Searching for event management : 12 results found | RSS Feed for this search

How we won the Bid

Description

For the British people, Wednesday 6th July, 2005, was a momentous and historic day. That was the day that Britain was awarded the right to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Such an announcement transformed the image of Britain as a nation capable of hosting large scale sporting mega-events.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | discussion starter | discuss | Winning bid | mega event | event management | politicians | media | media management | legacy | volunteers | oxb:060111:010dd | hospitality | leisure | sport | tourism | Team GB | The Olympics Governance Management.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"Amoral universalism": mediating and staging global and local in the 1998 Nagano Olympic Winter Games

Description

This paper is a case study that critically analyzes the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympic Games. The Olympics are a gigantic global event, largely as a result of significant global media attention, particularly through television and corporate sponsors. However, these entities simultaneously need a specific locale in which to operate. Analytically, the paper focuses on interactions between the global media actors and the host city and its people. It argues that the commercialized nature of the Olympic Games controls not only the program, but also numerous aspects of the local host city to maximize benefit for the media. This paper reviews how historically and structurally the media were able to obtain such extensive control. Then, it argues how the media actually control the locale through the in

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | broadcasting | 1998 Winter Games | mega event | event management | politicians | media | media management | legacy | television | culture.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Mapping the Olympic growth machine

Description

Theories of growth machines and urban regimes have informed the study of urban political economy for more than three decades, but these theories remain focused on intra-urban processes. Using a case study of the bidding process and the planning of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, we explore the transnational dimensions of the urban growth machine and explore common aspects between the growth machine and regime theory literature and the literatures on the entrepreneurial city and transnational urban policy transfers. Through its evolving networks with other urban regimes, Vancouver's growth machine provides a ready forum in which local elites can acquire specialized knowledge on new urban entrepreneurial strategies elsewhere. Actors situated in different parts of the local growt

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Vancouver 2010 | bidding process | event management | urbanisation | urban environment | architecture | urban development | politics | planning | regeneration | city marketing.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Perceptions of Terrorism Threats at the 2004 Olympic Games: Implications for Sport Events

Description

Keltner, 2001), we investigated effects of anger and fear on risk judgments of 277 attendees at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Attendees who reported being fearful or feeling unsafe at the Games displayed increased risk estimates and associated concerns, whilst respondents expressing defiance and anger produced opposite reactions. Male respondents had less pessimistic risk perceptions than did females, and men were more likely than women to report that the increased security measures detracted from their Olympic Games experience. Nationality had minimal effect on perceptions of risk except in the case of the host country, with Greek respondents reporting fewer concerns for safety but greater awareness of the security measures present at the Games. The discussion focuses on theoretical, methodol

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Terrorism | Risk | Sport Events | threats | security | Munich 1972 | Munich Massacre | black September | extremists | terrorists | terrorist attacks | anti-terror | violence | protest | disruption | safety | event management.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Olympic Games: Twenty-First Century challenges as a global Media Event

Description

The age of the television introduced us to the media event. Media events are a unique media genre that results when televsion's visual and narrative power taps intopublic facination with a story that transcends daily experence.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | media | media management | legacy | television | culture | mega event | event management | broadcasting | culture | sports broadcasting | advertising | marketing | commercialisation | Olympic movement | doping | bribery |

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Public diplomacy games: a comparative study of American and Japanese responses to the interplay of nationalism, ideology and Chinese soft power strategies around the 2008 Beijing Olympics

Description

The Olympic Games are global communication events that offer host-nations the unique opportunity to promote a soft power agenda by allowing them to construct global messages about their cultural identities and work towards public diplomacy goals that may be more difficult to achieve under normal circumstances. At the same time, however, the Olympics accentuate nationalist and patriotic sentiment, especially in host-nations. Nationalist conviction must be conceptually differentiated from support for the national government. Indeed, we suggest that one of the tasks of governments of Olympic host cities is to manage strong nationalist emotions in order that they support the public diplomacy efforts associated with the Olympic Games. In this paper, American and Japanese media responses to the

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | politics | diplomacy | cultural identity | broadcasting | propaganda | Beijing 2008 | nationalism | mega-event | event management | media | television | Human Rights | NGO | OPHR | Olympic Torch relay | Sichuan earthquake | protest.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Public diplomacy games: a comparative study of American and Japanese responses to the interplay of nationalism, ideology and Chinese soft power strategies around the 2008 Beijing Olympics

