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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT) 1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets. This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets.

Subjects

management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | management | construction | construction | engineering | engineering | architecture | architecture | global markets | global markets | concessions | concessions | partnering | partnering | finance | finance | privatization | privatization | outsourcing | outsourcing | information technology | information technology | international | international | globalization | globalization | greatest construction projects | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | Mexican road privatization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.021J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 15.021J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects | neighborhood effects | neighborhood effects | 15.021 | 15.021 | 11.433 | 11.433

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT) 24.946 Linguistic Theory and the Japanese Language (MIT)

Description

This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory. This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory.

Subjects

Linguistics | Linguistics | Linguistic Theory | Linguistic Theory | Japanese | Japanese | Language | Language | theoretical linguistics | theoretical linguistics | A-positions | A-positions | A-chains | A-chains | A'-positions | A'-positions | A'-chains | A'-chains | Double-object construction | Double-object construction | Possessor raising | Possessor raising | locational verbs | locational verbs | Binding | Binding | External argument | External argument | causative construction | causative construction | reconstruction | reconstruction | word-order permutation | word-order permutation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | property | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | market cycles | land markets | demographic trends | transportation | government regulation | real estate market | demographic analysis | regional growth | residential construction | new home building | commercial construction | retail stores | urban location theory | predicting demand | modeling techniques | urban economics | land use | urban growth | residential development | gentrification | zoning | property taxes | neighboorhood effects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets.

Subjects

management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender | gender | transsexual | transsexual | women's movement | women's movement | women's rights | women's rights | declaration of independence | declaration of independence | madness | madness | illness | illness | patriarchy | patriarchy | female pathology | female pathology | socialization | socialization | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | gender roles | gender roles | social construction | social construction | biological essentialism | biological essentialism | embodiment | embodiment | body image | body image | representation of women | representation of women | sexuality | sexuality | reproductive politics | reproductive politics | work | work | violence | violence | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.500 Introduction to Design Computing (MIT) 4.500 Introduction to Design Computing (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to architectural design and computation through the use of computer modeling, rendering, and digital fabrication. The focus is on the exploration of space and place-making through the use of computer rendering and design construction and fabrication. Students design a small building using computer models leading to a full package of physical and virtual materials, from computer generated drawings to rapid, prototyped models. This course introduces students to architectural design and computation through the use of computer modeling, rendering, and digital fabrication. The focus is on the exploration of space and place-making through the use of computer rendering and design construction and fabrication. Students design a small building using computer models leading to a full package of physical and virtual materials, from computer generated drawings to rapid, prototyped models.

Subjects

architectural design and computation | architectural design and computation | computer modeling | computer modeling | rendering | rendering | digital fabrication | digital fabrication | exploration of space | exploration of space | place making | place making | computer rendering | computer rendering | design construction | design construction | CAD CAM fabrication | CAD CAM fabrication | computer models | computer models | computer aided drawings | computer aided drawings | rapid prototyped models | rapid prototyped models | architecture | architecture | design | design | computation | computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT) 4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introductory subject in advanced computing, rapid prototyping, and CAD/CAM fabrication for architects. It focuses on the relationship between design and various forms of computer modeling as input, and CAD/CAM tools as output material. It presents the process of design and construction using CAD files introduced by the office of Gehry Partners during the construction of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. It is taught in phases starting with rapid prototyping and ending with digital mockups of building components fabricated from CAD files on a one-to-one scale. This class serves as an introductory subject in advanced computing, rapid prototyping, and CAD/CAM fabrication for architects. It focuses on the relationship between design and various forms of computer modeling as input, and CAD/CAM tools as output material. It presents the process of design and construction using CAD files introduced by the office of Gehry Partners during the construction of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. It is taught in phases starting with rapid prototyping and ending with digital mockups of building components fabricated from CAD files on a one-to-one scale.

