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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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IPP 2012 (Big Data) Keynote: Duncan Watts IPP 2012 (Big Data) Keynote: Duncan Watts

Description

Duncan Watts discusses the opportunities and challenges posed by big data for research and public policy-making during his opening keynote of the conference "IPP2012: Big Data: Big Challenges". Duncan Watts discusses the opportunities and challenges posed by big data for research and public policy-making during his opening keynote of the conference "IPP2012: Big Data: Big Challenges".

Subjects

information | information | citizen | citizen | big data | big data | government | government | data | data | civic engagement | civic engagement | collective action | collective action | social behaviour | social behaviour | privacy | privacy | open data | open data | internet | internet | policy | policy | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | technology | technology | ethics | ethics | society | society | information | citizen | big data | government | data | civic engagement | collective action | social behaviour | privacy | open data | internet | policy | politics | public policy | technology | ethics | society | information | citizen | big data | government | data | civic engagement | collective action | social behaviour | privacy | open data | internet | policy | politics | public policy | technology | ethics | society

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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IPP 2012 (Big Data) Keynote: Duncan Watts IPP 2012 (Big Data) Keynote: Duncan Watts

Description

Duncan Watts discusses the opportunities and challenges posed by big data for research and public policy-making during his opening keynote of the conference "IPP2012: Big Data: Big Challenges". Duncan Watts discusses the opportunities and challenges posed by big data for research and public policy-making during his opening keynote of the conference "IPP2012: Big Data: Big Challenges".

Subjects

information | information | citizen | citizen | big data | big data | government | government | data | data | civic engagement | civic engagement | collective action | collective action | social behaviour | social behaviour | privacy | privacy | open data | open data | internet | internet | policy | policy | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | technology | technology | ethics | ethics | society | society | information | citizen | big data | government | data | civic engagement | collective action | social behaviour | privacy | open data | internet | policy | politics | public policy | technology | ethics | society | information | citizen | big data | government | data | civic engagement | collective action | social behaviour | privacy | open data | internet | policy | politics | public policy | technology | ethics | society

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | political accountability | health and safety factors | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments. This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI papers, have a good grasp on what is known about high-level vision from fMRI, and design their own fMRI experiments.

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT) 21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed. This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Subjects

21H.225 | 21H.225 | WGS.161 | WGS.161 | gender studies | gender studies | suffrage | suffrage | women's rights | women's rights | feminism | feminism | sexual harrassment | sexual harrassment | law | law | women's rights movement | women's rights movement | affirmative action | affirmative action | sexual liberation | sexual liberation | miscegination laws | miscegination laws | social movements | social movements | SP.607J | SP.607J | WMN.607J | WMN.607J | SP.607 | SP.607 | WMN.607 | WMN.607

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.004 Modeling Dynamics and Control II (MIT) 2.004 Modeling Dynamics and Control II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second subject of a two-term sequence on modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Topics covered include: kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, including rigid bodies in plane motion linear and angular momentum principles impact and collision problems linearization about equilibrium free and forced vibrations sensors and actuators control of mechanical systems integral and derivative action, lead and lag compensators root-locus design methods frequency-domain design methods applications to case-studies of multi-domain systems This course is the second subject of a two-term sequence on modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Topics covered include: kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, including rigid bodies in plane motion linear and angular momentum principles impact and collision problems linearization about equilibrium free and forced vibrations sensors and actuators control of mechanical systems integral and derivative action, lead and lag compensators root-locus design methods frequency-domain design methods applications to case-studies of multi-domain systems

Subjects

Kinematics | | Kinematics | | dynamics of mechanical systems | | dynamics of mechanical systems | | Linear and angular momentum principles | | Linear and angular momentum principles | | Linearization about equilibrium | | Linearization about equilibrium | | Integral and derivative action | | Integral and derivative action | | lead and lag compensators | | lead and lag compensators | | Root-locus design methods | | Root-locus design methods | | Frequency-domain design methods | | Frequency-domain design methods | | multi-domain systems. | multi-domain systems.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT) MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots). This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots).