Description

The Olympic Games are global communication events that offer host-nations the unique opportunity to promote a soft power agenda by allowing them to construct global messages about their cultural identities and work towards public diplomacy goals that may be more difficult to achieve under normal circumstances. At the same time, however, the Olympics accentuate nationalist and patriotic sentiment, especially in host-nations. Nationalist conviction must be conceptually differentiated from support for the national government. Indeed, we suggest that one of the tasks of governments of Olympic host cities is to manage strong nationalist emotions in order that they support the public diplomacy efforts associated with the Olympic Games. In this paper, American and Japanese media responses to the

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | politics | diplomacy | cultural identity | broadcasting | propaganda | Beijing 2008 | nationalism | mega-event | event management | media | television | Human Rights | NGO | OPHR | Olympic Torch relay | Sichuan earthquake | protest.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Perceptions of Terrorism Threats at the 2004 Olympic Games: Implications for Sport Events

Description

Keltner, 2001), we investigated effects of anger and fear on risk judgments of 277 attendees at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Attendees who reported being fearful or feeling unsafe at the Games displayed increased risk estimates and associated concerns, whilst respondents expressing defiance and anger produced opposite reactions. Male respondents had less pessimistic risk perceptions than did females, and men were more likely than women to report that the increased security measures detracted from their Olympic Games experience. Nationality had minimal effect on perceptions of risk except in the case of the host country, with Greek respondents reporting fewer concerns for safety but greater awareness of the security measures present at the Games. The discussion focuses on theoretical, methodol

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Terrorism | Risk | Sport Events | threats | security | Munich 1972 | Munich Massacre | black September | extremists | terrorists | terrorist attacks | anti-terror | violence | protest | disruption | safety | event management.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Mapping the Olympic growth machine

Description

Theories of growth machines and urban regimes have informed the study of urban political economy for more than three decades, but these theories remain focused on intra-urban processes. Using a case study of the bidding process and the planning of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, we explore the transnational dimensions of the urban growth machine and explore common aspects between the growth machine and regime theory literature and the literatures on the entrepreneurial city and transnational urban policy transfers. Through its evolving networks with other urban regimes, Vancouver's growth machine provides a ready forum in which local elites can acquire specialized knowledge on new urban entrepreneurial strategies elsewhere. Actors situated in different parts of the local growt

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Vancouver 2010 | bidding process | event management | urbanisation | urban environment | architecture | urban development | politics | planning | regeneration | city marketing.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Olympic Games: Twenty-First Century challenges as a global Media Event

Description

The age of the television introduced us to the media event. Media events are a unique media genre that results when televsion's visual and narrative power taps intopublic facination with a story that transcends daily experence.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | media | media management | legacy | television | culture | mega event | event management | broadcasting | culture | sports broadcasting | advertising | marketing | commercialisation | Olympic movement | doping | bribery |

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

"Amoral universalism": mediating and staging global and local in the 1998 Nagano Olympic Winter Games

Description

This paper is a case study that critically analyzes the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympic Games. The Olympics are a gigantic global event, largely as a result of significant global media attention, particularly through television and corporate sponsors. However, these entities simultaneously need a specific locale in which to operate. Analytically, the paper focuses on interactions between the global media actors and the host city and its people. It argues that the commercialized nature of the Olympic Games controls not only the program, but also numerous aspects of the local host city to maximize benefit for the media. This paper reviews how historically and structurally the media were able to obtain such extensive control. Then, it argues how the media actually control the locale through the in

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | broadcasting | 1998 Winter Games | mega event | event management | politicians | media | media management | legacy | television | culture.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

How we won the Bid

Description

For the British people, Wednesday 6th July, 2005, was a momentous and historic day. That was the day that Britain was awarded the right to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Such an announcement transformed the image of Britain as a nation capable of hosting large scale sporting mega-events.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | discussion starter | discuss | Winning bid | mega event | event management | politicians | media | media management | legacy | volunteers | oxb:060111:010dd | hospitality | leisure | sport | tourism | Team GB | The Olympics Governance Management.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata