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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory. What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | popular reading | highbrow culture | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | gender | taste | taste | theory and practice of reading | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fanfiction | fandom | fandom | Oprah | Oprah | comics | comics | hypertext | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | reader response theory | Harry Potter | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | sociology and history of reading | resistance | resistance | rare books | rare books | fads | fads | social engineering | social engineering | bestseller | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response. Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | novel | short story | short story | the city in literature | the city in literature | structure | structure | narrative voice | narrative voice | character development | character development | novelistic experimentation | novelistic experimentation | historical context | historical context | political context | political context | reader response | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How to be a critical reader How to be a critical reader

Description

In this free course you will focus on how to be a critical reader. Reading critically is an essential skill at university. It means being aware of your own purposes and opinions as you read and being able to recognise the writer's purposes and opinions in their writing. First published on Thu, 11 Dec 2014 as How to be a critical reader. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 In this free course you will focus on how to be a critical reader. Reading critically is an essential skill at university. It means being aware of your own purposes and opinions as you read and being able to recognise the writer's purposes and opinions in their writing. First published on Thu, 11 Dec 2014 as How to be a critical reader. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

English Language | English Language | English | English | studying | studying | online | online | facts | facts | evidence | evidence | vocabulary | vocabulary

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The use of citizen journalism by traditional media The use of citizen journalism by traditional media

Description

Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks Seminar delivered by Nic Newman, former Future Media Controller, BBC and visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Nicola Bruno writes: 'To be social or not to be social?' According to Nic Newman, RISJ Visiting Fellow and a digital media consultant, that is no longer the question for mainstream media outlets facing the transition to the digital landscape. During his seminar at the RISJ on 'The use of citizen journalism by traditional media', Nic Newman explained to the audience that in the last two years all media organizations have embraced user-generated and social media tools. After watching with suspicion (and sometimes also with haughtiness) the rise of citizen journalism, mainstream media outlets have become more and more aware that digital networks

Subjects

traditional | traditional | mainstream | mainstream | readers | readers | media | media | social | social | journalism | journalism | newman | newman | digital | digital | citizen | citizen | content | content | tools | tools | networks | networks | people | people | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20 | traditional | mainstream | readers | media | social | journalism | newman | digital | citizen | content | tools | networks | people | 2010-10-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The meridian sun of liberty; or, the whole rights of man displayed and most accurately defined, in a lecture read at the Philosophical Society in Newcastle, on the 8th of November, 1775, ... To which is now first prefixed, by way of preface, a most important dialogue between the citizen reader, and the author. By T. Spence The meridian sun of liberty; or, the whole rights of man displayed and most accurately defined, in a lecture read at the Philosophical Society in Newcastle, on the 8th of November, 1775, ... To which is now first prefixed, by way of preface, a most important dialogue between the citizen reader, and the author. By T. Spence

Description

ebook version of The meridian sun of liberty; or, the whole rights of man displayed and most accurately defined, in a lecture read at the Philosophical Society in Newcastle, on the 8th of November, 1775, ... To which is now first prefixed, by way of preface, a most important dialogue between the citizen reader, and the author. By T. Spence ebook version of The meridian sun of liberty; or, the whole rights of man displayed and most accurately defined, in a lecture read at the Philosophical Society in Newcastle, on the 8th of November, 1775, ... To which is now first prefixed, by way of preface, a most important dialogue between the citizen reader, and the author. By T. Spence

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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An account of the proceedings against the rebels, and other prisoners, tried before the Lord Chief Justice Jefferies: and other judges in the west of England, in 1685. for taking arms under the Duke of Monmouth. ... To which is prefix'd, the Duke of Monmouth's, the Earl of Argyle's, and the Pretender's declarations, that the reader may the better judge of the cause of the several rebellions. An account of the proceedings against the rebels, and other prisoners, tried before the Lord Chief Justice Jefferies: and other judges in the west of England, in 1685. for taking arms under the Duke of Monmouth. ... To which is prefix'd, the Duke of Monmouth's, the Earl of Argyle's, and the Pretender's declarations, that the reader may the better judge of the cause of the several rebellions.

