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Readme file for Web Design and Objects

Description

This readme file contains details of links to all the Web Design and Objects module's material held on Jorum and information about the module as well.

Subjects

ukoer | data oriented dynamic design methods article | data oriented dynamic design methods reading material | data oriented dynamic design methods | data oriented dynamic web design method article | data oriented dynamic web design method reading material | data oriented dynamic web design method | design method article | design method lecture | design method reading material | design method | design methods article | design methods lecture | design methods reading material | design methods | dynamic design method article | dynamic design method lecture | dynamic design methods reading material | dynamic design methods | hypermedia design methods reading material | hypermedia design reading material | hypermedia systems reading material | hypertext application types reading material | live projects reading material | modelling framework reading material | object oriented dynamic design methods and consensus | object oriented dynamic web design method lecture | object oriented dynamic web design method reading material | object oriented dynamic web design method | process/event oriented dynamic design methods lecture | process/event oriented dynamic design methods | robustness diagrams reading material | simple web method website | static web method reading material | static web method task guide | static web method website | static web method | static web methods reading material | static web methods task guide | static web methods website | static web methods | structured detail website | structured overview lecture | structured techniques external website | structured techniques lecture | structured techniques reading material | structured techniques | swm analysis website | swm design detail | systems analysis and design practical | systems analysis and design reading material | systems analysis and design task guide | systems analysis and design website | systems analysis and design | systems analysis reading material | systems analysis task guide | uml lecture | uml reading material | web article | web design and objects article | web design and objects external website | web design and objects introduction lecture | web design and objects introduction reading material | web design and objects introduction task guide | web design and objects introduction website | web design and objects introduction | web design and objects lecture | web design and objects reading material | web design and objects task guide | web design and objects website | web design and objects | web design article | web design external website | web design lecture | web design practical | web design reading material | web design task guide | web design website | web design | web engineering reading material | web external website | web lecture | web method reading material | web method task guide | web method website | web method | web methods reading material | web methods task guide | web methods website | web methods | web object article | web object external website | web object lecture | web object practical | web object reading material | web object task guide | web object website | web object | web objects article | web objects external website | web objects lecture | web objects practical | web objects reading material | web objects task guide | web objects website | web objects | web practical | web reading material | web task guide | web website | web | webml lecture | webml reading material | webml website | webratio website | g530 article | g530 external website | g530 lecture | g530 practical | g530 reading material | g530 task guide | g530 website | g530 | web design and objects practical | web modeling language external website | web modeling language lecture | web modeling language reading material | web modeling language | web modelling language external website | web modelling language lecture | web modelling language reading material | web modelling language | webml external website | webml | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.304J Site and Infrastructure Systems Planning (MIT) 11.304J Site and Infrastructure Systems Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is a client-based land analysis and site planning project. The primary focus of the course changes from year to year. This year the focus is on Japan's New Towns. Students will review land inventory, analysis, and planning of sites and the infrastructure systems that serve them. They will also examine spatial organization of uses, parcelization, design of roadways, grading, utility systems, stormwater runoff, parking, traffic and off-site impacts, as well as landscaping. Lectures will cover analytical techniques and examples of good site-planning practice. Requirements include a series of assignments and a client-based project. This course is a client-based land analysis and site planning project. The primary focus of the course changes from year to year. This year the focus is on Japan's New Towns. Students will review land inventory, analysis, and planning of sites and the infrastructure systems that serve them. They will also examine spatial organization of uses, parcelization, design of roadways, grading, utility systems, stormwater runoff, parking, traffic and off-site impacts, as well as landscaping. Lectures will cover analytical techniques and examples of good site-planning practice. Requirements include a series of assignments and a client-based project.

