Searching for social structure : 47 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2

Contemporary French culture in a global context Contemporary French culture in a global context

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Semester two 2009. This module looks at aspects of contemporary French culture in the context of an increasingly globalised culture and economy. In part, the module explores recent attempts to defend, redefine and interpret key aspects of French identity and culture as a means of negotiating ways of living in an era of globalisation and changing social structures. The module focuses on aspects of everyday life in France that are charged with political and economic significance, namely food/wine production and consumption and sport. These areas all raise questions about a range of issues: the national and the ‘local’ versus the global; constructions of Frenchness in opposition to America; th This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Semester two 2009. This module looks at aspects of contemporary French culture in the context of an increasingly globalised culture and economy. In part, the module explores recent attempts to defend, redefine and interpret key aspects of French identity and culture as a means of negotiating ways of living in an era of globalisation and changing social structures. The module focuses on aspects of everyday life in France that are charged with political and economic significance, namely food/wine production and consumption and sport. These areas all raise questions about a range of issues: the national and the ‘local’ versus the global; constructions of Frenchness in opposition to America; th

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | contemporary French culture | contemporary French culture | French identity | French identity | French culture | French culture | globalisation | globalisation | changing social structures | changing social structures | food production | food production | wine production | wine production | constructions of Frenchness | constructions of Frenchness | Mondovino | Mondovino

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Elites and Societies: Are our rules capable of solving the crisis? Are our societies finding solutions for themselves?

Description

Sociologists Donatella Della Porta and Ferenc Miszlivetz both give talks for the Volcano symposium: a series of events discussing the current global crisis. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social structures | Ferenc Miszlivetz | volcano symposium | crisis of society | Donatella Della Porta | social structures | Ferenc Miszlivetz | volcano symposium | crisis of society | Donatella Della Porta

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129066/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | China | Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks -- culture, social structure, and institutions -- that you can use examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq,

Subjects

Democracy | Democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | Corruption | Corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Yugoslavia | Yugoslavia | post-Communist Russia | post-Communist Russia | China | China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | race | race | oppression | oppression | social structures | social structures | transnationalism | transnationalism | globalization | globalization | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT) 24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences. This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | Ontology | methodology | methodology | social science | social science | human being | human being | human behavior | human behavior | social structure | social structure | practices | practices | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | individual | individual | society | society | mental state | mental state | values | values | theory | theory | objectivity | objectivity | reductionism | reductionism | individualism | individualism | holism | holism | prediction | prediction | laws | laws | explanation | explanation | rational choice | rational choice | functional | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others. This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others.

Subjects

history of science | history of science | philosophy | philosophy | ancient history | ancient history | medieval history | medieval history | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | natural history | natural history | cosmology | cosmology | psychology | psychology | relativity | relativity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sociology of Human Reproduction

Description

This module examines the social and cultural relations of human reproduction. It outlines the ways in which ideals about femininity, masculinity, gender relationships and ‘normal’ families are present in debates about who should and should not have children. It introduces a range of feminist theories on human reproduction and draws on empirical studies to explain and explore theoretical issues. It shows the interrelationship between social structures and controls over human reproduction, and how studying the way that society understands human reproduction helps to understand these wider social structures.

