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Modern slavery Modern slavery

Description

This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Modern slavery, is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery, but also encourage an appreciation of the influence of International Human Rights Law on the development of the domestic system of human rights protection. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Modern slavery. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

The Law | The Law | People | Politics & Law | People | Politics & Law | Politics | Policy & People | Politics | Policy & People | W102_1 | W102_1 | international law | international law | human rights | human rights | slavery | slavery | modern slavery | modern slavery | trafficking in human beings | trafficking in human beings | forced labour | forced labour

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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An essay on slavery: proving from Scripture its inconsistency with humanity and religion; in answer to a late publication, entitled, "The African trade for Negro slaves shewn to be consistent with principles of humanity, and with the laws of revealed religion." By Granville Sharp, Esq. With an introductory preface, containing the sentiments of the monthly reviewers on that publication; and the opinion of several eminent writers on the subject. To which is added, an elegy on the miserable state of an African slave, by the celebrated an ingenious William Shenstone, Esq. An essay on slavery: proving from Scripture its inconsistency with humanity and religion; in answer to a late publication, entitled, "The African trade for Negro slaves shewn to be consistent with principles of humanity, and with the laws of revealed religion." By Granville Sharp, Esq. With an introductory preface, containing the sentiments of the monthly reviewers on that publication; and the opinion of several eminent writers on the subject. To which is added, an elegy on the miserable state of an African slave, by the celebrated an ingenious William Shenstone, Esq.

Description

ebook version of An essay on slavery: proving from Scripture its inconsistency with humanity and religion; in answer to a late publication, entitled, "The African trade for Negro slaves shewn to be consistent with principles of humanity, and with the laws of revealed religion." By Granville Sharp, Esq. With an introductory preface, containing the sentiments of the monthly reviewers on that publication; and the opinion of several eminent writers on the subject. To which is added, an elegy on the miserable state of an African slave, by the celebrated an ingenious William Shenstone, Esq. ebook version of An essay on slavery: proving from Scripture its inconsistency with humanity and religion; in answer to a late publication, entitled, "The African trade for Negro slaves shewn to be consistent with principles of humanity, and with the laws of revealed religion." By Granville Sharp, Esq. With an introductory preface, containing the sentiments of the monthly reviewers on that publication; and the opinion of several eminent writers on the subject. To which is added, an elegy on the miserable state of an African slave, by the celebrated an ingenious William Shenstone, Esq.

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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The case of the slave ship Progresso: the Royal Navy, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the Cape (African Studies Centre Seminar)

Description

Prof. Harries examines the surprising role the Cape played in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and the challenges the Royal Navy was forced to deal with in stopping slave ships. Professor Patrick Harries' (Basel University) examination of the historical role the Cape area played in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade offers significant conclusions on the challenges the Royal Navy faced in prohibiting the slave trade, the reality of conditions aboard slave ships, and how historians might view P.G. Hill's classic work 'Fifty Days on Board a Slave Vessel'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

slave trade | south africa | Africa | slavery | Royal Navy | the Progresso | slave trade | south africa | Africa | slavery | Royal Navy | the Progresso | 2011-02-03

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT) 21A.445J Slavery and Human Trafficking in the 21st Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery. This course explores the issue of human trafficking for forced labour and sexual slavery, focusing on its representation in recent scholarly accounts and advocacy as well as in other media. Ethnographic and fictional readings along with media analysis help to develop a contextualized and comparative understanding of the phenomena in both past and present contexts. It examines the wide range of factors and agents that enable these practices, such as technology, cultural practices, social and economic conditions, and the role of governments and international organizations. The course also discusses the analytical, moral and methodological questions of researching, writing, and representing trafficking and slavery.

Subjects

21A.445 | 21A.445 | WGS.272 | WGS.272 | slavery | slavery | human trafficking | human trafficking | sex | sex | gender | gender | human rights | human rights | race | race | capitalism | capitalism | labor exploitation | labor exploitation | public health | public health | violence | violence | child labor | child labor | organ trafficking | organ trafficking | sexual violence | sexual violence | prostitution | prostitution | white slavery | white slavery | abolitionism | abolitionism | migration | migration | border crossings | border crossings | border policing | border policing | conflict zones | conflict zones | reproductive labor | reproductive labor | sex work | sex work | technology and trafficking | technology and trafficking

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The just limitation of slavery: in the laws of God, compared with the unbounded claims of the African traders and British American slaveholders. By Granville Sharp. With a copious appendix: ... The just limitation of slavery: in the laws of God, compared with the unbounded claims of the African traders and British American slaveholders. By Granville Sharp. With a copious appendix: ...

