted that when arrested he did not know that the bracelet was in the hands of the police. The prisoner Townsley reserved his defence. Both prisoners were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions. Townsley who was in charge of warders, was conveyed to Newcastle Gaol to await trial. Swailes was admitted to bail in his own recognisances of £50 and one surety of £50. Townsley is at present undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude for burglary at Hedgeley Heath and was brought before the magistrates on a Home Office order." The Shields Daily News for 19 October 1906 reports: ?William Townsley, 22, labourer, pleaded guilty to having stolen £20 worth of jewellery at Tynemouth on Nov. 27, 1905, the property of Miss Ethel Annie Freeth of Preston Park, North Shields. Luke Swailes, 59, dealer, pleaded not guilty to a charge of having received the jewellery, well knowing it to have been stolen. Mr Griffith Jones prosecuted and Mr Mundahl defended the accused Swailes. The jury found Swailes guilty and he was sentenced to three months? hard labour. Townsley, who is currently undergoing a sentence of three years? penal servitude at Stafford Prison, was sentenced to a similar term, to run concurrently with the sentence he is now serving?. These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne & Wear Archives (TWA ref DX1388/1). (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

Subjects

prisoner | crime | criminal | northshields | northtyneside | policestation | mugshot | hat | elderly | beard | edwardian | interesting | unusual | portrait | historic | receivingstolengoods | theft | stealing | larceny | generaldealer | gateshead | prestonpark | imprisoned | socialhistory | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthemen | man | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | facialhair | neutralbackground | blur | grain | mark | coat | crease | fabric | cloth | waistcoat | button | scarf | seated | arm | shoulder | attentive | ribbon | serious | lukeswailes | arrest | receiving | stolengoods | northshieldspolicestation | 23september1906 | accomplice | williamtownsley | theshieldsdailynews | 29september1906 | newspaperreport | jewellery | twomen | trial | northshieldspolicecourt | fascinating | courthearing | publicrecords | criminalrecord | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | moustache | wrinkle | eye | nose | mouth | face | sepia

License

No known copyright restrictions

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William Townsley, labourer, arrested for stealing jewellery

