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HST.723 Neural Coding and Perception of Sound (MIT)

Description

Neural structures and mechanisms mediating the detection, localization and recognition of sounds. We will discuss how acoustic signals are coded by auditory neurons, the impact of these codes on behavioral performance, and the circuitry and cellular mechanisms underlying signal transformations. Topics include temporal coding, neural maps and feature detectors, learning and plasticity, and feedback control. General principles are conveyed by theme discussions of auditory masking, sound localization, musical pitch, speech coding, and cochlear implants.

Subjects

hearing | neural structures | auditory masking | acoustics | signal transformations | temporal coding | neural maps | feature detectors | learning | plasticity | feedback control | sound localization | musical pitch | speech coding | cochlear implants

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Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT)

Description

Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play

Subjects

CNS structures | development | plasticity | anatomy | tissue culture | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | growth factors | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | corpus striatum | brain transplants | limbic system | Mammals -- Physiology

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International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | migration | international relations | political science | environment | public policy | transnational organization | sustainable development | global change | government | technology | security | civil society | political theory | theory | policy | emergent structures | processes | flows | goods | services | national boundaries | international trade | immigration | international policies | macro-level | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | integration | national economies | IR | IPE | sovereignty | inter-state relations | supra-state | non-state | narrow globalization | comlex view | international conflict | domestic politics | international politics | population movements | macro-level behavior | complex view

License

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10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control (MIT)

Description

Introduction to dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; model-based control; applications to process equipment.Technical RequirementsAny number of software tools can be used to import the .csv files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recommendations.MATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.

Subjects

process operations | control strategies | feedback | feedforward | control structures | model-based control | process equipment

License

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4.491 Form-Finding and Structural Optimization: Gaudi Workshop (MIT)

Description

Inspired by the work of the architect Antoni Gaudi, this research workshop will explore three-dimensional problems in the static equilibrium of structural systems. Through an interdisciplinary collaboration between computer science and architecture, we will develop design tools for determining the form of three-dimensional structural systems under a variety of loads. The goal of the workshop is to develop real-time design and analysis tools which will be useful to architects and engineers in the form-finding of efficient three-dimensional structural systems.

Subjects

structures | statics | architecture | Gaudi | Barcelona | computer science | structural systems | computer modeling | advanced dynamics | form-finding | shaping structures | mesh generation | procedural methods for creating structural elements | physical simulation procedures | interactive design tools | structural analysis | computer graphics | mathematics of nodal systems

License

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4.448 Analysis of Historic Structures (MIT)

Description

An analysis of historical structures is presented themed sections based around construction materials. Structures from all periods of history are analyzed. The goal of the class is to provide an understanding of the preservation of historic structures for all students.

Subjects

sructures | architecture | design | construction | materials | structural analysis | statics | masonry | timber | concrete | steel | structural types | structural systems | medieval | renaissance | modern

License

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t

Subjects

computer | engineering | problem solving | software | software development | programming | graphical user interface | numerical methods | data structures | sorting | searching | computer graphics | Java

License

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1.204 Computer Algorithms in Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course covers concepts of computation used in analysis of engineering systems. It includes the following topics: data structures, relational database representations of engineering data, algorithms for the solution and optimization of engineering system designs (greedy, dynamic programming, branch and bound, graph algorithms, nonlinear optimization), and introduction to complexity analysis. Object-oriented, efficient implementations of algorithms are emphasized.

Subjects

databases | data structures | divide and conquer algorithm | greedy algorithm | dynamic programming | branch and bound | linear optimization | nonlinear optimization | approximate queues | network designs

License

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1.34 Waste Containment and Remediation Technology (MIT)

Description

1.34 focuses on the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, with specific emphasis on the design of land-based waste containment structures and hazardous waste remediation. Topics include: introduction to hazardous waste, definition of hazardous waste, regulatory requirements, waste characteristics, geo-chemistry, and contaminant transport; the design and operation of waste containment structures, landfills, impoundments, and mine-waste disposal; the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites, the superfund law, preliminary site assessment, site investigation techniques, and remediation technologies; and monitoring requirements.

Subjects

waste containment | waste remediation | soil remediation | groundwater remediation | contaminated site | contamination | waste disposal | mass transport | Superfund | EPA | USGS | air sparging | air stripper | bioremediation | soil vapor extraction | SVE | pump and treat | landfill | leachate | chlorinated solvent | NAPL | LNAPL | DNAPL | TCE | PCE | risk assessment | soil liner | clay liner | geomembrane | brownfield | remediation technologies

License

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1.124J Foundations of Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

This is a foundation subject in modern software development techniques for engineering and information technology. The design and development of component-based software (using C# and .NET) is covered; data structures and algorithms for modeling, analysis, and visualization; basic problem-solving techniques; web services; and the management and maintenance of software. Includes a treatment of topics such as sorting and searching algorithms; and numerical simulation techniques. Foundation for in-depth exploration of image processing, computational geometry, finite element methods, network methods and e-business applications. This course is a core requirement for the Information Technology M. Eng. program. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.470J.

