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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT) 21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | energy | USA | USA | oil embargo | oil embargo | Gulf War | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | George Bush | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | fossil fuel | fossil fuel | automobiles | automobiles | suburbia | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | oil drilling | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | solar power | OPEC | OPEC | EPA | EPA | Earth Day | Earth Day | environmentalism | environmentalism | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Levittown | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT) EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop

Subjects

sustainable energy | sustainable energy | renewable energy | renewable energy | green energy | green energy | sustainable development | sustainable development | third world | third world | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | solar power | solar power | wind power | wind power | micro-hydro power | micro-hydro power | design | design | co-creation | co-creation | Nicaragua | Nicaragua

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is offered both to undergraduates (6.061) and graduates (6.979), where the graduate version has different problem sets and an additional term project. 6.061 / 6.979 is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Material encountered in the subject includes: Fundamentals of energy-handling electric circuits and electromechanical apparatus. Modeling of magnetic field devices and description of their behavior using appropriate models. Simplification of problems using transformation techniques. Power electric circuits, magnetic circuits, lumped parameter electromechanics, elements of linear and rotating electric machinery. Modeling of synchronous, induction and dc machinery. The course uses examples from current rese This course is offered both to undergraduates (6.061) and graduates (6.979), where the graduate version has different problem sets and an additional term project. 6.061 / 6.979 is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Material encountered in the subject includes: Fundamentals of energy-handling electric circuits and electromechanical apparatus. Modeling of magnetic field devices and description of their behavior using appropriate models. Simplification of problems using transformation techniques. Power electric circuits, magnetic circuits, lumped parameter electromechanics, elements of linear and rotating electric machinery. Modeling of synchronous, induction and dc machinery. The course uses examples from current rese

Subjects

electric power | electric power | electric power system | electric power system | electric circuits | electric circuits | electromechanical apparatus | electromechanical apparatus | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | transformation techniques | transformation techniques | magnetic circuits | magnetic circuits | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics | linear electric machinery | linear electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | synchronous machinery | synchronous machinery | induction machinery | induction machinery | dc machinery. | dc machinery. | mechanical energy conversion | mechanical energy conversion | energy | energy | new applications | new applications | dc machinery | dc machinery

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Examples of new uses for electric power include all manners of electric transportation systems (electric trains that run under catenary, diesel-electric railroad locomotion, 'maglev' medium and high speed tracked vehicles, electric transmission systems for ships, replacement of hydraulics in high performance actuators, aircraft launch and recovery systems, battery powered factory material transport systems, electric and hybrid electric cars and buses, even the 'more electric' airplane). The material in this subject w This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Examples of new uses for electric power include all manners of electric transportation systems (electric trains that run under catenary, diesel-electric railroad locomotion, 'maglev' medium and high speed tracked vehicles, electric transmission systems for ships, replacement of hydraulics in high performance actuators, aircraft launch and recovery systems, battery powered factory material transport systems, electric and hybrid electric cars and buses, even the 'more electric' airplane). The material in this subject w

Subjects

electric power | electric power | electric power system | electric power system | electric circuits | electric circuits | electromechanical apparatus | electromechanical apparatus | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | transformation techniques | transformation techniques | magnetic circuits | magnetic circuits | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics | linear electric machinery | linear electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | rotating electric machinery | synchronous machinery | synchronous machinery | induction machinery | induction machinery | dc machinery. | dc machinery. | mechanical energy conversion | mechanical energy conversion | energy | energy | new applications | new applications

License

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | LWR | LWR | light water reactor | light water reactor | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation radioactivity | radiation radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling Seabrook | cooling Seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium | economics of nuclear power | economics of nuclear power | materials slection | materials slection | IRIS | IRIS | materials selection | materials selection

License

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | Assessment of energy systems | resources | resources | extraction | extraction | conversion | conversion | and end-use | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | 21st century | sustainable manner | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | biomass energy | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | solar energy | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | analysis of energy technology systems | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.812J Managing Nuclear Technology (MIT) 22.812J Managing Nuclear Technology (MIT)

Description

An examination of current economic and policy issues in the electric power industry, focusing on nuclear power and its fuel cycle. Introduces techniques for analyzing private and public policy alternatives, including discounted cash flow methods and other techniques in engineering economics. Application to specific problem areas, including nuclear waste management and weapons proliferation. Other topics include deregulation and restructuring in the electric power industry. An examination of current economic and policy issues in the electric power industry, focusing on nuclear power and its fuel cycle. Introduces techniques for analyzing private and public policy alternatives, including discounted cash flow methods and other techniques in engineering economics. Application to specific problem areas, including nuclear waste management and weapons proliferation. Other topics include deregulation and restructuring in the electric power industry.