Description

Name: William Townsley Arrested for: not given Arrested at: North Shields Police Station Arrested on: not given Tyne and Wear Archives ref: DX1388-1-81-William Townsley This image of Townsley seems to have been supplied by the Gateshead Constabulary to the police at North Shields. An image of his accomplice, Luke Swailes is available here www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/27190318155/in/album-72157.... The Shields Daily News for 29 September 1906 reports: ?THEFT OF JEWELLERY AT NORTH SHIELDS. TWO MEN COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. This morning at the North Shields Police Court, before Captain J. Sanderson and Mr G.H. Stansfield, Luke Swailes (60), general dealer and Wm. Townsley, a young man, both of Gateshead, were charged with stealing, on the 27th of November 1905, from Welbury House, Preston Park, three bracelets, a neck chain, locket, ring and brooch, value £20, the property of Ethel Annie Freeth. Swailes was further charged with receiving from Wm. Townsley a gold expansion bracelet and watch value £6, the property of Alfred John Freeth, well knowing the same to have been stolen. Mr G W Chapman represented Swailes. Ethel Annie Freeth said that on Sunday, November 26th, she left her watch and bracelet in a drawer in the bedroom, together with the other articles mentioned in the charge. On the afternoon of the next day she missed them and gave information to the police. Elizabeth Irvin, dressmaker, 84 Grey Street, said that in November last she was employed at the Elms, Preston Park, which was next door to Freeth?s house. On the afternoon of the 27th, she saw a man prowling about in front of the sitting room window and took good notice of him. On January 30th, she identified him among six men at Gateshead Police Station and now identified him as the prisoner Townsley. Edward Surtees Chisholm, manager of the New Gateshead Inn, North Street, Gateshead, stated that he had known the prisoner Swailes for several years. He was a respectable general dealer. He came to witness?s house one Tuesday in November or December and offered him the watch bracelet for £2. The witness bought it for that sum which he thought was a fair price. Detective Radcliffe said he was present at the Gateshead Police Station when Miss Irvin identified Townsley. The prisoner said ?I can soon get out of that, I was in hospital at the time.? On Friday 21st, he arrested Swailes on a warrant. When witness read the warrant over to him he said, ?He (Townsley) must be a scoundrel. This is some more he has put on to me.? Later he said, ?I have only to say that Townsley is a thorough scoundrel. I am as innocent as a child unborn.? Witness showed him the watch bracelet and told him that that was what he was charged with receiving. He replied, ?I have never seen it before.? In the cell he said, ?I think the best thing in a case of this kind is to plead guilty. Chisholm knew as well as I did that I got it from Townsley. He asked me if it was straight and I told him he would not get it for £2 if it had been.? Neither of the prisoners, when charged this morning, had anything to say. The prisoner Swailes gave evidence on his own behalf. He said that he was 50 years of age and a general dealer and lived at 4 Towns Street, New Gateshead. About Christmas the accused Townsley came to him. Previous to that he did not know the man. Townsley asked him if he would buy a bracelet, as he wanted the money to go to Scotland. Asked where he had got it, he said he found it sometime since at Jesmond on a seat. He asked £2 for it, and witness telling him that all the money he had upon him was 35s, Townsley at once handed it over for that price. At Chisholm?s bar next day witness offered it for sale to him and he bought it for £2. Witness thought that would be about the value of the article and did not for one moment imagine it had been stolen. From what he was, however, told later he has very reason to think that the bracelet had been stolen. Afterwards from time to time witness advanced Townsley?s mother small sums of money. Eventually he stopped lending her money, whereupon she made a charge against him to the Gateshead Police. He was tried on that charge at Durham Assizes and acquitted. When charged last Friday week with the offence now being dealt with he did deny that he bought the bracelet from Townsley. He did this because he was afraid of getting Chisholm into trouble. Later he admitted that he had sold it. Cross-examined by the Chief Constable (Mr. J. H. Huish) Swailes admitted that when arrested he did not know that the bracelet was in the hands of the police. The prisoner Townsley reserved his defence. Both prisoners were committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions. Townsley who was in charge of warders, was conveyed to Newcastle Gaol to await trial. Swailes was admitted to bail in his own recognisances of £50 and one surety of £50. Townsley is at present undergoing a sentence of three years penal servitude for burglary at Hedgeley Heath and was brought before the magistrates on a Home Office order." The Shields Daily News for 19 October 1906 reports: ?William Townsley, 22, labourer, pleaded guilty to having stolen £20 worth of jewellery at Tynemouth on Nov. 27, 1905, the property of Miss Ethel Annie Freeth of Preston Park, North Shields. Luke Swailes, 59, dealer, pleaded not guilty to a charge of having received the jewellery, well knowing it to have been stolen. Mr Griffith Jones prosecuted and Mr Mundahl defended the accused Swailes. The jury found Swailes guilty and he was sentenced to three months? hard labour. Townsley, who is currently undergoing a sentence of three years? penal servitude at Stafford Prison, was sentenced to a similar term, to run concurrently with the sentence he is now serving?. These images are a selection from an album of photographs of prisoners brought before the North Shields Police Court between 1902 and 1916 in the collection of Tyne & Wear Archives (TWA ref DX1388/1). (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk.

Subjects

prisoner | crime | criminal | northshields | northtyneside | policestation | mugshot | cap | young | youth | edwardian | interesting | unusual | portrait | historic | theft | stealing | larceny | labourer | gateshead | prestonpark | imprisoned | socialhistory | criminalfacesofnorthshieldsthemen | man | male | face | jewellery | williamtownsley | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | grain | neutralbackground | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | northshieldspolicestation | gatesheadconstabulary | police | accomplice | lukeswailes | northshieldspolicecourt | theshieldsdailynews | 29september1906 | newspaperreport | courthearing | 27thofnovember1905 | surreal | scary | fascinating | welburyhouseprestonpark | ethelanniefreeth | alfredjohnfreeth | gatesheadpolicestation | elizabethirvin | detectiveradcliffe | arrest | warrant | acquitted | chiefconstablemrjhhuish | fine | bail | sentenced | threeyearspenalservitude | staffordprison | 190216 | blackoutline | mark | handwriting | stripes | suit | shirt | button | coat | pocket | attentive

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | eugenics | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial economy | human biodiversity | apartheid | race and gender | monogenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi racism | sociology of science | race and culture | genetic engineering | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Intracellular and Extracellular buffers Intracellular and Extracellular buffers

Description

This RLO outlines the main intracellular and extracellular buffering systems within the body and shows how trhe carbonic acid buffering system can be assessed This RLO outlines the main intracellular and extracellular buffering systems within the body and shows how trhe carbonic acid buffering system can be assessed

Subjects

ukoer | ukoer | Clinical skills | Clinical skills | Science basics | Science basics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT) 20.320 Biomolecular Kinetics and Cell Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This class covers analysis of kinetics and dynamics of molecular and cellular processes across a hierarchy of scales, including intracellular, extracellular, and cell population levels; a spectrum of biotechnology applications are also taken into consideration. Topics include gene regulation networks; nucleic acid hybridization; signal transduction pathways; and cell populations in tissues and bioreactors. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling | cell population scale | cell population scale

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ray Wagner Collection Image Ray Wagner Collection Image

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Subjects

airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | aviation | aviation | hughes | hughes | prattwhitney | prattwhitney | airracer | airracer | airracing | airracing | hughesaircraft | hughesaircraft | hughesh1 | hughesh1 | h1racer | h1racer | twinwaspjunior | twinwaspjunior | r1535 | r1535 | r258y | r258y | hughesracer | hughesracer | hughesh1racer | hughesh1racer | nr258y | nr258y | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535 | prattwhitneyr1535 | pwr1535 | pwr1535

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airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | aviation | aviation | hughes | hughes | prattwhitney | prattwhitney | airracer | airracer | airracing | airracing | hughesaircraft | hughesaircraft | hughesh1 | hughesh1 | h1racer | h1racer | twinwaspjunior | twinwaspjunior | r1535 | r1535 | r258y | r258y | hughesracer | hughesracer | hughesh1racer | hughesh1racer | nr258y | nr258y | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535 | prattwhitneyr1535 | pwr1535 | pwr1535

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Ray Wagner Collection Image Ray Wagner Collection Image

Description

Subjects

airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | aviation | aviation | hughes | hughes | prattwhitney | prattwhitney | airracer | airracer | airracing | airracing | hughesaircraft | hughesaircraft | hughesh1 | hughesh1 | h1racer | h1racer | twinwaspjunior | twinwaspjunior | r1535 | r1535 | r258y | r258y | hughesracer | hughesracer | hughesh1racer | hughesh1racer | nr258y | nr258y | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535twinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneytwinwaspjunior | prattwhitneyr1535 | prattwhitneyr1535 | pwr1535 | pwr1535

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24.236 Topics in Social Theory and Practice: Race and Racism (MIT) 24.236 Topics in Social Theory and Practice: Race and Racism (MIT)

Description

Courses in the Topics in Social Theory and Practice series feature in-depth considerations of such topics with reflections on their implications for social change.The topic for Fall 2014 is race and racism. We will consider a variety of arguments for and against the biological and / or social "reality" of race—taking into account purported races other than those defined by the black / white binary and the intersection of race with other social categories. We will then consider a number of accounts of racism, contemporary manifestations of racism, and potential counter-measures. Courses in the Topics in Social Theory and Practice series feature in-depth considerations of such topics with reflections on their implications for social change.The topic for Fall 2014 is race and racism. We will consider a variety of arguments for and against the biological and / or social "reality" of race—taking into account purported races other than those defined by the black / white binary and the intersection of race with other social categories. We will then consider a number of accounts of racism, contemporary manifestations of racism, and potential counter-measures.

Subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Intracellular transport Intracellular transport

Description

This free course, Intracellular transport, explains the function of the cytoskeleton and its role in controlling transport of vesicles between different subcellular compartments. First published on Wed, 02 Mar 2016 as Intracellular transport. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Intracellular transport, explains the function of the cytoskeleton and its role in controlling transport of vesicles between different subcellular compartments. First published on Wed, 02 Mar 2016 as Intracellular transport. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 02 Mar 2016 as Intracellular transport. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Wed, 02 Mar 2016 as Intracellular transport. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Biology | Biology | cytoskeleton | cytoskeleton | cellular | cellular | vesicles | vesicles | subcellular | subcellular | S377_3 | S377_3

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21W.742 Writing About Race (MIT) 21W.742 Writing About Race (MIT)