Subjects

cooperative machines | cooperative machines | robotics | robotics | electrical engineering | electrical engineering | manufacture | manufacture | human interaction | human interaction | perception | perception | emotion | emotion | theory of mind | theory of mind | behavior and the mind | behavior and the mind | robots | robots | human-machine collaboration | human-machine collaboration | intention and action | intention and action | teamwork | teamwork

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.36J System and Project Management (MIT) ESD.36J System and Project Management (MIT)

Description

The course is designed for students in the System Design and Management (SDM) program and therefore assumes that you already have a basic knowledge of project management. The objective is to introduce advanced methods and tools of project management in a realistic context such that they can be taken back to the workplace to improve management of development projects. In contrast to traditional courses on the subject we will emphasize scenarios that cannot be fully predicted such as task iterations, unplanned rework, perceived versus actual progress and misalignments between tasks, product architectures and organizations. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.615J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanica The course is designed for students in the System Design and Management (SDM) program and therefore assumes that you already have a basic knowledge of project management. The objective is to introduce advanced methods and tools of project management in a realistic context such that they can be taken back to the workplace to improve management of development projects. In contrast to traditional courses on the subject we will emphasize scenarios that cannot be fully predicted such as task iterations, unplanned rework, perceived versus actual progress and misalignments between tasks, product architectures and organizations. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.615J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanica

Subjects

system and project management | system and project management | product development | product development | PERT | PERT | CPM | CPM | design structure matrix | design structure matrix | DSM | DSM | system dynamics | system dynamics | SD | SD | SPM | SPM | product development process | product development process | PDP | PDP | concurrent engineering | concurrent engineering | project monitoring | project monitoring | resource consumption | resource consumption | critical paths | critical paths | project progress | project progress | corrective action | corrective action | system dynamics models | system dynamics models | ESD.36 | ESD.36 | 1.432 | 1.432

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT) 9.71 Functional MRI of High-Level Vision (MIT)

Description

Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI Fundamental questions about the human brain can now be answered using straightforward applications of fMRI. This is particularly true in the area of high-level vision, the study of how we interpret and use visual information (including object recognition, visual attention, perceptual awareness, visually guided action, visual memory, and other topics). Students will read, present to the class, and critique current neuroimaging articles, as well as write detailed proposals for experiments of their own.This course covers the basics of fMRI, the strengths and limitations of fMRI compared to other techniques, and the design and analysis of fMRI experiments, focusing primarily on experiments on high-level vision. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and critique published fMRI

Subjects

functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) | neural activity | neural activity | human | human | brain | brain | noninvasive | noninvasive | resolution | resolution | high-level vision | high-level vision | object recognition | object recognition | visual attention | visual attention | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness | visually guided action | visually guided action | visual memory | visual memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.962 General Relativity (MIT) 8.962 General Relativity (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, gravitomagnetism, gravitational radiation, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology. This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, gravitomagnetism, gravitational radiation, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Subjects

Einstein's general theory of relativity | Einstein's general theory of relativity | Einstein | Einstein | relativity | relativity | differential geometry | differential geometry | general relativity | general relativity | black holes | black holes | cosmology | cosmology | Hamiltonian Dynamics | Hamiltonian Dynamics | Curvature | Curvature | Acceleration | Acceleration | Hilbert action | Hilbert action | Orthonormal bases | Orthonormal bases | White dwarfs | White dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | Kruskal coordinates | Kruskal coordinates | Wormholes | Wormholes | Hawking radiation | Hawking radiation | Kerr solution | Kerr solution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies. This introductory course is structured to cultivate the key sensibilities necessary for effective planning practice in newly industrializing countries. The word "sensibility" refers to an awareness of key developmental issues, interdependent causalities, and anticipated as well as unanticipated consequences of social action which mark most planning efforts. In cultivating such sensibilities, this course will use examples from varying institutional settings, ranging from the local to the international levels, and probe how the particularities of each setting call for an awareness of particular institutional opportunities and constraints that planners need to account for when devising planning strategies.

Subjects

developing-country governments | developing-country governments | international organizations | international organizations | NGOs | NGOs | economies of scale | economies of scale | diseconomies of scale | diseconomies of scale | international development planning | international development planning | externality | externality | historical advances in developing and developing countries | historical advances in developing and developing countries | interaction between planners and institutions | interaction between planners and institutions | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | decentralization | provision of low-cost housing | new-town development | progress | progress | anti-planning arguments | anti-planning arguments | state-centered planning | state-centered planning | social control | social control | bureaucracies | bureaucracies | good governance | good governance | market institutions | market institutions | collective action | collective action | decision making | decision making | political savvy | political savvy | legal sensibility | legal sensibility

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT) MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots). This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots).