Subjects

site planning | site planning | tama new town | tama new town | japan | japan | site analysis | site analysis | grading principles | grading principles | landscape planning | landscape planning | site inventory and evaluation | site inventory and evaluation | earthwork | earthwork | soils | soils | hydrology | hydrology | storm water | storm water | drainage basins | drainage basins | wetlands | wetlands | water features | water features | development layout | development layout | topography | topography | land use standard | land use standard | streets | streets | planning studio | planning studio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Teachers sharing resources online Teachers sharing resources online

Description

This free course, Teachers sharing resources online, is designed to help you learn about how learning resources can be shared using online repositories, i.e. websites that allow for the uploading of electronic materials that can then be used and adapted by others. One of the leading examples of such websites is TES Connect. While the course draws its examples and activities from this site its principles are designed so that they may be applied to others. First published on Mon, 03 Nov 2014 as Teachers sharing resources online. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 This free course, Teachers sharing resources online, is designed to help you learn about how learning resources can be shared using online repositories, i.e. websites that allow for the uploading of electronic materials that can then be used and adapted by others. One of the leading examples of such websites is TES Connect. While the course draws its examples and activities from this site its principles are designed so that they may be applied to others. First published on Mon, 03 Nov 2014 as Teachers sharing resources online. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Mon, 03 Nov 2014 as Teachers sharing resources online. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014 First published on Mon, 03 Nov 2014 as Teachers sharing resources online. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2014

Subjects

Education | Education | Professional Development in Education | Professional Development in Education | Teacher Training | Teacher Training | teaching | teaching | education | education | schools | schools | resources | resources | OERs | OERs | TES_1 | TES_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT) 11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT)

Description

There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites. There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites.

Subjects

brownfields | brownfields | environmental policy | environmental policy | environmental practice | environmental practice | planning | planning | urban redevelopment | urban redevelopment | market forces | market forces | law and liability | law and liability | environmental justice | environmental justice | under-served communities | under-served communities | environmental technology | environmental technology | risk assessment | risk assessment | economics | economics | risk management | risk management | community development corporations | community development corporations | politics | politics | Lynn | MA | Lynn | MA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.304J Site and Urban Systems Planning (MIT) 11.304J Site and Urban Systems Planning (MIT)

Description

The Site and Urban Systems Planning course provides a unique opportunity to engage in the exploration, utilization and critical assessment of new multi-layered manipulative simulation interfaces. Developed by the Tangible Media Group at the Media Lab, these platforms combine and update digital and tangible data in ways that promise to enhance design and planning processes and communication with the public. By testing and applying these platforms, as well as traditional methods, we will be able to learn various approaches involved in evaluating and planning sites.These approaches include:Understanding spatial as well as temporal relationships between individual site factors and local or regional context.Identifying basic relationships between natural and cultural processes and how they infl The Site and Urban Systems Planning course provides a unique opportunity to engage in the exploration, utilization and critical assessment of new multi-layered manipulative simulation interfaces. Developed by the Tangible Media Group at the Media Lab, these platforms combine and update digital and tangible data in ways that promise to enhance design and planning processes and communication with the public. By testing and applying these platforms, as well as traditional methods, we will be able to learn various approaches involved in evaluating and planning sites.These approaches include:Understanding spatial as well as temporal relationships between individual site factors and local or regional context.Identifying basic relationships between natural and cultural processes and how they infl

Subjects

site planning | site planning | natural systems | natural systems | digital planning | digital planning | site analysis | site analysis | evaluation and selection | evaluation and selection | spatial organization and programming | spatial organization and programming | analysis of surface runoff | analysis of surface runoff | utility systems | utility systems | design of circulation | design of circulation | parking and subdivision patterns | parking and subdivision patterns | street layouts | street layouts | 11.304 | 11.304

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.364 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (MIT) 1.364 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (MIT)

Description

1.364 examines site characterization and geotechnical aspects of the design and construction of foundation systems. Topics include: site investigation (with emphasis on in situ testing), shallow (footings and raftings) and deep (piles and caissons) foundations, excavation support systems, groundwater control, slope stability, soil improvement (compaction, soil reinforcement, etc.), and construction monitoring. This course is a core requirement for the Geotechnical Master of Engineering program at MIT. 1.364 examines site characterization and geotechnical aspects of the design and construction of foundation systems. Topics include: site investigation (with emphasis on in situ testing), shallow (footings and raftings) and deep (piles and caissons) foundations, excavation support systems, groundwater control, slope stability, soil improvement (compaction, soil reinforcement, etc.), and construction monitoring. This course is a core requirement for the Geotechnical Master of Engineering program at MIT.

Subjects

geotechnical engineering | geotechnical engineering | soil | soil | soil mechanics | soil mechanics | foundations | foundations | earth retaining structures | earth retaining structures | site investigation | site investigation | ultimate limit | ultimate limit | serviceability limit | serviceability limit | soil improvement | soil improvement | gravity walls | gravity walls | composite construction | composite construction | reinforced earth | reinforced earth | structural support | structural support | excavations | excavations | bracing | bracing | tieback anchors | tieback anchors | tiebacks | tiebacks | safety factors | safety factors | boreholes | boreholes | soil sampling | soil sampling | stratigraphy | stratigraphy | SPT | SPT | FV | FV | PCPT | PCPT | spread foundation design | spread foundation design | in situ tests | in situ tests | bearing capacity | bearing capacity | strength parameters | strength parameters | allowable settlements | allowable settlements | sand | sand | clay | clay | soil-structure interaction | soil-structure interaction | pile types | pile types | pile selection | pile selection | pile behavior | pile behavior | pile capacity | pile capacity | pile driving | pile driving | pile load tests | pile load tests | slope stability | slope stability | cantilevers | cantilevers | propper walls | propper walls | braced excavations | braced excavations | reinforced soil | reinforced soil | soil nailing | soil nailing | geosynthetic reinforcement | geosynthetic reinforcement

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.34 Waste Containment and Remediation Technology (MIT) 1.34 Waste Containment and Remediation Technology (MIT)

Description

1.34 focuses on the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, with specific emphasis on the design of land-based waste containment structures and hazardous waste remediation. Topics include: introduction to hazardous waste, definition of hazardous waste, regulatory requirements, waste characteristics, geo-chemistry, and contaminant transport; the design and operation of waste containment structures, landfills, impoundments, and mine-waste disposal; the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites, the superfund law, preliminary site assessment, site investigation techniques, and remediation technologies; and monitoring requirements. 1.34 focuses on the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, with specific emphasis on the design of land-based waste containment structures and hazardous waste remediation. Topics include: introduction to hazardous waste, definition of hazardous waste, regulatory requirements, waste characteristics, geo-chemistry, and contaminant transport; the design and operation of waste containment structures, landfills, impoundments, and mine-waste disposal; the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites, the superfund law, preliminary site assessment, site investigation techniques, and remediation technologies; and monitoring requirements.

Subjects

waste containment | waste containment | waste remediation | waste remediation | soil remediation | soil remediation | groundwater remediation | groundwater remediation | contaminated site | contaminated site | contamination | contamination | waste disposal | waste disposal | mass transport | mass transport | Superfund | Superfund | EPA | EPA | USGS | USGS | air sparging | air sparging | air stripper | air stripper | bioremediation | bioremediation | soil vapor extraction | soil vapor extraction | SVE | SVE | pump and treat | pump and treat | landfill | landfill | leachate | leachate | chlorinated solvent | chlorinated solvent | NAPL | NAPL | LNAPL | LNAPL | DNAPL | DNAPL | TCE | TCE | PCE | PCE | risk assessment | risk assessment | soil liner | soil liner | clay liner | clay liner | geomembrane | geomembrane | brownfield | brownfield | remediation technologies | remediation technologies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Living with the Internet: Online shopping Living with the Internet: Online shopping

Description

Online shopping think of it as a shopping centre in cyberspace, with online auctions as the car-boot sale in the car park. This free course, Living with the Internet: Online shopping, will help you understand how to use online shopping sites, how to ensure that you are using the best sites and the best ways to protect your security. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the Internet: Online shopping. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Online shopping think of it as a shopping centre in cyberspace, with online auctions as the car-boot sale in the car park. This free course, Living with the Internet: Online shopping, will help you understand how to use online shopping sites, how to ensure that you are using the best sites and the best ways to protect your security. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the Internet: Online shopping. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the Internet: Online shopping. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as Living with the Internet: Online shopping. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Information and Communication Technologies | Information and Communication Technologies | internet | internet | shopping | shopping

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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Thinking about dyslexia Thinking about dyslexia

Description

The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr

Subjects

UNow | UNow | dyslexia | dyslexia | PESL | PESL | develop practice | develop practice | HEFCE Disability Funding | HEFCE Disability Funding | good practice | good practice | best practice | best practice | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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11.304J Site and Infrastructure Systems Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is a client-based land analysis and site planning project. The primary focus of the course changes from year to year. This year the focus is on Japan's New Towns. Students will review land inventory, analysis, and planning of sites and the infrastructure systems that serve them. They will also examine spatial organization of uses, parcelization, design of roadways, grading, utility systems, stormwater runoff, parking, traffic and off-site impacts, as well as landscaping. Lectures will cover analytical techniques and examples of good site-planning practice. Requirements include a series of assignments and a client-based project.