Description

Does race still matter, as Cornel West proclaimed in his 1994 book of that title, or do we now live, as others maintain, in a post-racial society? The very notion of what constitutes race remains a complex and evolving question in cultural terms. In this course we will engage this question head-on, reading and writing about issues involving the construction of race and racial identity as reflected from a number of vantage points and via a rich array of voices and genres. Readings will include literary works by such writers as Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, and Sherman Alexie, as well as perspectives on film and popular culture from figures such as Malcolm Gladwell and Touré. Does race still matter, as Cornel West proclaimed in his 1994 book of that title, or do we now live, as others maintain, in a post-racial society? The very notion of what constitutes race remains a complex and evolving question in cultural terms. In this course we will engage this question head-on, reading and writing about issues involving the construction of race and racial identity as reflected from a number of vantage points and via a rich array of voices and genres. Readings will include literary works by such writers as Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, and Sherman Alexie, as well as perspectives on film and popular culture from figures such as Malcolm Gladwell and Touré.

Subjects

race | race | gender | gender | latino | latino | black | black | african american | african american | post-racism | post-racism | racism | racism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.742J Writing About Race (MIT) 21W.742J Writing About Race (MIT)

Description

In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "…the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing to explore how the fictions and facts of race condition all our lives, social and civic, private and public. We will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the givens of history by In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "…the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing to explore how the fictions and facts of race condition all our lives, social and civic, private and public. We will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the givens of history by

Subjects

writing race | writing race | Sandra Cisneros | Sandra Cisneros | Louise Erdrich | Louise Erdrich | William Faulkner | William Faulkner | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Judson Mitcham | Judson Mitcham | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison | WMN.575J | WMN.575J | 21W.742 | 21W.742 | SP.575 | SP.575 | WMN.575 | WMN.575

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CF_06 53 NAR Cleveland 1937 CF_06 53 NAR Cleveland 1937

Description

Subjects

panorama | panorama | 1937clevelandairraces | 1937clevelandairraces | clevelandairraces | clevelandairraces | airracing | airracing | 1937nationalairraces | 1937nationalairraces | nationalairraces | nationalairraces | kcle | kcle | cle | cle | cleveland | cleveland

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CF_06 52 NAR Cleveland 1937 CF_06 52 NAR Cleveland 1937

Description

Subjects

1937clevelandairraces | 1937clevelandairraces | clevelandairraces | clevelandairraces | airracing | airracing | automobile | automobile | grandstand | grandstand | panorama | panorama | 1937nationalairraces | 1937nationalairraces | nationalairraces | nationalairraces | kcle | kcle | cle | cle | cleveland | cleveland

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11.237 Gender and Race, Work, and Public Policy (MIT) 11.237 Gender and Race, Work, and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course provides an analytic framework for understanding the roles that gender and race play in defining the work worlds of women and men in our society, including ways in which gender intersects with race and class. The course examines specific workplace-related policies through a gender/race lens, including welfare policy, comparable worth, affirmative action, parental leave policy, child care policy and working time policies. Students are required to investigate ways in which these policies address gender and racial inequities, and think critically about mechanisms for change. This course provides an analytic framework for understanding the roles that gender and race play in defining the work worlds of women and men in our society, including ways in which gender intersects with race and class. The course examines specific workplace-related policies through a gender/race lens, including welfare policy, comparable worth, affirmative action, parental leave policy, child care policy and working time policies. Students are required to investigate ways in which these policies address gender and racial inequities, and think critically about mechanisms for change.

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | work | work | equity | equity | child care | child care | education | education | affirmative action | affirmative action | public policy | public policy | family | family | class | class | poverty | poverty | government | government | structural inequity | structural inequity | labor | labor | economics | economics | market | market | workplace | workplace | comparable worth | comparable worth | politics | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Subjects

Philosophy | race | natural kinds | classification | Appiah | naming | genomics | marriage | intermarriage | history of science | DNA | eugenics | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.742J Writing About Race (MIT)

Description

In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "...the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing to explore how the fictions and facts of race condition all our lives, social and civic, private and public. We will consider the complex question of racial identity, test the givens of history by uncovering histories that have bee

Subjects

race | writing | multiracial | multi-race | mixed-race | multiraciality | multiple descent | hybrid populations | mixed ancestry | assimilation | integration | ethnicity | identity | self | heritage | multicultural | mixed heritage | mulato | mestizo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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