Description

ebook version of An account of the proceedings against the rebels, and other prisoners, tried before the Lord Chief Justice Jefferies: and other judges in the west of England, in 1685. for taking arms under the Duke of Monmouth. ... To which is prefix'd, the Duke of Monmouth's, the Earl of Argyle's, and the Pretender's declarations, that the reader may the better judge of the cause of the several rebellions. ebook version of An account of the proceedings against the rebels, and other prisoners, tried before the Lord Chief Justice Jefferies: and other judges in the west of England, in 1685. for taking arms under the Duke of Monmouth. ... To which is prefix'd, the Duke of Monmouth's, the Earl of Argyle's, and the Pretender's declarations, that the reader may the better judge of the cause of the several rebellions.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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Remarks on the opinions of some of the most celebrated writers on Crown Law: respecting the due distinction between manslaughter and murder: ... With a prefatory address to the reader, ... By Granville Sharp. Remarks on the opinions of some of the most celebrated writers on Crown Law: respecting the due distinction between manslaughter and murder: ... With a prefatory address to the reader, ... By Granville Sharp.

Description

ebook version of Remarks on the opinions of some of the most celebrated writers on Crown Law: respecting the due distinction between manslaughter and murder: ... With a prefatory address to the reader, ... By Granville Sharp. ebook version of Remarks on the opinions of some of the most celebrated writers on Crown Law: respecting the due distinction between manslaughter and murder: ... With a prefatory address to the reader, ... By Granville Sharp.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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The progress of wit: a caveat. For the use of an eminent writer. By a fellow of All-Souls. To which is prefix'd, an explanatory discourse to the reader. By Gamaliel Gunson, ... The progress of wit: a caveat. For the use of an eminent writer. By a fellow of All-Souls. To which is prefix'd, an explanatory discourse to the reader. By Gamaliel Gunson, ...

Description

ebook version of The progress of wit: a caveat. For the use of an eminent writer. By a fellow of All-Souls. To which is prefix'd, an explanatory discourse to the reader. By Gamaliel Gunson, ... ebook version of The progress of wit: a caveat. For the use of an eminent writer. By a fellow of All-Souls. To which is prefix'd, an explanatory discourse to the reader. By Gamaliel Gunson, ...

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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15.062 Data Mining (MIT) 15.062 Data Mining (MIT)

Description

Data that has relevance for managerial decisions is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and intelligent machines. Such data is often stored in data warehouses and data marts specifically intended for management decision support. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist managers to make intelligent use of these repositories. A number of successful applications have been reported in areas such as credit rating, fraud detection, database marketing, customer relationship management, and stock market investments. The f Data that has relevance for managerial decisions is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and intelligent machines. Such data is often stored in data warehouses and data marts specifically intended for management decision support. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist managers to make intelligent use of these repositories. A number of successful applications have been reported in areas such as credit rating, fraud detection, database marketing, customer relationship management, and stock market investments. The f

Subjects

data warehouses | data warehouses | internet | internet | e-commerce | e-commerce | electronic banking | electronic banking | point-of-sale devices | point-of-sale devices | bar-code readers | bar-code readers | intelligent machines | intelligent machines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT) 21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy). Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | writing | creative writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction | fiction writing | fiction writing | writing fiction | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre fiction | genre | genre | genres | genres | fantasy | fantasy | fantasy writing | fantasy writing | science fiction | science fiction | mystery | mystery | historical fiction | historical fiction | preternatural romance | preternatural romance | horror | horror | steampunk | steampunk | workshop | workshop | revision | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Character reader and Clairvoyant

Description

This image shows a lady sat outside her caravan, she's part of a travelling show. The chalk boards beside her van say 'Real Gypsy, character reader and clairvoyant' and 'World's Wonder' Accession: 944/2955 The images have been selected from the Arthur J Fenwick collection of circus material. Arthur James Fenwick (1878-1957) was a director of Fenwick's Department Store. In his personal life he was extremely interested in fairs and circuses, collecting historical material about them and building personal relationships with showmen who visited Newcastle. He was made a life member of the Showmen's Guild in 1944. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk. To purchase a hi-res copy please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk quoting the title and reference number.