Subjects

sociology_of_human_reproduction | human_reproduction | sociology | medical_sociology | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers theories about the form that settlements should take and attempts a distinction between descriptive and normative theory by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. Case studies will highlight the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. Through examples and historical context, current issues of city form in relation to city-making, social structure, and physical design will also be discussed and analyzed.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | architecture | architecture | modernism | modernism | typology | typology | form | form | space | space | grid | grid | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | Kevin Lynch | Kevin Lynch | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | utopianism | utopianism | suburb | suburb | suburban development | suburban development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT) 4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class. Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | typology | typology | form | form | space making | space making | mythology | mythology | industrialization | industrialization | urban history | urban history | political urbanism | political urbanism | London | London | Paris | Paris | Jerusalem | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | Johannesburg | New York | New York | St. Petersburg | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Barcelona | Vienna | Vienna | Chicago | Chicago | Berlin | Berlin | Chandigarh | Chandigarh | urban development | urban development | theories of place | theories of place | utopianism | utopianism | suburbs | suburbs | suburban development | suburban development | 4.241 | 4.241 | 11.330 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | democracy | political institutions | political institutions | economic development | economic development | political conflict | political conflict | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | India | India | Weimar Germany | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | market-oriented reform | Brazil | Brazil | corruption | corruption | Mexico | Mexico | ethnic violence | ethnic violence | Iraq | Iraq | president | president | division of power | division of power | China | China | gross domestic product | gross domestic product | GDP | GDP | political science | political science | culture | culture | Italy | Italy | Putnam | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | Lipset | leadership | leadership | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | democratization | democratization | modernization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT) 21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines major social and political trends, events, debates and personalities which help place aspects of contemporary French culture in their historical perspective through fiction, films, essays, newspaper articles, and television. Topics include the heritage of the French Revolution, the growth and consequences of colonialism, the role of intellectuals in public debates, the impact of the Occupation, the modernization of the economy and of social structures. The sources and meanings of national symbols, monuments, myths and manifestoes are also studied. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Taught in French. This course examines major social and political trends, events, debates and personalities which help place aspects of contemporary French culture in their historical perspective through fiction, films, essays, newspaper articles, and television. Topics include the heritage of the French Revolution, the growth and consequences of colonialism, the role of intellectuals in public debates, the impact of the Occupation, the modernization of the economy and of social structures. The sources and meanings of national symbols, monuments, myths and manifestoes are also studied. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Taught in French.

Subjects

culture française | culture française | produits culturels | produits culturels | 20ième siècle | 20ième siècle | ces types français | ces types français | 21ième siècle | 21ième siècle | Arsène Lupin | Arsène Lupin | la Marianne | la Marianne | la flâneuse. le flâneuer | la flâneuse. le flâneuer | Agnes Varda | Agnes Varda | Le Monde | Le Monde | Le Figaro | Le Figaro | Libération | Libération | Balzac | Balzac | Baudelaire | Baudelaire | Cléo de 5 à 7 | Cléo de 5 à 7 | Breton | Breton | Nadja | Nadja | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Pennac | Pennac | Zola | Zola

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of "community," the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice. This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk vi

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Visioning Studies: A Socio-technical Approach to Designing the Future

Description

Diane H. Sonnenwald's Keynote talk from the OII Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", March 2012. This is a Keynote talk from the Oxford Internet Institute's Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", held in Oxford on 12 March 2012. It is increasingly important to understand the potential impact of future technology in complex contexts as early as possible in the research and development (R&D) cycle. Understanding the potential impact, including its interaction with social structures, helps inform funding and research decisions. It identifies technology capabilities that may enhance the technology's adoption and use, and reduce its unintended negative consequences. It also uncovers potential conflicts with cur Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

knowledge | internet | science | digital | research | social | policy | technology | social science | knowledge | internet | science | digital | research | social | policy | technology | social science | 2012-03-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Visioning Studies: A Socio-technical Approach to Designing the Future

Description

Diane H. Sonnenwald's Keynote talk from the OII Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", March 2012. This is a Keynote talk from the Oxford Internet Institute's Symposium "Social Science and Digital Research: Interdisciplinary Insights", held in Oxford on 12 March 2012. It is increasingly important to understand the potential impact of future technology in complex contexts as early as possible in the research and development (R&D) cycle. Understanding the potential impact, including its interaction with social structures, helps inform funding and research decisions. It identifies technology capabilities that may enhance the technology's adoption and use, and reduce its unintended negative consequences. It also uncovers potential conflicts with cur Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

knowledge | internet | science | digital | research | social | policy | technology | social science | knowledge | internet | science | digital | research | social | policy | technology | social science | 2012-03-12

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129021/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.241J Theory of City Form (MIT)

Description

Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form over time. The class will concentrate on the origins of the modern city and theories about its emerging form, including the transformation of the nineteenth-century city and its organization. It analyzes current issues of city form in relation to city making, social structure, and physical design. Case studies of several cities will be presented as examples of the theories discussed in the class.

