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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences. This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | Amartya Sen | directors | directors | film | film | writers | writers | leading parallel film makers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian" | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future. This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | city | suburbs | suburbs | suburban sprawl | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | American metropolis | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | Boston | Boston | industrial cities | industrial cities | housing | housing | workplaces | workplaces | urban planning | urban planning | public spaces | public spaces | performance zoning | performance zoning | land use regulation | land use regulation | urban renewal | urban renewal | American public housing | American public housing | privatization | privatization | New Urbanism | New Urbanism | heritage areas | heritage areas | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | community activism | community activism | urban utopias | urban utopias | development controls | development controls | 11.001 | 11.001 | 4.250 | 4.250

License

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT) 11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT)

Description

In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po

Subjects

natural disaster | natural disaster | environment | environment | risk | risk | risk management | risk management | vulnerability | vulnerability | resilience | resilience | global warming | global warming | rebuilding | rebuilding | risk reduction | risk reduction | nature | nature | hazard | hazard | hazard reduction | hazard reduction | disaster policy | disaster policy | agenda setting | agenda setting | community vulnerability | community vulnerability | climate instability | climate instability | public trust | public trust | reflective practice | reflective practice | resilient cities | resilient cities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT) 11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | the proper relationship between business | government | government | and the public interest | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | CIS | CIS | Asia | Asia | business | business | public interest | public interest | economic growth | economic growth | equity | equity | cities | cities | institution-building | institution-building | institutions | institutions | liberalization | liberalization | privatization | privatization | entrepreneurs | entrepreneurs | private firms | private firms | law | law | property rights | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ancient and Modern Cities

Description

This course will trace the development of cities and urban centers from the Ancient Period through the present era. The student will examine how political, economic, and social institutions influenced the structure of urban centers and shaped the built environment in cities across the world and vice versa. By the end of the course, the student will understand how cities have developed over the past six millennia and better appreciate the dynamic relationship between geography, political and social institutions, and the built environment. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 361)

Subjects

history | ancient cities | modern cities | mesopotamia | egypt | greece | rome | industrial | polis | urbs | medieval | post-industrial | renaissance | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture. This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | contemporary India | film | film | writers | writers | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | nationhood | nationhood | gender and class issues | gender and class issues | rural India | rural India | urban India | urban India | Devdas | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | territory | cities | context | local | national | global | urban settings | city design | social justice | politics of change | urban design | history | theory | territorial settings | urbanites | city dwellers | inhabitants | nestedness | regional | imperial | politics | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT)

Description

In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po

Subjects

natural disaster | environment | risk | risk management | vulnerability | resilience | global warming | rebuilding | risk reduction | nature | hazard | hazard reduction | disaster policy | agenda setting | community vulnerability | climate instability | public trust | reflective practice | resilient cities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | architecture | visual artists | production models | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Post-event Outcomes and the Post-modern Turn: The Olympics and Urban Transformations

Description

The Olympics are analysed from an urban perspective as an event that has an impact on cities beyond sport. The focus of the paper is on post-event outcomes and particularly on Olympic-related facilities and how they are used once the Olympics are over. The 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics serves as the primary illustration of the processes described. The transformation of the urban order is discussed in terms of the post-modern turn and it is shown how the Olympics are affected by and contributes to the support of the shift toward leisure consumption as a dominant theme in the new urban symbolic economy. Issues such as place marketing, urban restructuring, urban regionalization, surveillance, and social exclusion are also related to post-Olympic outcomes.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | globalisation | cities | legacy | sustainability | impact | host city | leisure consumer | social exclusion.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Post-event Outcomes and the Post-modern Turn: The Olympics and Urban Transformations

Description

The Olympics are analysed from an urban perspective as an event that has an impact on cities beyond sport. The focus of the paper is on post-event outcomes and particularly on Olympic-related facilities and how they are used once the Olympics are over. The 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics serves as the primary illustration of the processes described. The transformation of the urban order is discussed in terms of the post-modern turn and it is shown how the Olympics are affected by and contributes to the support of the shift toward leisure consumption as a dominant theme in the new urban symbolic economy. Issues such as place marketing, urban restructuring, urban regionalization, surveillance, and social exclusion are also related to post-Olympic outcomes.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | globalisation | cities | legacy | sustainability | impact | host city | leisure consumer | social exclusion.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | directors | film | writers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | suburbs | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | urban design | urban development | Boston | industrial cities | housing | workplaces | urban planning | public spaces | performance zoning | land use regulation | urban renewal | American public housing | privatization | New Urbanism | heritage areas | environmental regulation | community activism | urban utopias | development controls | 11.001 | 4.250

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual construction based on the concept of defining a personal

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | visual art practice | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | installations | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | field trips | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | modern art | art history | body | phenomenology | personal space | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | architecture | visual artists | production models | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Disaster, Vulnerability and Resilience (MIT)

Description

In recent years, the redistribution of risk has created conditions for natural and technological disasters to become more widespread, more difficult to manage, and more discriminatory in their effects. Policy and planning decision-makers frequently focus on the impact that human settlement patterns, land use decisions, and risky technologies can have on vulnerable populations. However, to ensure safety and promote equity, they also must be familiar with the social and political dynamics that are present at each stage of the disaster management cycle. Therefore, this course will provide students with: An understanding of the breadth of factors that give rise to disaster vulnerability; and A foundation for assessing and managing the social and political processes associated with disaster po

Subjects

natural disaster | environment | risk | risk management | vulnerability | resilience | global warming | rebuilding | risk reduction | nature | hazard | hazard reduction | disaster policy | agenda setting | community vulnerability | climate instability | public trust | reflective practice | resilient cities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.946 Planning in Transition Economies for Growth and Equity (MIT)

Description

During the last fifteen years, nations across the globe embarked on a historic transformation away from centrally planned economies to market-oriented ones. However, in the common pursuit for economic growth, these transition countries implemented widely different reform strategies with mixed results. With over a decade of empirical evidence now available, this new course examines this phenomenon that has pushed the discourse in a number of disciplines, requiring us to reconsider fundamental issues such as: the proper relationship between business, government, and the public interest the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity how economic transition has reshaped cities The premise of the course is that the core issue in transition involves institution-building

Subjects

centrally planned economies | market-oriented economies | transition economies | the proper relationship between business | government | and the public interest | the possible synergies and tensions between economic growth and equity | how economic transition has reshaped cities | institution-building and re-building in different contexts | Eastern Europe | CIS | Asia | business | public interest | economic growth | equity | cities | institution-building | institutions | liberalization | privatization | entrepreneurs | private firms | law | property rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | ethnic | religious | racial | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | inequality | social injustice | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | policymaking | democratic participation | citizenship | spatial | infrastructural | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democratic | territory | territorial | participation | policy | theoretical | practical | identity | conflict | social | political | theories | regional | transnational | levels of determination | institutional | technological | interventions | city | difference | diversity | equality | class | cities | nations | legal | jurisdiction | peace | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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