Subjects

cooperative machines | cooperative machines | robotics | robotics | electrical engineering | electrical engineering | manufacture | manufacture | human interaction | human interaction | perception | perception | emotion | emotion | theory of mind | theory of mind | behavior and the mind | behavior and the mind | robots | robots | human-machine collaboration | human-machine collaboration | intention and action | intention and action | teamwork | teamwork

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT) 21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed. This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Subjects

21H.225 | 21H.225 | WGS.161 | WGS.161 | gender studies | gender studies | suffrage | suffrage | women's rights | women's rights | feminism | feminism | sexual harrassment | sexual harrassment | law | law | women's rights movement | women's rights movement | affirmative action | affirmative action | sexual liberation | sexual liberation | miscegination laws | miscegination laws | social movements | social movements | SP.607J | SP.607J | WMN.607J | WMN.607J | SP.607 | SP.607 | WMN.607 | WMN.607

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.617 The Law of Corporate Finance and Financial Markets (MIT) 15.617 The Law of Corporate Finance and Financial Markets (MIT)

Description

Much of 15.617 focuses on mergers and acquisitions (M&A), and the law-sensitive aspects of financial services and financial markets. The course is designed to be an introduction to business law that covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations. This class also provides an in-depth treatment of the law of finance. Much of 15.617 focuses on mergers and acquisitions (M&A), and the law-sensitive aspects of financial services and financial markets. The course is designed to be an introduction to business law that covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations. This class also provides an in-depth treatment of the law of finance.

Subjects

corporate finance | corporate finance | financial markets | financial markets | finance law | finance law | corporate law | corporate law | business law | business law | contracts | contracts | liability | liability | regulation | regulation | employment | employment | mergers | mergers | acquisitions | acquisitions | A | A | international financial markets | international financial markets | venture capital | venture capital | private equity | private equity | corporate financial structure | corporate financial structure | antitrust | antitrust | bankruptcy | bankruptcy | reorganization | reorganization | financial products | financial products | financial services | financial services | financial liability | financial liability | courts | courts | legal action | legal action | taxes | taxes | tax law | tax law | deal structures | deal structures | purchase agreement | purchase agreement | buying companies | buying companies | purchasing company | purchasing company | joint ventures | joint ventures | publicly-held corporations | publicly-held corporations | public offerings | public offerings | commercial lending | commercial lending | hedge fund building | hedge fund building

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP3R34 Sociology A: Introducing Sociological Concepts and Theories

Description

This Unit is designed to introduce you to sociological concepts and theories. It should involve approximately 40 hours of self-directed study, or roughly 3.5 hours for each of the 12 Subsections of the Study Section. On completion, you should be able to explain the application of basic sociological concepts to developing a sociological analysis of social life and explain the ways in which sociological theories provide a framework for examining one area of social life. On completion of this Unit, you will be able to: 1. Explain the application of basic sociological concepts to developing a sociological analysis of social life. 2. Explain the ways in which sociological theories provide a framework for examining one area of social life.

Subjects

DP3R 34 | C. Wright Mills | sociological imagination | socialisation | Structure versus action | Structural theory | Marx and Engels | consensus theory | Social action theory | Conflict theory | Postmodernism | Lyotard | Foucault and Jameson | DP3R34 | E: Politics/Economics/Law/Social Sciences | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | SCQF Level 7

License

Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Except where expressly indicated otherwise on the face of these materials (i) copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG), and (ii) none of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT) 14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence. This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence.

Subjects

dictatorship | dictatorship | corruption | corruption | economics | economics | political economics | political economics | developmental economics | developmental economics | democracy | democracy | war | war | civil war | civil war | voting | voting | collective action | collective action

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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PE.740 Fencing (MIT) PE.740 Fencing (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to provide students with the fundamentals of fencing, including footwork, bladework, bouting and refereeing. It will allow students to develop the ability to analyze a fencing bout, and promotes creativity in applying acquired skills in a fencing bout. This course is intended to provide students with the fundamentals of fencing, including footwork, bladework, bouting and refereeing. It will allow students to develop the ability to analyze a fencing bout, and promotes creativity in applying acquired skills in a fencing bout.

Subjects

fencing | fencing | en garde | en garde | advance | advance | retreat | retreat | lunge | lunge | footwork | footwork | foil | foil | jump lunge | jump lunge | grip | grip | attack | attack | bladework | bladework | simple thrust | simple thrust | fencing salute | fencing salute | right-of-way | right-of-way | fencing actions | fencing actions | disengagements | disengagements | second intentions | second intentions | feints | feints

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT) 11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | diagrams | reflective practice | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Donald Schon | practice | practice | learning | learning | conceptual innovation | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | cognitive resources | socialization | socialization | externalization | externalization | combination | combination | internalization | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures. This course seeks to provide students with a general understanding of the form of collective action known as the social movement. Our task will be guided by the close examination of several twentieth century social movements in the United States. We will read about the U.S. civil rights, the unemployed workers', welfare rights, pro-choice / pro-life and gay rights movements. We will compare and contrast certain of these movements with their counterparts in other countries. For all, we will identify the reasons for their successes and failures.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | social movements | social movements | comparative | comparative | collective action | collective action | twentieth century | twentieth century | United States | United States | civil rights | civil rights | unemployed workers | unemployed workers | welfare rights | welfare rights | pro-choice | pro-choice | pro-life | pro-life | gay rights | gay rights | success | success | failures. | failures.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.025 Game Theory for Strategic Advantage (MIT) 15.025 Game Theory for Strategic Advantage (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm. This course develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | strategic advantage | strategic advantage | multi-person decision problem | multi-person decision problem | strategies and opponents | strategies and opponents | strategic commitment | strategic commitment | reputation | reputation | "irrational" actions | "irrational" actions | brinkmanship | brinkmanship | negotiation | negotiation | auctions | auctions | market design | market design | contests | contests | long-run relationships | long-run relationships | communication | communication | credibility | credibility | structures | structures | hidden information | hidden information | limits | limits | Preemptive Investment | Preemptive Investment | Audition Game | Audition Game | Location Game | Location Game | Penalty Shots | Penalty Shots | Splitting the Dollar | Splitting the Dollar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT) 21H.225J Gender and the Law in U.S. History (MIT)

Description

This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed. This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Subjects

21H.225 | 21H.225 | WGS.161 | WGS.161 | gender studies | gender studies | suffrage | suffrage | women's rights | women's rights | feminism | feminism | sexual harrassment | sexual harrassment | law | law | women's rights movement | women's rights movement | affirmative action | affirmative action | sexual liberation | sexual liberation | miscegination laws | miscegination laws | social movements | social movements | SP.607J | SP.607J | WMN.607J | WMN.607J | SP.607 | SP.607 | WMN.607 | WMN.607

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Civil Court Action: Purchase of a Horse Scenario

Description

The simulation concerns the alleged non-payment of part of the purchase price of a horse. It is an adversarial transaction where students act either as agents for a client raising the action or a client defending the action from the initial stage up to the Options Hearing stage of the procedure. The students acting for the pursuer are provided with a statement from their client and instructions from a supervisor asking them to raise the action in court. They are given deadlines to meet and provided with style documents to assist them in the process. Once the action has been successfully raised in the court, the defenders are sent the relevant documents plus their client's statement and require to take the necessary steps to defend the action. Students on both sides must follow the correct

Subjects

payment action | ordinary action | court | law | legal practice | scottish civil procedure | ukoer | Law | M000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Civil Court Action: Purchase of a Boat Scenario

Description

The simulation concerns the alleged non-payment of the alleged agreed purchase price of a boat. It is an adversarial transaction where students act either as agents for a client raising the action or a client defending the action from the initial stage up to the Options Hearing stage of the procedure. The students acting for the pursuer are provided with a statement from their client and instructions from a supervisor asking them to raise the action in court. They are given deadlines to meet and provided with style documents to assist them in the process. Once the action has been successfully raised in the court, the defenders are sent the relevant documents plus their client's statement and require to take the necessary steps to defend the action. Students on both sides must follow the c

Subjects

payment action | ordinary action | court | law | legal practice | scottish civil procedure | ukoer | Law | M000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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