Subjects

architectural design and computation | architectural design and computation | computer modeling | computer modeling | rendering | rendering | digital fabrication | digital fabrication | exploration of space | exploration of space | place making | place making | computer rendering | computer rendering | design construction | design construction | CAD/CAM fabrication | CAD/CAM fabrication | computer models | computer models | computer aided drawings | computer aided drawings | rapid prototyped models | rapid prototyped models | architecture | architecture | design | design | computation | computation | CAD CAM fabrication | CAD CAM fabrication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.206 Introduction to Design Computing (MIT) 4.206 Introduction to Design Computing (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce students to architectural design and computation through the use of computer modeling, rendering and digital fabrication. The course focuses on teaching architectural design with CAD drawing, modeling, rendering and rapid prototyping. Students will be required to build computer models that will lead to a full package of architectural explorations within a computational environment. Each semester will explore a particular historical period in architecture and the work of a selected architect. This course will introduce students to architectural design and computation through the use of computer modeling, rendering and digital fabrication. The course focuses on teaching architectural design with CAD drawing, modeling, rendering and rapid prototyping. Students will be required to build computer models that will lead to a full package of architectural explorations within a computational environment. Each semester will explore a particular historical period in architecture and the work of a selected architect.

Subjects

architectural design and computation | architectural design and computation | computer modeling | computer modeling | rendering | rendering | digital fabrication | digital fabrication | exploration of space | exploration of space | place making | place making | computer rendering | computer rendering | design construction | design construction | CAD CAM fabrication | CAD CAM fabrication | computer models | computer models | computer aided drawings | computer aided drawings | rapid prototyped models | rapid prototyped models | architecture | architecture | design | design | computation | computation | representational mediums | representational mediums | architectural design | architectural design | complex phenomena | complex phenomena | constructs | constructs | information visualization | information visualization | programming | programming | computer graphics | computer graphics | data respresentation | data respresentation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.212 Design Fabrication (MIT) 4.212 Design Fabrication (MIT)

Description

Design Fabrication is an introductory course in the field of advanced computing, prototyping and building fabrication. The class is focused on the relationship between design, various forms of computer modeling both explicit and generative and the physical representation of information using rapid prototyping devices. Design Fabrication is an introductory course in the field of advanced computing, prototyping and building fabrication. The class is focused on the relationship between design, various forms of computer modeling both explicit and generative and the physical representation of information using rapid prototyping devices.

Subjects

architectural design and computation | architectural design and computation | computer modeling | computer modeling | rendering | rendering | digital fabrication | digital fabrication | exploration of space | exploration of space | place making | place making | computer rendering | computer rendering | design construction | design construction | CAD CAM fabrication | CAD CAM fabrication | computer models | computer models | computer aided drawings | computer aided drawings | rapid prototyped models | rapid prototyped models | architecture | architecture | design | design | computation | computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT) 1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

1.133 is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (M. Eng.) program. It features lectures presented by a variety of industry and academic speakers. The course is designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and to expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communications, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevent large scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. Course lectures are integrated with a weekly seminar series and the MEng group project subjects which are mentioned herein.  1.133 is a core requirement for the Master of Engineering (M. Eng.) program. It features lectures presented by a variety of industry and academic speakers. The course is designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and to expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communications, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevent large scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. Course lectures are integrated with a weekly seminar series and the MEng group project subjects which are mentioned herein. 

Subjects

professional engineer | professional engineer | team-building skills | team-building skills | lectures | lectures | team workshops | team workshops | seminars | seminars | written communication | written communication | oral communication | oral communication | job placement skills | job placement skills | trends in the engineering | trends in the engineering | trends in construction industry | trends in construction industry | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | managing public information | managing public information | proposal preparation | proposal preparation | project evaluation | project evaluation | project management | project management | liability | liability | professional ethics | professional ethics | negotiation | negotiation | construction industry | construction industry | engineering | engineering | resume writing | resume writing | technical writing | technical writing | job placement interviews | job placement interviews | alternative dispute resolution | alternative dispute resolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.007J Feminist Political Thought (MIT) 17.007J Feminist Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as a focused survey of feminist political thought and theory, exploring the various and often competing ways feminists have framed discussions about sex, gender, and oppression. Beginning with a consideration of key terms (sex, gender, oppression) and the meaning of social construction, we will move on to study three central feminist approaches to political thought (humanism, gynocentrism, and dominance). The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in feminist theory, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. This course is designed as a focused survey of feminist political thought and theory, exploring the various and often competing ways feminists have framed discussions about sex, gender, and oppression. Beginning with a consideration of key terms (sex, gender, oppression) and the meaning of social construction, we will move on to study three central feminist approaches to political thought (humanism, gynocentrism, and dominance). The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in feminist theory, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | politics | politics | social construction | social construction | political thought | political thought | humanist | humanist | gynocentric | gynocentric | dominance | dominance | feminist theory | feminist theory | 17.007 | 17.007 | SP.601 | SP.601

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.440 Basic Structural Design (MIT) 4.440 Basic Structural Design (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of structural analysis and design for buildings, bridges and other structures. The course emphasizes the historical development of structural form and the evolution of structural design knowledge, from Gothic cathedrals to long span suspension bridges. Students will investigate the behavior of structural systems and elements through design exercises, case studies, and load testing of models. Students will design structures using timber, masonry, steel, and concrete and will gain an appreciation of the importance of structural design today, with an emphasis on environmental impact of large scale construction. This course provides students with a basic knowledge of structural analysis and design for buildings, bridges and other structures. The course emphasizes the historical development of structural form and the evolution of structural design knowledge, from Gothic cathedrals to long span suspension bridges. Students will investigate the behavior of structural systems and elements through design exercises, case studies, and load testing of models. Students will design structures using timber, masonry, steel, and concrete and will gain an appreciation of the importance of structural design today, with an emphasis on environmental impact of large scale construction.

Subjects

structural analysis | structural analysis | structural design | structural design | historical structures | historical structures | environment | environment | sustainable construction | sustainable construction | graphical analysis | graphical analysis | environmental assessment | environmental assessment | beam | beam | column | column | truss | truss | frame | frame | arch | arch | structural systems | structural systems | model building | model building | design exercises | design exercises | compression | compression | tension | tension | axial forces | axial forces | structural failures | structural failures | timber | timber | steel | steel | concrete | concrete | sustainable structures | sustainable structures

License

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4.406 Ecologies of Construction (MIT) 4.406 Ecologies of Construction (MIT)

Description

Ecologies of Construction examines the resource requirements for the making and maintenance of the contemporary built environment. This course introduces the field of industrial ecology as a primary source of concepts and methods in the mapping of material and energy expenditures dedicated to construction activities. Ecologies of Construction examines the resource requirements for the making and maintenance of the contemporary built environment. This course introduces the field of industrial ecology as a primary source of concepts and methods in the mapping of material and energy expenditures dedicated to construction activities.

Subjects

ecologies of construction | ecologies of construction | material and energy networks | material and energy networks | natural world | natural world | built environments | built environments | architectural artifact | architectural artifact | spatial and temporal scales and boundaries | spatial and temporal scales and boundaries

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.296 Furniture Making (MIT) 4.296 Furniture Making (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Furniture making is in many ways like bridge building, connections holding posts apart with spans to support a deck. Many architects have tried their hand at furniture design, Wright, Mies Van Der Rohe, Aalto, Saarinen, Le Corbusier, and Gerhy. We will review the history of furniture making in America with a visit to the Decorative Arts Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and have Cambridge artist/craftsman Mitch Ryerson show us his work and talk about design process. Students will learn traditional woodworking techniques beginning with the use of hand tools, power tools and finally woodworking machines. Students will build a single piece of furniture of an original design that must support someone weighing 185 lbs. sittin Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. Furniture making is in many ways like bridge building, connections holding posts apart with spans to support a deck. Many architects have tried their hand at furniture design, Wright, Mies Van Der Rohe, Aalto, Saarinen, Le Corbusier, and Gerhy. We will review the history of furniture making in America with a visit to the Decorative Arts Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and have Cambridge artist/craftsman Mitch Ryerson show us his work and talk about design process. Students will learn traditional woodworking techniques beginning with the use of hand tools, power tools and finally woodworking machines. Students will build a single piece of furniture of an original design that must support someone weighing 185 lbs. sittin

Subjects

construction | construction | design | design | furniture | furniture | arts and crafts | arts and crafts | bauhaus | bauhaus | japanese design | japanese design | chinese design | chinese design | quakers | quakers | shakers | shakers | american construction | american construction | stick style | stick style | structures | structures | woodworking | woodworking | wood properties | wood properties

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.463J The Impact of Globalization on the Built Environment (MIT) 1.463J The Impact of Globalization on the Built Environment (MIT)

Description

The course is designed to provide a better understanding of the built environment, globalization, the current financial crisis and the impact of these factors on the rapidly changing and evolving international architecture, engineering, construction fields. We will, hopefully, obtain a better understanding of how these forces of globalization and the current financial crisis are having an impact on the built environment and how they will affect firms and your future career opportunities. We will also identify, review and discuss best practices and lessons that can be learned from recent events. We will explore the "international built environment" in detail, examining how it functions and asking what are the managerial, entrepreneurial and professional opportunities, challenges a The course is designed to provide a better understanding of the built environment, globalization, the current financial crisis and the impact of these factors on the rapidly changing and evolving international architecture, engineering, construction fields. We will, hopefully, obtain a better understanding of how these forces of globalization and the current financial crisis are having an impact on the built environment and how they will affect firms and your future career opportunities. We will also identify, review and discuss best practices and lessons that can be learned from recent events. We will explore the "international built environment" in detail, examining how it functions and asking what are the managerial, entrepreneurial and professional opportunities, challenges a

Subjects

1.463 | 1.463 | 11.342 | 11.342 | ESD.53 | ESD.53 | management | management | construction | construction | engineering | engineering | architecture | architecture | global markets | global markets | concessions | concessions | partnering | partnering | finance | finance | privatization | privatization | outsourcing | outsourcing | information technology | information technology | international | international | globalization | globalization | greatest construction projects | greatest construction projects | project delivery system | project delivery system | risk management | risk management | megacities | megacities | competitiveness | competitiveness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT) 1.133 Masters of Engineering Concepts of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject. This course is a core requirement for the Masters in Engineering program, designed to teach students about the roles of today's professional engineer and expose them to team-building skills through lectures, team workshops, and seminars. Topics include: written and oral communication, job placement skills, trends in the engineering and construction industry, risk analysis and risk management, managing public information, proposal preparation, project evaluation, project management, liability, professional ethics, and negotiation. The course draws on relevant large-scale projects to illustrate each component of the subject.

Subjects

professional engineer | professional engineer | team-building skills | team-building skills | lectures | lectures | team workshops | team workshops | seminars | seminars | written communication | written communication | oral communication | oral communication | job placement skills | job placement skills | trends in engineering | trends in engineering | trends in construction industry | trends in construction industry | risk analysis | risk analysis | risk management | risk management | proposal preparation | proposal preparation | request for proposal | request for proposal | small business | small business | professional registration | professional registration | project evaluation | project evaluation | project management | project management | liability | liability | professional ethics | professional ethics | negotiation | negotiation

License

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1.364 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (MIT) 1.364 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (MIT)

Description

1.364 examines site characterization and geotechnical aspects of the design and construction of foundation systems. Topics include: site investigation (with emphasis on in situ testing), shallow (footings and raftings) and deep (piles and caissons) foundations, excavation support systems, groundwater control, slope stability, soil improvement (compaction, soil reinforcement, etc.), and construction monitoring. This course is a core requirement for the Geotechnical Master of Engineering program at MIT. 1.364 examines site characterization and geotechnical aspects of the design and construction of foundation systems. Topics include: site investigation (with emphasis on in situ testing), shallow (footings and raftings) and deep (piles and caissons) foundations, excavation support systems, groundwater control, slope stability, soil improvement (compaction, soil reinforcement, etc.), and construction monitoring. This course is a core requirement for the Geotechnical Master of Engineering program at MIT.