Subjects

cities | urbanism | typology | form | space making | mythology | industrialization | urban history | political urbanism | London | Paris | Jerusalem | Johannesburg | New York | St. Petersburg | Barcelona | Vienna | Chicago | Berlin | Chandigarh | urban development | theories of place | utopianism | suburbs | suburban development | 4.241 | 11.330

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and civil war? We will use examples from a wide range of countries including Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, and the Un

Subjects

democracy | political institutions | economic development | political conflict | ethnic conflict | India | Weimar Germany | market-oriented reform | Brazil | corruption | Mexico | ethnic violence | Iraq | president | division of power | China | gross domestic product | GDP | political science | culture | Italy | Putnam | U. S. Constitution | Lipset | leadership | Machiavelli | democratization | modernization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | methodology | social science | human being | human behavior | social structure | practices | norms | institutions | individual | society | mental state | values | theory | objectivity | reductionism | individualism | holism | prediction | laws | explanation | rational choice | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Studying mammals: food for thought

Description

Who were our ancestors? How are apes and humans related? And where does the extinct Homo erectus fit into the puzzle? In this unit we will examine culture, tool use and social structure in both apes and humans to gain an understanding of where we come from and why we behave as we do. This is the tenth unit in the ‘Studying mammals’ series.

Subjects

humans | mammals | primates | science and nature | evolution | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Ethnicity and "race"

Description

This module will explore the concepts of ‘race’, racism, ethnicity (religion and language), identity and nationalism in an historical and comparative manner. It will be concentrating on issues of power and domination, for example it will consider the legacy that imperial rule has left on social structures.

Subjects

sociology | race | ethnicity | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Minor Green Blue City

Description

Why? Dutch cities have to deal with two important, complex and sometimes intertwined problems. Climate change has become a visible problem in the urban environment of the Netherlands. Cities cope with heavy rainfall in short periods of time and heat stress occurs more often which even leads to more casualties. At the same time large parts of existing neighbourhoods are falling into decay. Residents with high income move out, leaving the disadvantaged behind. The social structure of the neighbourhood becomes fragile. Both problems should be solved. The task of the urban planner is to introduce and design sustainable urban interventions, creating future proof neighbourhoods within the framework of a green blue city. What will you learn? Students participating in the minor Green Blue City

Subjects

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://feeds2.feedburner.com/tudelft/OCW?format=xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Minor Green Blue City

Description

Why? Dutch cities have to deal with two important, complex and sometimes intertwined problems. Climate change has become a visible problem in the urban environment of the Netherlands. Cities cope with heavy rainfall in short periods of time and heat stress occurs more often which even leads to more casualties. At the same time large parts of existing neighbourhoods are falling into decay. Residents with high income move out, leaving the disadvantaged behind. The social structure of the neighbourhood becomes fragile. Both problems should be solved. The task of the urban planner is to introduce and design sustainable urban interventions, creating future proof neighbourhoods within the framework of a green blue city. What will you learn? Students participating in the minor Green Blue City

Subjects

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://feeds2.feedburner.com/tudelft/OCW?format=xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21F.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines major social and political trends, events, debates and personalities which help place aspects of contemporary French culture in their historical perspective through fiction, films, essays, newspaper articles, and television. Topics include the heritage of the French Revolution, the growth and consequences of colonialism, the role of intellectuals in public debates, the impact of the Occupation, the modernization of the economy and of social structures. The sources and meanings of national symbols, monuments, myths and manifestoes are also studied. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. Taught in French.

Subjects

aise | produits culturels | me sicle | ais | ne Lupin | la Marianne | neuse. le flneuer | Agnes Varda | Le Monde | Le Figaro | ration | Balzac | Baudelaire | o de 5 7 | Breton | Nadja | Simone de Beauvoir | Pennac | Zola

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21F.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata