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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT) 14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements. This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements.

Subjects

empirical economics | empirical economics | econometrics | econometrics | mathematical economics | mathematical economics | statistics | statistics | Economics | Economics | research | research | communication | communication | hypotheses | hypotheses | data | data | analysis | analysis | results | results | STATA | STATA | data sets | data sets | writing | writing

License

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14.581 International Economics I (MIT) 14.581 International Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | nternational trade | nternational trade | foreign investment | foreign investment | commercial policy | commercial policy | Ricardian models | Ricardian models | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Eaton and Kortum's Ricardian Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | Generalized Heckscher-Ohlin Model | empirical tests | empirical tests | intermediate input trade | intermediate input trade | wage inequality | wage inequality | external scale economics | external scale economics | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | intraindustry heterogeneity | intraindustry heterogeneity | technological theories of FDI | technological theories of FDI | transaction-cost approach | transaction-cost approach | property-rights approach | property-rights approach | dynamic trade theory | dynamic trade theory | neoclassical growth | neoclassical growth | technology and growth | technology and growth | innovation | innovation | technology transfer | technology transfer | product cycles | product cycles | tariff retaliation | tariff retaliation | WTO | WTO | regionalism | regionalism | multilateralism | multilateralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT) 14.33 Economics Research and Communication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements. This course will guide students through the process of forming economic hypotheses, gathering the appropriate data, analyzing them, and effectively communicating their results. All students will be expected to have successfully completed Introduction to Statistical Methods in Economics and Econometrics (or their equivalents) as well as courses in basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students may find it useful to take at least one economics field course and perform a UROP before taking this course, but these are not requirements.

Subjects

empirical economics | empirical economics | econometrics | econometrics | mathematical economics | mathematical economics | statistics | statistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT) Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT)

Description

Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation. Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation.

Subjects

cost | cost | value | value | cash flow | cash flow | discount | discount | life-cycle | life-cycle | engineering economics | engineering economics | manufacturing economics | manufacturing economics | LCA | LCA | life-cycle assessment | life-cycle assessment | PCBM | PCBM | process-based cost modeling | process-based cost modeling | cost model | cost model | environmental impact | environmental impact | uncertainty | uncertainty | consumption | consumption | efficiency | efficiency | waste | waste | Ashby | Ashby

License

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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects

License

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11.957 Frameworks of Urban Governance (MIT) 11.957 Frameworks of Urban Governance (MIT)

Description

Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education…). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class. Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education…). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class.

Subjects

physical development | physical development | urban sector | urban sector | urban politics | urban politics | immigration | immigration | education | education | economics | economics | environment | environment | public finance | public finance | environmental economics | environmental economics | research | research | causation | causation | pigovian taxes | pigovian taxes | coasian | coasian | bost-benefit analysis | bost-benefit analysis | public economics | public economics | hedonic method | hedonic method | valuation | valuation | housing | housing | health effects | health effects | dose-response | dose-response | avoidance | avoidance | household production function | household production function | locational equilibrium | locational equilibrium | policy | policy | regulations | regulations | double dividend | double dividend | climate change | climate change | development | development | markets | markets | labor | labor | workplace | workplace | safety | safety | advertising | advertising | traffic | traffic

License

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14.475 Environmental Economics and Government Responses to Market Failure (MIT) 14.475 Environmental Economics and Government Responses to Market Failure (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theory behind and evidence on regulatory, tax, and other government responses to problems of market failure. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts. This course explores the theory behind and evidence on regulatory, tax, and other government responses to problems of market failure. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts.

Subjects

economics | economics | environment | environment | public finance | public finance | environmental economics | environmental economics | research | research | causation | causation | pigovian taxes | pigovian taxes | coasian | coasian | bost-benefit analysis | bost-benefit analysis | public economics | public economics | hedonic method | hedonic method | valuation | valuation | housing | housing | health effects | health effects | dose-response | dose-response | avoidance | avoidance | household production function | household production function | locational equilibrium | locational equilibrium | policy | policy | regulations | regulations | double dividend | double dividend | climate change | climate change | development | development | markets | markets | labor | labor | workplace | workplace | safety | safety | advertising | advertising | traffic | traffic

License

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15.676 Work, Employment, and Industrial Relations Theory (MIT) 15.676 Work, Employment, and Industrial Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar will cover the multi-disciplinary theoretical and empirical foundations of research on work, employment, labor markets, and industrial relations. We begin by tracing the historical development of theory and research in the field, paying special attention to how the normative premises, concepts, and methodological traditions of industrial relations compare to those of other disciplines that contribute to the study of work and employment relations. Then we will review a number of current theoretical and policy debates shaping the field. This will be followed by a series of modules introducing different disciplinary perspectives used to study work and employment issues today. Emphasis will be given to recent research from different industries that illustrate the mix of methods&md This seminar will cover the multi-disciplinary theoretical and empirical foundations of research on work, employment, labor markets, and industrial relations. We begin by tracing the historical development of theory and research in the field, paying special attention to how the normative premises, concepts, and methodological traditions of industrial relations compare to those of other disciplines that contribute to the study of work and employment relations. Then we will review a number of current theoretical and policy debates shaping the field. This will be followed by a series of modules introducing different disciplinary perspectives used to study work and employment issues today. Emphasis will be given to recent research from different industries that illustrate the mix of methods&md

Subjects

labor markets | labor markets | neo-classical labor economics | neo-classical labor economics | institutional labor economics | institutional labor economics | human resource management | human resource management | negotiations theory | negotiations theory | employment relations | employment relations | collective bargaining | collective bargaining | institutional labor market | institutional labor market | internal labor market | internal labor market

License

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

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15.521 Management Accounting and Control (MIT) 15.521 Management Accounting and Control (MIT)

Description

This course examines management accounting and related analytical methodologies for decision making and control in profit-directed organizations. It also defines product costing, budgetary control systems, and performance evaluation systems for planning, coordinating, and monitoring the performance of a business. This course defines principles of measurement and develops framework for assessing behavioral dimensions of control systems; impact of different managerial styles on motivation and performance in an organization. This course examines management accounting and related analytical methodologies for decision making and control in profit-directed organizations. It also defines product costing, budgetary control systems, and performance evaluation systems for planning, coordinating, and monitoring the performance of a business. This course defines principles of measurement and develops framework for assessing behavioral dimensions of control systems; impact of different managerial styles on motivation and performance in an organization.

Subjects

management | management | accounting | accounting | accounting information | accounting information | organizational economics | organizational economics | managerial economics | managerial economics | internal accounting systems | internal accounting systems

License

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | environment | environment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT) 14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence. This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence.

Subjects

dictatorship | dictatorship | corruption | corruption | economics | economics | political economics | political economics | developmental economics | developmental economics | democracy | democracy | war | war | civil war | civil war | voting | voting | collective action | collective action

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | enviroment | enviroment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

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1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT) 1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT)

Description

1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation; resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems; and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infras 1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: basic techniques of engineering economics including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation; resource and cost estimation procedures appropriate for large-scale infrastructure systems; and incorporating service quality, risk, environmental impacts, and other factors within the evaluation process. Examples are drawn from building design and construction, transportation systems, urban development, environmental projects, water resource management, and other elements of both the public and private infras

Subjects

civil engineering project | civil engineering project | engineering economics | engineering economics | net present value | net present value | life-cycle costing | life-cycle costing | benefit-cost analysis | benefit-cost analysis | project evaluation | project evaluation | cost estimation | cost estimation | large-scale infrastructure | large-scale infrastructure | building design | building design | construction | construction | transportation systems | transportation systems | urban development | urban development | environmental projects | environmental projects | water resource management | water resource management

License

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14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT) 14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? Students will help design and execute a cutting edge research project that tests whether air pollution causes infant mortality. To gain real world experience, the course will include a guest lecture from a former EPA plant inspector and is tentatively scheduled to include a visit to a local polluting plant. This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? Students will help design and execute a cutting edge research project that tests whether air pollution causes infant mortality. To gain real world experience, the course will include a guest lecture from a former EPA plant inspector and is tentatively scheduled to include a visit to a local polluting plant.

Subjects

economics | economics | policy | policy | environment | environment | environmental economics | environmental economics | public policy | public policy | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | resource management | resource management | government | government | safety | safety | health | health | regulation | regulation | sustainability | sustainability | public goods | public goods | pollution | pollution | taxes | taxes | green | green | risk | risk | liability | liability | industry | industry | kuznets curves | kuznets curves | trade | trade | competition | competition | growth | growth | double dividend | double dividend | accounting | accounting | hedonic | hedonic | valuation | valuation | global warming | global warming | cost | cost

License

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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT) HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)

Description

This course will show how information technologies (IT) shape and redefine the health care marketplace. Students will learn how IT enhances medical care through: 1) improved economies of scale, 2) greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care, 3) advanced tools for patient education and self-care, 4) network-integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and 5) opportunities for e-health delivery over the internet. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to design an innovative solution to a current or future health care problem. Students' proposed solutions will draw upon understanding of tools and principles acquired and will be presented as an application design during the final days of the course. Adjunct Faculty Mirena Bagur Sherri Dorfman Paul Heinzelman Gary H This course will show how information technologies (IT) shape and redefine the health care marketplace. Students will learn how IT enhances medical care through: 1) improved economies of scale, 2) greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care, 3) advanced tools for patient education and self-care, 4) network-integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and 5) opportunities for e-health delivery over the internet. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to design an innovative solution to a current or future health care problem. Students' proposed solutions will draw upon understanding of tools and principles acquired and will be presented as an application design during the final days of the course. Adjunct Faculty Mirena Bagur Sherri Dorfman Paul Heinzelman Gary H

Subjects

information technology | information technology | health care system | health care system | economy of scale | economy of scale | technical efficiency | technical efficiency | patient education | patient education | self-care | self-care | network integration | network integration | decision support tool | decision support tool | internet | internet | web | web | disease managment | disease managment | health economics | health economics | clinical effectiveness | clinical effectiveness | trials design | trials design | software | software

License

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