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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | semiconductors | ceramics | polymers | bonding | structure | energy band | microstructure | composition | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | sensors | thin films | biomaterials | cellular materials | magnetism | polarity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | fracture | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.S16 Advanced Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar will be a scientific exploration of the food we eat and enjoy. Each week we shall have a scientific edible experiment that will explore a specific food topic. This will be a hands-on seminar with mandatory attendance of at least 85%. Topics include, but are not limited to, what makes a good experiment, cheese making, joys of tofu, food biochemistry, the science of spice, what is taste? This course is the second in a series of two courses in kitchen chemistry. The prerequisite to Advanced Kitchen Chemistry is ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry, which is also on OCW.

Subjects

food | edible | hands-on | cooking | chemistry | cook | kitchen | tofu | cake | muffin | cheese | marinade | ice cream | liquid nitrogen

License

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3.91 Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT)

Description

This course is aimed at presenting the concepts underlying the response of polymeric materials to applied loads. These will include both the molecular mechanisms involved and the mathematical description of the relevant continuum mechanics. It is dominantly an "engineering" subject, but with an atomistic flavor. It covers the influence of processing and structure on mechanical properties of synthetic and natural polymers: Hookean and entropic elastic deformation, linear viscoelasticity, composite materials and laminates, yield and fracture.

Subjects

plastics; synthetic high polymers; viscoelastic phenomena; viscoelastic and strength properties; mechanical property evaluation; plastics fabrication methods | plastics | synthetic high polymers | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic and strength properties | mechanical property evaluation | plastics fabrication methods

License

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12.480 Thermodynamics for Geoscientists (MIT)

Description

In this course, principles of thermodynamics are used to infer the physical conditions of formation and modification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The course includes phase equilibria of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems and thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal crystalline solutions. It also surveys the processes that lead to the formation of metamorphic and igneous rocks in the major tectonic environments in the Earth's crust and mantle.

Subjects

Principles of thermodynamics | formation and modification of igneous and metamorphic rocks | phase equilibria of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems | thermodynamic modelling of non-ideal crystalline solutions | tectonic environments | crust | mantle | Ideal Solutions | Non-ideal Solutions | Pyroxene Thermometry | Plagioclase Feldspars Solution Models | Alkali Feldspars Solution Models | Multi-site Mineral Solutions | Homogeneous Equilibria | Quad | Spinels | Rhombohedral Oxides | T-?O2 Relations | Heterogeneous Equilibria | Multi-Component Systems | Liquidus Diagrams | Schreinemaker's Analysis | Composition Space | Gibbs Method | Silicate Melts | Mixed Volatile Equilibria P-T-XCO2-XH2O | thermodynamic models | thermodynamics

License

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10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g. Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed. The examples will use MATLAB®. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Robert Ashcraft, Sandeep Sharma, David Weingeist, and Nikolay Zaborenko for their work in preparing materials for this course site.

Subjects

Matlab | modern computational techniques in chemical engineering | mathematical techniques in chemical engineering | linear systems | scientific computing | solving sets of nonlinear algebraic equations | solving ordinary differential equations | solving differential-algebraic (DAE) systems | probability theory | use of probability theory in physical modeling | statistical analysis of data estimation | statistical analysis of parameter estimation | finite difference techniques | finite element techniques | converting partial differential equations | Navier-Stokes equations

License

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6.071J Introduction to Electronics, Signals, and Measurement (MIT)

Description

The course is designed to provide a practical - hands on - introduction to electronics with a focus on measurement and signals. The prerequisites are courses in differential equations, as well as electricity and magnetism. No prior experience with electronics is necessary. The course will integrate demonstrations and laboratory examples with lectures on the foundations. Throughout the course we will use modern "virtual instruments" as test-beds for understanding electronics. The aim of the course is to provide students with the practical knowledge necessary to work in a modern science or engineering setting.

Subjects

Electricity | electronics applications | laboratory | analog and digital circuits | signals | measurement fundamentals | 6.071 | 22.071

License

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semest

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

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21G.703 Spanish III (MIT)

Description

This course is the first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized. There are detailed simulation activities, readings about literature and art from Latin America and Spain, activities with music videos and interviews, and viewings of recent films such as El espinazo del diablo, Juana la loca, and María llena eres de gracia. Students also participate in the MITUPV Exchange project, a multimedia-centered Web site that deals with university life at MIT, the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia in Spain, and other universities.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish grammar | Spanish vocabulary | writing | essays | Culture | cultural awareness | conversation | MITUPV

License

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6.877J Computational Evolutionary Biology (MIT)

Description

Why has it been easier to develop a vaccine to eliminate polio than to control influenza or AIDS? Has there been natural selection for a 'language gene'? Why are there no animals with wheels? When does 'maximizing fitness' lead to evolutionary extinction? How are sex and parasites related? Why don't snakes eat grass? Why don't we have eyes in the back of our heads? How does modern genomics illustrate and challenge the field? This course analyzes evolution from a computational, modeling, and engineering perspective. The course has extensive hands-on laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data.

Subjects

6.877 | HST.949 | computational approaches | evolutionary biology | evolutionary theory and inferential logic of evolution by natural selection | computational and algorithmic implications and requirements of evolutionary models | whole-genome species comparison | phylogenetic tree construction | molecular evolution | homology and development | optimization and evolvability | heritability | disease evolution | detecting selection in human populations | and evolution of language | extensive laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data

License

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12.490 Advanced Igneous Petrology (MIT)

Description

Advanced Igneous Petrology covers the history of and recent developments in the study of igneous rocks. Students review the chemistry and structure of igneous rock-forming minerals and proceed to study how these minerals occur and interact in igneous rocks. The course focuses on igneous processes and how we have learned about them through studying a number of significant sites worldwide.

Subjects

petrology | igneous petrology | rock forming minerals | earth's crust | upper mantle rocks | tectonic environment | geochemistry | rock forming processes | dynamics of crust and mantle melting | Mid-ocean ridge basalts | MORB | Undersaturated mafic magmas | Magma mixing | calc-alkaline plutonic rocks | Stillwater layered igneous intrusion | Komatiites | Meteorites

License

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9.29J Introduction to Computational Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course gives a mathematical introduction to neural coding and dynamics. Topics include convolution, correlation, linear systems, game theory, signal detection theory, probability theory, information theory, and reinforcement learning. Applications to neural coding, focusing on the visual system are covered, as well as Hodgkin-Huxley and other related models of neural excitability, stochastic models of ion channels, cable theory, and models of synaptic transmission. Visit the Seung Lab Web site.

Subjects

neural coding | dynamics | convolution | correlation | linear systems | Fourier analysis | signal detection theory | probability theory | information theory | neural excitability | stochastic models | ion channels | cable theory

License

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6.092 Java Preparation for 6.170 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on introducing the language, libraries, tools and concepts of JavaTM. The course is specifically targeted at students who intend to take 6.170 in the following term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. Topics include: Object-oriented programming, primitives, arrays, objects, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, hashing, data structures, collections, nested classes, floating point precision, defensive programming, and depth-first search algorithm.

Subjects

Object oriented programming | Java program structure | class file | main | methods | fields | Primitives | Control flow | method calls | if/then | for loop | while loop | Arrays | Objects | declaration | assignment | mutation | scope | Classes vs Objects/Instances | Method Overloading | Inheritence | Abstract superclasses | Interfaces | Polymorphism | Method Overriding | Hashing | Data structures | Collections | Advanced control flow | Writing interfaces | abstract classes | True subtyping | composite | Throwing and catching exceptions | Nested classes | Floating point precision | Defensive programming | Depth First Search alogithm

License

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21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.067 | WGS.608 | Cultural performances | Asia | traditional | contemporary | genres | performers | media | cultural settings | audiences | globalization | live | video | audio | online | English

License

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11.484 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of those projects. The course gives special consideration to cases in the developing world. Students will engage in a critical analysis of these tools and their role in the political economy of international development. The course will cover topics such as alternative planning strategies for conditions of uncertainty; organizations and project cycle management; the political environment; and interactions of clients and advisers, engineers, planners, policy analysts, and other professionals. Introductory micro-economics is a pre-requisite for this course.

Subjects

project evaluation | politics | project cycle | development planning | financing | investment | cash flow | discounting | alternative investment | forecasting | inflation | risk management | risk analysis | markets | market distortin | opportunity cost | taxation | monopoly | social-distributive project appraisal | institutions | rational analysis

License

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | September 11 | memorial | discourse | media | art | collective memory | Germany | Japan | global commerce | transportation systems | surveillance | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Freud | Edward Said

License

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | yield | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | substrate solubility

License

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11.946J Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

The Beijing Urban Design Studio is a joint program between the MIT and Tsinghua University Schools of Architecture and Planning. The goal of the studio is to foster international cooperation through the undertaking of a joint urban design and planning initiative in the city of Beijing involving important, often controversial, sites and projects. Since 1995, almost 250 MIT and Tsinghua University students and faculty have participated in this annual studio, making it one of the most successful and enduring international academic programs between China and the US. It has received the Irwin Sizer Award from MIT for outstanding innovation in education. The studio takes place over five weeks in June and July including several weeks in residence at Tsinghua University and two brie

Subjects

China | Beijing | Urban planning | International relations | Site planning | Building use | Services | Zoning | Urban improvement | Reuse | Green building | Cultural understanding | 11.946 | 4.185

License

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Technical Capabilities (MIT)

Description

The economic growth of developing countries requires the acquisition of technological capabilities. In countries at the world technological frontier, such capabilities refer to cutting edge skills to innovate entirely new products. In developing countries, the requisite technological capabilities are broader, and include production engineering, project execution and incremental innovation to make borrowed technology work. Theories of technology acquisition are examined. The empirical evidence is taken from two sets of developing countries; the most advanced (Taiwan, Korea, India, China and Brazil) and the least advanced (Africa and Middle Eastern countries).