Description

ebook version of The just limitation of slavery: in the laws of God, compared with the unbounded claims of the African traders and British American slaveholders. By Granville Sharp. With a copious appendix: ... ebook version of The just limitation of slavery: in the laws of God, compared with the unbounded claims of the African traders and British American slaveholders. By Granville Sharp. With a copious appendix: ...

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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Chains of slavery: A work wherein the clandestine and villianous attempts of princes to ruin liberty are pointed out, ...Chains of slavery. French. Chains of slavery: A work wherein the clandestine and villianous attempts of princes to ruin liberty are pointed out, ...Chains of slavery. French.

Description

ebook version of Chains of slavery: A work wherein the clandestine and villianous attempts of princes to ruin liberty are pointed out, ...Chains of slavery. French. ebook version of Chains of slavery: A work wherein the clandestine and villianous attempts of princes to ruin liberty are pointed out, ...Chains of slavery. French.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.501 The American Novel (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel (MIT)

Description

The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works. The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works.

Subjects

American novel | American novel | democracy | slavery | democracy | slavery | democracy | democracy | slavery | slavery | gender equity | gender equity | social reform | social reform | literary strategies | literary strategies | William Blake | William Blake | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | William Faulkner | William Faulkner | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT) 21H.181 Libertarianism in History (MIT)

Description

This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial This course explores the history of the ideal of personal freedom with an eye towards contemporary debates over the pros and cons of the regulatory state. The first part of the course surveys the sociological and theological sources of the concepts of freedom and civil society, and introduces liberty's leading relatives or competitors: property, equality, community, and republicanism. The second part consists of a series of case studies in the rise of modern liberty and libertarianism: the abolition of slavery, the struggle for religious freedom, and the twentieth-century American civil liberties movement. In the last part of the course, we take up debates over the role of libertarianism vs. the regulatory state in a variety of contexts: counter-terrorism, health care, the financial

Subjects

libertarianism | libertarianism | history | history | politics | politics | state | state | regulatory state | regulatory state | freedom | freedom | property | property | equality | equality | community | community | republicanism | republicanism | liberty | liberty | slavery | slavery | religious freedom | religious freedom | civil liberties | civil liberties | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | health care | health care | financial market | financial market | the internet | the internet | Rawls | Rawls | Nozick | Nozick | Obamacare | Obamacare | Rand Paul | Rand Paul | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | de Toqueville | de Toqueville | economic good | economic good | Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | capitalism | capitalism | John Locke | John Locke | distributive justice | distributive justice | communitarianism | communitarianism | civil republicanism | civil republicanism | chattel | chattel | Freedom Principle | Freedom Principle | antislavery | antislavery | First Amendment | First Amendment | free exercise | free exercise | religious accomodation | religious accomodation | phone surveillance | phone surveillance | private regulation | private regulation | Aaron Swartz | Aaron Swartz | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto | Guerilla Open Access Manifesto

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Migratory flows, colonial encounters and the histories of transatlantic slavery

Description

Olivette Otele explores how histories of transatlantic slavery impact on contemporary questions of migration Transatlantic slavery is a complex history of encounters between people of African and European descent. It is also a history of migrations, trade and subjugation. In this presentation, I look into the displacement of people from West Africa from the 17th to the 19th centuries. I ultimately aim at understanding how historians measure the impact of transatlantic slavery in Africa and its economic, social and cultural legacies. The presentation will consequently delve into Eltis? and Lovejoy?s income per capita theories and explore Manning?s loss of workforce simulation model. It will then turn to histories of the territories from which Africans were captured by looking at the r Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

African migration | slavery | development | economic development | forced migration | African migration | slavery | development | economic development | forced migration | 2017-01-25

License

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The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 311)

Subjects

history | slavery | slave trade | africa | abolition | empires | voyages | new world | middle passage | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

21H.104 | 21H.104 | 11.015 | 11.015 | riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Oroonoko: or the royal slave. A tragedy. Altered from Southerne, by Francis Gentleman. ... Oroonoko: or the royal slave. A tragedy. Altered from Southerne, by Francis Gentleman. ...