Subjects

site planning | tama new town | japan | site analysis | grading principles | landscape planning | site inventory and evaluation | earthwork | soils | hydrology | storm water | drainage basins | wetlands | water features | development layout | topography | land use standard | streets | planning studio

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 1402: Aluminium Matrix Composite Materials

Description

This lecture provides understanding of the state-of-the-art of aluminium matrix composite materials; it outlines the properties of aluminium matrix composite materials as a basis for materials selection; it explains the limits of useful applications; it demonstrates the various types of aluminium matrix composites. Knowledge in metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | advanced materials | continuous fibre composites | discontinuously reinforced composites | particulate composites | density | thermal properties | stiffness | plastic properties | fatigue | wear resistance | interfaces | manufacturing techniques | liquid state | solid state | spray methods | in-situ production | automotive | aerospace | electronic | communication | application | sports and leisure market | corematerials | ukoer

License

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A view of the Roman Remains and People?s Park, around 1905

Description

Much of the site of Arbeia that we see today would have been covered with streets and houses during the First World War. However a small section in the middle of the fort site, containing the most extensive ruins, was open to the public as a park for recreation and to study the Roman Remains. The park was created in 1880 after excavations were carried out prior to building works and public interest in the Roman ruins was very high. It was then decided to keep 0.45 hectares of the site uncovered and the Roman Remains and People?s Park was born. Across the Southern portion of the site was Baring Street School, part of which still stands today and is part of the museum complex and in the North West corner of the site stood the lodge or the park keeper?s house. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email claire.ross@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

worldwarone | worlife1914 | twamvenues | romanruins | peoplespark | remains | landscape | view | oldestpark | alexdrysdale | southshields | site | arbeia | streets | houses | firstworldwar | fortsite | recreation | study | 1880 | publicaccess | studies | excavations | colourphotograph | buildingworks | baringstreetschool | museumcomplex | northwestcorner | lodge | parkkeepershouse | socialheritage | abstract | unusual | intriguing | industry | structure | construction | building | sky | cloud | chimney | brick | wall | roof | stone | window | glass | curtain | vegetation | bench | chair | seat | platform | grass | shrub | flowers | female | dress | hat | path | heritage | history | historical | remnants | hectares | uncovered | 1905

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | China | urban design | development | shougang | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | heritage site | environment | urban development | energy | site understanding | land use | design concept | bioremediation | transit | subway | light rail | urban planning | architecture | brownfield

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000°C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000°C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000°C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000°C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon-carbon composite

Description

Carbon-carbon composites are manufactured from continuous carbon fibres which are woven in a two or three dimensional pattern. The fibres are then impregnated with a polymeric resin. After the component has been shaped and cured the matrix is pyrolysed by heating in an inert atmosphere. This converts the matrix to carbon chain molecules which are densified by further heat treatments. The resulting composite consists of the original carbon fibres in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites have low density, high strength and high modulus. These properties are retained to temperatures above 2000°C. Creep resistance and toughness are also high, and the high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient provide thermal shock resistance. The woven structure of this composite can

Subjects

carbon-carbon composite | composite material | polymeric resin | pyrolysis | toughness | woven continuous carbon fibres | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 1402: Aluminium Matrix Composite Materials

Description

This lecture provides understanding of the state-of-the-art of aluminium matrix composite materials; it outlines the properties of aluminium matrix composite materials as a basis for materials selection; it explains the limits of useful applications; it demonstrates the various types of aluminium matrix composites. Knowledge in metallurgy, materials science, materials engineering is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | advanced materials | continuous fibre composites | discontinuously reinforced composites | particulate composites | density | thermal properties | stiffness | plastic properties | fatigue | wear resistance | interfaces | manufacturing techniques | liquid state | solid state | spray methods | in-situ production | automotive | aerospace | electronic | communication | application | sports and leisure market | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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