Subjects

modern software development | engineering and information technology | component-based software | C# | .NET | data structures | algorithms for modeling | analysis | visualization | basic problem-solving techniques | web services | management and maintenance of software | sorting | searching | algorithms | numerical simulation techniques | image processing | computational geometry | finite element methods | network methods | e-business applications | classes | objects | inheritance | virtual functions | abstract classes | polymorphism | Java applications | applets | Abstract Windowing Toolkit | Graphics | Threads | Java | C++ | information technology | engineering | modeling algorithms | basic problem-solving | software management | software maintenance | searching algorithms | numerical simulation | object oriented programming | 13.470J | 1.124 | 2.159 | 13.470

License

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2.019 Design of Ocean Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the complete cycle of designing an ocean system using computational design tools for the conceptual and preliminary design stages. Students complete the projects in teams with each student responsible for a specific subsystem. Lectures cover such topics as hydrodynamics; structures; power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles; environment, materials, and construction for ocean use; and generation and evaluation of design alternatives. The course focuses on innovative design concepts chosen from high-speed ships, submersibles, autonomous vehicles, and floating and submerged deep-water offshore platforms. Lectures on ethics in engineering practice are included, and instruction and practice in oral and written communication is provided.

Subjects

ocean environment | seakeeping | hydrodynamics | mooring dynamics | propulsion and power | structural dynamics | manufacturing and fabrication | floating offshore structures | design process | group dynamics | ethics in engineering practice

License

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2.081J Plates and Shells (MIT)

Description

This course explores the following topics: derivation of elastic and plastic stress-strain relations for plate and shell elements; the bending and buckling of rectangular plates; nonlinear geometric effects; post-buckling and ultimate strength of cold formed sections and typical stiffened panels used in naval architecture; the general theory of elastic shells and axisymmetric shells; buckling, crushing and bending strength of cylindrical shells with application to offshore structures; and the application to crashworthiness of vehicles and explosive and impact loading of structures. The class is taught during the first half of term.

Subjects

plates | shells | engineering strain | strain measure | bending moment | structural plasticity | membrane energy | green-lagrangian strain | bending theory of plates | buckling theory of plates | raleigh-ritz quotient | local buckling | plastic buckling | cylindrical shells | axial load | lateral pressure | hydrostatic pressure | torsion | bending boundary conditions | strain-displacement | 2.081 | 16.230

License

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15.649 The Law of Mergers and Acquisitions (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the law-sensitive aspects of Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A). In Module I, we examine the legal implications of key roles and deal structures, and walk through some of the issues that would typically arise in a simple and friendly transaction. We also give a class to the legal issues arising in LBOs and the legal concerns of financial sponsors more generally, and another class to employment-related issues, including those relating to managers facing unsettled circumstances. In Module II, we look at a variety of complications, including those that arise in the friendly or unfriendly purchase of a publicly-held company; deals involving distressed and hi-tech companies; antitrust concerns; allegations of misconduct by management

Subjects

employment | non-US companies | employment-related issues | egal implications of key roles and deal structures | legal concerns of financial sponsors | publicly-held company | deals involving distressed and hi-tech companies | antitrust concerns | allegations of misconduct

License

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16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT) 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints. This course serves as an introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications are drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; finite-difference, finite-volume, and finite-element discretization of partial differential equations; numerical linear algebra; eigenvalue problems; and optimization with constraints.

Subjects

numerical integration | numerical integration | ODEs | ODEs | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | finite difference | finite difference | finite volume | finite volume | finite element | finite element | discretization | discretization | PDEs | PDEs | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | numerical linear algebra | numerical linear algebra | probabilistic methods | probabilistic methods | optimization | optimization | omputational methods | omputational methods | aerospace engineering | aerospace engineering | computational methods | computational methods

License

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6.635 Advanced Electromagnetism (MIT)

Description

In 6.635, topics covered include: special relativity, electrodynamics of moving media, waves in dispersive media, microstrip integrated circuits, quantum optics, remote sensing, radiative transfer theory, scattering by rough surfaces, effective permittivities, random media, Green's functions for planarly layered media, integral equations in electromagnetics, method of moments, time domain method of moments, EM waves in periodic structures: photonic crystals and negative refraction.

Subjects

electromagnetism | special relativity | electrodynamics | waves | dispersive media | microstrip integrated circuits | quantum optics | remote sensing | radiative transfer theory | scattering | effective permittivities | random media | Green's functions | planarly layered media | integral equations | method of moments | time domain method of moments | EM waves | periodic structures | photonic crystals | negative refraction

License

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6.435 System Identification (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues.

Subjects

mathematical models | time series | state-space | input-output models | model structures | parametrization | identifiability | non-parametric methods | prediction error | parameter estimation | convergence | consistency | andasymptotic distribution | maximum likelihood estimation | recursive estimation | Kalman filters | structure determination | order estimation | Akaike criterion | bounded noise models | robustness

License

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3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT) 3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties and Applications (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course reviews the processing and structure of cellular materials as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites, develops models for the mechanical behavior of cellular solids, and shows how the unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices and thermal insulation. The applications of cellular solids in medicine include increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopaedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materi

Subjects

honeycombs | honeycombs | foams | foams | lattices | lattices | stress strain | stress strain | elasticity | elasticity | bending compressive collapse stress | bending compressive collapse stress | fracture | fracture | trabecular bone | trabecular bone | osteoporosis | osteoporosis | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | scaffolds | scaffolds | energy absorption devices | energy absorption devices | structural sandwich panels | structural sandwich panels | cellular structures in plants | cellular structures in plants

License

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6.006 Introduction to Algorithms (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling of computational problems. It covers the common algorithms, algorithmic paradigms, and data structures used to solve these problems. The course emphasizes the relationship between algorithms and programming, and introduces basic performance measures and analysis techniques for these problems.

Subjects

algorithms | data structures | algorithm performance | algorithm analysis | sorting | trees | hashing | numerics | graphs | shortest paths | dynamic programming | Python

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | economics | urban planning | linkages | theories | accounts | policies | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | local economy | regional-development issues | investment | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | economics | urban planning | linkages | theories | accounts | policies | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | local economy | regional-development issues | investment | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

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Geological, Geophysical, Geochemical, Environmental Studies of Some Impact Craters of the Earth (MIT)

Description

There are now about 170 identified impact craters on the Earth, and this number is growing, ever since the well known discovery of Meteor Crater in 1920s. Currently, multi-interdisciplinary research studies of impact structures are getting conducted in fields like mineralogy, petrology, environmental geology, and marine biology. The course objectives are to introduce basic principles of impact cratering, understand the application of analytical tools, and become familiar with geological, geochemical and environmental studies. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

terrestrial impact cratering | terrestrial impact structures | Argon dating | ICPMS | X-ray diffraction | INAA | environmental geochemistry

License

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12.090 Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-Generated Sedimentary Structures (MIT)

Description

This course begins by introducing students to aspects of fluid dynamics relevant to transport and deposition of particulate sedimentary materials. Emphasis is on the structure of turbulent shear flows and the forces exerted by fluid motions on bed of loosed sediment. With fluid dynamics as background, the course deals with sediment movement as bed load and suspended load, and with the geometry, kinematics, and dynamics of ripple and dune bed forms. The course concludes with basic material on the styles of current-generated primary sedimentary structures, with emphasis on cross stratification.

Subjects

geology | rocks | sedimentary | fluid motions | sediment transport | sedimentary structures | viscosity | diffusion | turbulence | boundary layers | laminar flow | stress | shear stress | oscillatory-flow | combined-flow | wind ripples | Eolian dunes | cross stratification | planar lamination

License

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6.781J Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys techniques to fabricate and analyze submicron and nanometer structures, with applications. Optical and electron microscopy is reviewed. Additional topics that are covered include: surface characterization, preparation, and measurement techniques, resist technology, optical projection, interferometric, X-ray, ion, and electron lithography; Aqueous, ion, and plasma etching techniques; lift-off and electroplating; and ion implantation. Applications in microelectronics, microphotonics, information storage, and nanotechnology will also be explored.AcknowledgementsThe Instructors would like to thank Bob Barsotti, Bryan Cord, and Ben Wunsch for their work on the Atomic Force Microscope video. They would also like to thank Bryan Cord for creating each video.

Subjects

submicron and nanometer structures | optical and electron microscopy | Surface characterization | preparation | and measurement techniques | Resist technology | optical projection | interferometric | X-ray | ion | and electron lithography | Aqueous | and plasma etching techniques | Lift-off and electroplating | Ion implantation | microelectronics | microphotonics | information storage | and nanotechnology

License

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semest

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.501 Introduction to Technology and Cities (MIT)

Description

This seminar is an introduction to the usage and impacts of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on urban planning, the urban environment and communities. Students will explore how social relationships, our sense of community, the urban infrastructure, and planning practice have been affected by technological change. Literature reviews, guest speakers, and web surfing will provide examples and issues that are debated in class and homework exercises. We will examine metropolitan information infrastructures, urban modeling and visualization, e-government, collaborative planning, and cyber communities. Students will attend a regular Tuesday seminar and occasional seminars of invited speakers during lunchtime on Fridays or Mondays. During the past two decades, ICTs have become so

Subjects

GIS | E-Government | information and communication technology | metropolitan information infrastructures | urban modeling and visualization | e-government | collaborative planning | and cyber communities | ICT | neighborhood | community | urban planning | IT

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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