Subjects

caravan | traveller | travellingshow | viintagecaravan | clairvoyant | characterreader | palmreader | archivephotograph | mobilehome | motorhome | documentaryphotography | camper | fenwicks | fair | fairground

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | taste | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fandom | Oprah | comics | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | resistance | rare books | fads | social engineering | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | short story | the city in literature | structure | narrative voice | character development | novelistic experimentation | historical context | political context | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT) 21W.755 Writing and Reading Short Stories (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of the short story, which we will explore through reading great short stories, writers speaking about writing, writing exercises and conducting workshops on original stories. This class will focus on the craft of the short story, which we will explore through reading great short stories, writers speaking about writing, writing exercises and conducting workshops on original stories.

Subjects

short story | short story | voice | voice | point of view | point of view | character | character | place | place | plot | plot | pace | pace | conflict | conflict | want | want | obstacle | obstacle | writer's block | writer's block | workshop | workshop | incident | incident | description | description | publishing | publishing | revelation | revelation | reader | reader | writer | writer | free writing | free writing | rewrite | rewrite

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT) 13.024 Numerical Marine Hydrodynamics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™ This course is an introduction to numerical methods: interpolation, differentiation, integration, and systems of linear equations. It covers the solution of differential equations by numerical integration, as well as partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics: finite difference methods, boundary integral equation panel methods. Also addressed are introductory numerical lifting surface computations, fast Fourier transforms, the numerical representation of deterministic and random sea waves, as well as integral boundary layer equations and numerical solutions.Technical RequirementMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. The .FIN and .OUT are simply data offest tables. They can be viewed with any text reader. RealOne™

Subjects

numerical methods | numerical methods | interpolation | interpolation | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration | systems of linear equations | systems of linear equations | differential equations | differential equations | numerical integration | numerical integration | partial differential | partial differential | boundary integral equation panel methods | boundary integral equation panel methods | deterministic and random sea waves | deterministic and random sea waves | Fast Fourier Transforms | Fast Fourier Transforms | finite difference methods | finite difference methods | Integral boundary layer equations | Integral boundary layer equations | numerical lifting surface computations | numerical lifting surface computations | Numerical representation | Numerical representation | numerical solutions | numerical solutions | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | partial differential equations of inviscid hydrodynamics | incompressible fluid mechanics | incompressible fluid mechanics | calculus | calculus | complex numbers | complex numbers | root finding | root finding | curve fitting | curve fitting | numerical differentiation | numerical differentiation | numerical errors | numerical errors | panel methods | panel methods | oscillating rigid objects | oscillating rigid objects | 2.29 | 2.29

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.418 Technologies of Word 1450-2000 (MIT) 21H.418 Technologies of Word 1450-2000 (MIT)

Description

There has been much discussion in recent years, on this campus and elsewhere, about the death of the book. Digitization and various forms of electronic media, some critics say, are rendering the printed text as obsolete as the writing quill. In this subject we will examine the claims for and against the demise of the book, but we also supplement these arguments with an historical perspective they lack: we examine books and printing technology during the Early Modern period of European history, from roughly 1450 to 1800. We will begin with the theoretical and historical overviews of Walter Ong and Elizabeth Eisenstein, after which we will study specific cases such as the writings and readers of Erasmus and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, English chapbooks, and stage plays in print. Finally, we will There has been much discussion in recent years, on this campus and elsewhere, about the death of the book. Digitization and various forms of electronic media, some critics say, are rendering the printed text as obsolete as the writing quill. In this subject we will examine the claims for and against the demise of the book, but we also supplement these arguments with an historical perspective they lack: we examine books and printing technology during the Early Modern period of European history, from roughly 1450 to 1800. We will begin with the theoretical and historical overviews of Walter Ong and Elizabeth Eisenstein, after which we will study specific cases such as the writings and readers of Erasmus and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, English chapbooks, and stage plays in print. Finally, we will