Description

ebook version of Oroonoko: or the royal slave. A tragedy. Altered from Southerne, by Francis Gentleman. ... ebook version of Oroonoko: or the royal slave. A tragedy. Altered from Southerne, by Francis Gentleman. ...

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT) 21H.104J Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History (MIT)

Description

This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment. This course uses readings and discussions to focus on a series of short-term events that shed light on American politics, culture, and social organization. It emphasizes finding ways to make sense of these complicated, highly traumatic events, and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history. The class also gives students experience with primary documentation research through a term paper assignment.

Subjects

riot | riot | strike | strike | conspiracy | conspiracy | cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | U.S. history | U.S. history | revolutionary war | revolutionary war | boston tea party | boston tea party | civil war | civil war | slavery | slavery | slave uprisings | slave uprisings | Anthony Burns | Anthony Burns | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | textile workers | textile workers | Lawrence | Lawrence | MA | MA | student uprising | student uprising | Vietnam War | Vietnam War | Columbia University | Columbia University | communism | communism | socialism | socialism | Lawrence | MA | Lawrence | MA | 21h.104 | 21h.104 | 11.015 | 11.015

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.1] The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.1]

Description

ebook version of The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.1] ebook version of The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.1]

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kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.2] The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.2]

Description

ebook version of The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.2] ebook version of The voyages, travels and adventures, of William Owen Gwin Vaughan, Esq: With the history of his brother Jonathan Vaughan, six years a slave in Tunis. Intermix'd with the histories of Clerimont, Maria, Eleanora, and others. ... [pt.2]

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: American Women Authors (MIT)

Description

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor,

Subjects

women authors | women authors | comfort women | comfort women | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | slave novel | slave novel | sensationalism | sensationalism | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | | sentimentalism | sentimentalism | realism | realism | postmodern fiction | postmodern fiction | American Revolution | American Revolution | industrialization | industrialization | urbanization | urbanization | Harlem Renaissance | Harlem Renaissance | Puritanism | Puritanism | SP.517 | SP.517 | WMN.517 | WMN.517

License

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21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT) 21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns. This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns.

Subjects

food | food | American history | American history | industrialization | industrialization | globalization | globalization | slavery | slavery | plantations | plantations | farms | farms | labor | labor | processing | processing | preservation | preservation | economy | economy | chains | chains | nutrition | nutrition | nutritional science | nutritional science | food restrictions | food restrictions | surplus | surplus | famine | famine | cooking | cooking | restaurants | restaurants | supermarkets | supermarkets | fast food | fast food | slow food | slow food | production | production | consumption | consumption

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

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Proceedings in the House of Commons on the slave trade, and state of the negroes in the West India islands. With an appendix. By Philip Francis, Esq Proceedings in the House of Commons on the slave trade, and state of the negroes in the West India islands. With an appendix. By Philip Francis, Esq

Description

ebook version of Proceedings in the House of Commons on the slave trade, and state of the negroes in the West India islands. With an appendix. By Philip Francis, Esq ebook version of Proceedings in the House of Commons on the slave trade, and state of the negroes in the West India islands. With an appendix. By Philip Francis, Esq

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The magic of Orosmanes: or, harlequin slave and sultan: a pantomime, drawn from the Arabian legends. The magic of Orosmanes: or, harlequin slave and sultan: a pantomime, drawn from the Arabian legends.

Description

ebook version of The magic of Orosmanes: or, harlequin slave and sultan: a pantomime, drawn from the Arabian legends. ebook version of The magic of Orosmanes: or, harlequin slave and sultan: a pantomime, drawn from the Arabian legends.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Modern slavery

Description

This free course is designed to develop an understanding of the international system of human rights protection in relation to modern slavery

Subjects

The Law | Law | People | W102_1 | international law | human rights | slavery | modern slavery | trafficking in human beings | forced labour

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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A day in Turkey: or, the Russian slaves. A comedy, as acted at the Theatre Royal, in Covent Garden. By Mrs. Cowley. A day in Turkey: or, the Russian slaves. A comedy, as acted at the Theatre Royal, in Covent Garden. By Mrs. Cowley.

Description

ebook version of A day in Turkey: or, the Russian slaves. A comedy, as acted at the Theatre Royal, in Covent Garden. By Mrs. Cowley. ebook version of A day in Turkey: or, the Russian slaves. A comedy, as acted at the Theatre Royal, in Covent Garden. By Mrs. Cowley.

Subjects

kind | kind | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

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