Subjects

geotechnical engineering | geotechnical engineering | soil | soil | soil mechanics | soil mechanics | foundations | foundations | earth retaining structures | earth retaining structures | site investigation | site investigation | ultimate limit | ultimate limit | serviceability limit | serviceability limit | soil improvement | soil improvement | gravity walls | gravity walls | composite construction | composite construction | reinforced earth | reinforced earth | structural support | structural support | excavations | excavations | bracing | bracing | tieback anchors | tieback anchors | tiebacks | tiebacks | safety factors | safety factors | boreholes | boreholes | soil sampling | soil sampling | stratigraphy | stratigraphy | SPT | SPT | FV | FV | PCPT | PCPT | spread foundation design | spread foundation design | in situ tests | in situ tests | bearing capacity | bearing capacity | strength parameters | strength parameters | allowable settlements | allowable settlements | sand | sand | clay | clay | soil-structure interaction | soil-structure interaction | pile types | pile types | pile selection | pile selection | pile behavior | pile behavior | pile capacity | pile capacity | pile driving | pile driving | pile load tests | pile load tests | slope stability | slope stability | cantilevers | cantilevers | propper walls | propper walls | braced excavations | braced excavations | reinforced soil | reinforced soil | soil nailing | soil nailing | geosynthetic reinforcement | geosynthetic reinforcement

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.670 Mechanical Engineering Tools (MIT) 2.670 Mechanical Engineering Tools (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Instruction given on MATLAB®, MAPLE®, XESS™, and CAD. Emphasis is on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring the major in Mechanical Engineering. This course was co-created by Prof. Douglas Hart and Dr. Kevin Otto. This course introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Instruction given on MATLAB®, MAPLE®, XESS™, and CAD. Emphasis is on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring the major in Mechanical Engineering. This course was co-created by Prof. Douglas Hart and Dr. Kevin Otto.

Subjects

fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use | fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use | bandsaw | bandsaw | milling machine | milling machine | lathe | lathe | MATLAB | MATLAB | MAPLE | MAPLE | XESS | XESS | CAD | CAD | problem solving | problem solving | project-oriented | project-oriented | machine tool use | machine tool use | computer tool use | computer tool use | mechanical engineering projects | mechanical engineering projects | Inter Activities Period | Inter Activities Period | IAP | IAP | engine design | engine design | engine construction | engine construction | Stirling engines | Stirling engines

License

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6.877J Computational Evolutionary Biology (MIT) 6.877J Computational Evolutionary Biology (MIT)

Description

Why has it been easier to develop a vaccine to eliminate polio than to control influenza or AIDS? Has there been natural selection for a 'language gene'? Why are there no animals with wheels? When does 'maximizing fitness' lead to evolutionary extinction? How are sex and parasites related? Why don't snakes eat grass? Why don't we have eyes in the back of our heads? How does modern genomics illustrate and challenge the field? This course analyzes evolution from a computational, modeling, and engineering perspective. The course has extensive hands-on laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data. Why has it been easier to develop a vaccine to eliminate polio than to control influenza or AIDS? Has there been natural selection for a 'language gene'? Why are there no animals with wheels? When does 'maximizing fitness' lead to evolutionary extinction? How are sex and parasites related? Why don't snakes eat grass? Why don't we have eyes in the back of our heads? How does modern genomics illustrate and challenge the field? This course analyzes evolution from a computational, modeling, and engineering perspective. The course has extensive hands-on laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data.

Subjects

6.877 | 6.877 | HST.949 | HST.949 | computational approaches | computational approaches | evolutionary biology | evolutionary biology | evolutionary theory and inferential logic of evolution by natural selection | evolutionary theory and inferential logic of evolution by natural selection | computational and algorithmic implications and requirements of evolutionary models | computational and algorithmic implications and requirements of evolutionary models | whole-genome species comparison | whole-genome species comparison | phylogenetic tree construction | phylogenetic tree construction | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | homology and development | homology and development | optimization and evolvability | optimization and evolvability | heritability | heritability | disease evolution | disease evolution | detecting selection in human populations | and evolution of language | detecting selection in human populations | and evolution of language | extensive laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data | extensive laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data

License

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20.180 Biological Engineering Programming (MIT) 20.180 Biological Engineering Programming (MIT)

Description

In this course problems from biological engineering are used to develop structured computer programming skills and explore the theory and practice of complex systems design and construction. The official course Web site can be viewed at: BE.180 Biological Engineering Programming. In this course problems from biological engineering are used to develop structured computer programming skills and explore the theory and practice of complex systems design and construction. The official course Web site can be viewed at: BE.180 Biological Engineering Programming.

Subjects

biological engineering problems | biological engineering problems | structured computer programming skills | structured computer programming skills | theory and practice of complex systems design | theory and practice of complex systems design | theory and design of complex systems construction | theory and design of complex systems construction

License

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21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT) 21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT)

Description

This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture. This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | war | war | peace | peace | f humans are by nature warlike | f humans are by nature warlike | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | sociobiological and other theories of war | sociobiological and other theories of war | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | Bosnia | Bosnia | and Northern Ireland | and Northern Ireland | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | peace movements | peace movements | studies of military conversion | studies of military conversion | Northern Ireland | Northern Ireland | humans are by nature warlike | humans are by nature warlike

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Masterworks in American Short Fiction (MIT) 21L.705 Masterworks in American Short Fiction (MIT)

Description

For some reason, American literature (like French, Irish, and Russian, among others) has been especially productive in major works in fictional forms shorter than the novel. Our task in this course will be to survey that field, by looking at particular moments of high accomplishment. We will, in addition, consider some of the ways in which literary formulae can be used and varied, and some of the impacts of elements of narrative construction. For some reason, American literature (like French, Irish, and Russian, among others) has been especially productive in major works in fictional forms shorter than the novel. Our task in this course will be to survey that field, by looking at particular moments of high accomplishment. We will, in addition, consider some of the ways in which literary formulae can be used and varied, and some of the impacts of elements of narrative construction.

Subjects

American | American | short fiction | short fiction | story-telling | story-telling | narrative construction | narrative construction | Hemingway | Hemingway | James | James | Welty | Welty | Hammett | Hammett | Alvarez | Alvarez | Diaz | Diaz | Cather | Cather | Huston | Huston

License

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24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT) 24.910 Topics in Linguistics Theory (MIT)

Description

I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big I realize that "Modes of Assertion" is a rather cryptic title for the course. What we will explore are ways of modulating the force of an assertion. This will engage us in formal semantics and pragmatics, the theory of speech acts and performative utterances, and quite a bit of empirical work on a not-too-well understood complex of data. "It is obvious that he made a big mistake." If you're like me you didn't feel much of a difference. But now see what happens when you embed the two sentences: "We have to fire him, because he obviously made a big mistake." "We have to fire him, because it is obvious that he made a big mistake." One of the two examples is unremarkable, the other suggests that the reason he needs to be fired is not that he made a big

Subjects

linguistic theory | linguistic theory | semantics | semantics | typology | typology | preformatics | preformatics | modality | modality | evidentiality | evidentiality | embedded assertions | embedded assertions | modes of assertion | modes of assertion | modulation | modulation | force | force | formal semantics | formal semantics | pragmatics | pragmatics | speech acts | speech acts | performative utterances | performative utterances | language constructions | language constructions | English | English | German | German | Quechua | Quechua | Tibetan | Tibetan | evidentiality marking | evidentiality marking | epistemic modality | epistemic modality | performatives | performatives | evidentials | evidentials | direct evidentiality | direct evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | indirect evidentiality | conditionals | conditionals | Faller?s ideas | Faller?s ideas | best possible grounds | best possible grounds

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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