Subjects

publishing | publishing | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | printing | printing | Walter Ong | Walter Ong | Elizabeth Eisenstein | Elizabeth Eisenstein | Erasmus | Jean-Jacques Rousseau | Erasmus | Jean-Jacques Rousseau | Erasmus | Erasmus | Jean-Jacques Rousseau | Jean-Jacques Rousseau | English chapbooks | English chapbooks | stage plays | stage plays

License

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RES.6-005 Understanding Lasers and Fiberoptics (MIT) RES.6-005 Understanding Lasers and Fiberoptics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Lasers are essential to an incredibly large number of applications. Today, they are used in bar code readers, compact discs, medicine, communications, sensors, materials processing, computer printers, data processing, 3D-imaging, spectroscopy, navigation, non-destructive testing, chemical processing, color copiers, laser "shows", and in the military. There is hardly a field untouched by the laser. But what exactly is so unique about lasers that makes them so effective? This brief video course is designed for engineers, scientists, medical personnel, managers, and others who work with lasers and/or fiberoptics, or who anticipate working with lasers and/or fiberoptics, yet have little or no background in laser or fiberoptic basics. The cou Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Lasers are essential to an incredibly large number of applications. Today, they are used in bar code readers, compact discs, medicine, communications, sensors, materials processing, computer printers, data processing, 3D-imaging, spectroscopy, navigation, non-destructive testing, chemical processing, color copiers, laser "shows", and in the military. There is hardly a field untouched by the laser. But what exactly is so unique about lasers that makes them so effective? This brief video course is designed for engineers, scientists, medical personnel, managers, and others who work with lasers and/or fiberoptics, or who anticipate working with lasers and/or fiberoptics, yet have little or no background in laser or fiberoptic basics. The cou

Subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.501 Introduction to Financial and Managerial Accounting (MIT) 15.501 Introduction to Financial and Managerial Accounting (MIT)

Description

This course studies basic concepts of financial and managerial reporting. The viewpoint is that of readers of financial and managerial reports rather than the accountants who prepare them. This course studies basic concepts of financial and managerial reporting. The viewpoint is that of readers of financial and managerial reports rather than the accountants who prepare them.

Subjects

financial and managerial reporting | financial and managerial reporting | basic accounting | basic accounting | basic concepts of financial reporting | basic concepts of financial reporting | exchange of resources | exchange of resources

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin. This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin.

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | Austen | Austen | Dickens | Dickens | Conrad | Conrad | Woolfe | Woolfe | Charters | Charters | literature | literature | novel | novel | narrative | narrative | verbal text | verbal text | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel (MIT)

Description

This course explores the metaphorical, historical, social, and psychological value of ghosts in the American novel. Using the theme of "haunting" as a flashpoint for class discussion and a thematic center for our readerly attention, this course examines the American novel in the context of the various histories which might be said to haunt fictional characters in the American novel, to haunt the American novel itself, and ultimately to haunt us: America's colonial past, its slave past, and other memorable and painful chapters in its past. This course explores the metaphorical, historical, social, and psychological value of ghosts in the American novel. Using the theme of "haunting" as a flashpoint for class discussion and a thematic center for our readerly attention, this course examines the American novel in the context of the various histories which might be said to haunt fictional characters in the American novel, to haunt the American novel itself, and ultimately to haunt us: America's colonial past, its slave past, and other memorable and painful chapters in its past.

Subjects

nathaniel hawthorne | nathaniel hawthorne | harriet beecher stowe | harriet beecher stowe | henry james | henry james | william Faulkner | william Faulkner | maxine hong Kingston | maxine hong Kingston | cormac mccarthy | cormac mccarthy | toni Morrison | toni Morrison | louise erdrich | louise erdrich | philip roth | philip roth | edward p. jones | edward p. jones

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT)

Description

Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro

Subjects

poems | poems | think | think | images | images | poet | poet | lunatic | lunatic | irrational | irrational | art | art | sciences | sciences | processes of mind | processes of mind | reason | reason | mind | mind | thought | thought | British | British | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth | nineteenth | centuries | centuries | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | brain | brain | interdisciplinary course | interdisciplinary course | lyric | lyric | didactic | didactic | cognition | cognition | medicine | medicine | literary study | literary study | humanistic research | humanistic research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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