Subjects

economic growth | technological capabilities | world technological frontier | innovation | new products | production engineering | project execution | borrowed technology

License

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12.000 Solving Complex Problems (MIT)

Description

Solving Complex Problems provides an opportunity for entering freshmen to gain first-hand experience with working as part of a team to develop effective approaches to complex problems in Earth system science and engineering that do not have straightforward solutions. The subject includes training in a variety of skills, ranging from library research to Web Design. Each year's course explores a different problem in detail through the study of complimentary case histories and the development of creative solution strategies. Beginning in 2000 as an educational experiment sponsored by MIT's Committee on the Undergraduate Program, and receiving major financial support from the Alex and Britt d'Arbeloff Fund for Excellence in MIT Education, the subject is designed to enhance the fir

Subjects

small teams | effective solutions | complex problems | Earth system science and engineering | complementary case histories | creative solution strategies | Web site development | effective written and oral communication | team building

License

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11.948 Power of Place: Media Technology, Youth, and City Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This workshop provides an introduction to urban environmental design and explores the potential of information technology and the Internet to transform public education, city design, and community development in inner-city neighborhoods. Integration of comprehensive ("top-down") and grassroots ("bottom-up") approaches to design and planning is a major theme. Students will work in a real neighborhood with real people on a real project, putting theory into practice and reflecting on insights gained in the process. We will study environmental and community history and devise designs for vacant land near a middle school in West Philadelphia within the context of planning for the larger community and watershed. The class website can be found here: Power of Place: Media Technology, You

Subjects

urban environmental design | information technology | public education | city design | community development | inner-city neighborhoods | design and planning | grassroots efforts | neighborhood-based design | West Philadelphia | environmental and community history | planning | community and watershed | WPLP | school and community | interactive design | watershed | schools

License

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11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class website can be found here: Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | light | significant detail | place | poetics | narrative | urban planning | seeing | digital photography | digital editing | storytelling | community | urban revitalization | neighborhood | photography | photographs | detail | portfolio | 11.309 | 4.215

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking is explored. Students taking the gr

Subjects

honeycombs | foams | lattices | stress strain | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants

License

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RES.TTL-01 Guidelines on Learning that Inform Teaching (MIT)

Description

This handbook includes 16 Guidelines on Learning based on the research literature on student learning and accepted good teaching practice, that inform the teaching at MIT. Each Guideline is explained with appropriate quotes and there are links to examples of the guideline in action. The handbook was adapted by The MIT Teaching and Learning Laboratory from the "Guidelines on Learning that inform teaching at the University of New South Wales" and it's associated Toolkit. This has now been expanded as a generic "Guidelines on Learning that inform teaching" website with exemplar examples and written in a format to encourage other universities to draft their own set of guidelines and examples. Online Publication

Subjects

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16.90 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to numerical methods and computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques covered include numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; numerical discretization of partial differential equations; and probabilistic methods for quantifying the impact of variability. Specific emphasis is given to finite volume methods in fluid mechanics, and finite element methods in structural mechanics.Acknowledgement: Prof. David Darmofal taught this course in prior years, and created some of the materials found in this OCW site.

Subjects

numerical integration | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite volume | finite element | discretization | PDEs | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | optimization | computational methods | aerospace engineering | Monte Carlo | Fourier stability analysis | Matrix stability analysis | Runge-Kutta | convergence | accuracy | stiffness | weighted residual | statistical sampling | sensitivity analysis

License

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Description

Following their acclaimed art and poetry exhibition, Sketches from the Poem Road, shown in the Glass Tank this June and July, Isao Miura and Chris Beckett return to Oxford Brookes University to discuss some of the ways that words can be translated into visual and textual images. Translation in its broadest sense not only improves our appreciation of old texts, but can lead us to create exciting new multi-media work out of the old. The Japanese call this process uta makura, a sort of literary pilgrimage that prompted Basho to set out on a long risky journey in the spring of 1689, which he described in his prose and haiku masterpiece, The Narrow Road to the Deep North. More details can be found on the Exhibitions page of the Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre website: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/poet

Subjects

EJRC | Europe Japan Research Centre | Japanese | Anthropology | Seminars | research

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copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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