Subjects

electric power industry | electric power industry | nuclear power | nuclear power | fuel cycle | fuel cycle | analyzing private and public policy alternatives | analyzing private and public policy alternatives | discounted cash flow methods | discounted cash flow methods | engineering economics | engineering economics | nuclear waste management | nuclear waste management | weapons proliferation | weapons proliferation | deregulation | deregulation | restructuring | restructuring | 22.812 | 22.812 | ESD.163 | ESD.163

License

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT) 5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca "Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | energy | environment | environment | society | society | energy initiative | energy initiative | project-based | project-based | energy management | energy management | project design | project design | renewable energy | renewable energy | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | transportation | transportation | wind power | wind power | wind mill | wind mill | energy recovery | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | infrastructure | climate | climate | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy calculator | energy calculator | solar power | solar power | solarthermal | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | greenhouse gas | emissions | emissions | turbines | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT) 14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives. This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Subjects

government | government | market power | market power | strategy | strategy | economics | economics | game theory | game theory | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | pricing | pricing | spatial model | spatial model | public policy | public policy | competitive markets | competitive markets | firm behavior | firm behavior | industrial organization | industrial organization | imperfectly competitive markets | imperfectly competitive markets | firm acquisition | firm acquisition | government competition policy | government competition policy | market power firms | market power firms | dynamic games | dynamic games

License

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

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6.691 Seminar in Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.691 Seminar in Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course comprises of a seminar on planning and operation of modern electric power systems. Content varies with current interests of instructor and class; emphasis on engineering aspects, but economic issues may be examined too. Core topics include: overview of power system structure and operation; representation of components, including transmission lines, transformers, generating plants, loads; power flow analysis, dynamics and control of multimachine systems, steady-state and transient stability, system protection; economic dispatch; mobile and isolated power systems; computation and simulation. This course comprises of a seminar on planning and operation of modern electric power systems. Content varies with current interests of instructor and class; emphasis on engineering aspects, but economic issues may be examined too. Core topics include: overview of power system structure and operation; representation of components, including transmission lines, transformers, generating plants, loads; power flow analysis, dynamics and control of multimachine systems, steady-state and transient stability, system protection; economic dispatch; mobile and isolated power systems; computation and simulation.

Subjects

Planning and operation of modern electric power systems | Planning and operation of modern electric power systems | engineering aspects | engineering aspects | power system structure and operation | power system structure and operation | representation of components | representation of components | transmission lines | transmission lines | transformers | transformers | generating plants | generating plants | loads | loads | power flow analysis | power flow analysis | dynamics and control of multimachine systems | dynamics and control of multimachine systems | steady-state and transient stability | steady-state and transient stability | system protection | system protection | economic dispatch | economic dispatch | mobil and isolated power systems | mobil and isolated power systems | computation and simulation | computation and simulation

License

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT) EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.025 | 11.472 | 11.472 | development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | China | China | India | India | Rwanda | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Tanzania | Africa | Africa | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | stove | stove | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | World Bank | World Bank | NGO | NGO | United Nations | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4D | ICT4C | ICT4C | microfinance | microfinance | micro-finance | micro-finance | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | wind power | wind power | solar power | solar power | biomass | biomass | biodiesel | biodiesel | biogas | biogas | agriculture | agriculture | farming | farming | food | food | green revolution | green revolution | millenium development goals | millenium development goals

License

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534. The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534.

Subjects

renewable energy | renewable energy | conservation | conservation | alternative power | alternative power | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | efficiency | efficiency | system analysis | system analysis | greenhouse | greenhouse | consumption | consumption | fuel | fuel | resource allocation | resource allocation | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy use | energy use | energy transfer | energy transfer | conversion | conversion | clean technologies | clean technologies | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | electrochemical energy | electrochemical energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | wind power | wind power | fusion energy | fusion energy | fossil energy | fossil energy | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | energy supply | energy supply | energy demand | energy demand | 10.391 | 10.391 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811ESD.166J | 22.811ESD.166J | ESD.166 | ESD.166

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SP.775 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international development.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate

Subjects

sustainable energy | renewable energy | green energy | sustainable development | third world | appropriate technology | solar power | wind power | micro-hydro power | design | co-creation | Nicaragua

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international development.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate

Subjects

sustainable energy | renewable energy | green energy | sustainable development | third world | appropriate technology | solar power | wind power | micro-hydro power | design | co-creation | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | USA | oil embargo | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | nuclear power | wind power | fossil fuel | automobiles | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | global warming | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | OPEC | EPA | Earth Day | environmentalism | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Manhattan Project

License

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SP.721 D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

development project | appropriate technology | sustainable development | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | China | India | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Africa | developing country | international development | third world | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | grain mill | solar energy | stove | energy | charcoal | wheelchair | water | water quality | safe water | water treatment | health | sanitation | World Bank | NGO | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4C | microfinance | micro-finance | AIDS | HIV | wind power | solar power | biomass | biodiesel | biogas | agriculture | farming | food | green revolution | millenium development goals

License

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

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EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT) EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | engineering | engineering | local production | local production | third world | third world | disabled | disabled | disability | disability | assistive technology | assistive technology | human power | human power | Africa | Africa | Tanzania | Tanzania | Zambia | Zambia | Kenya | Kenya | handicap | handicap | handicapped | handicapped | poverty | poverty | rural | rural | discrimination | discrimination | orthopedic | orthopedic | mobility | mobility | tricycle | tricycle | handcycle | handcycle | product design | product design | business plan | business plan | ergonomics | ergonomics | manufacturing | manufacturing | stakeholder | stakeholder | service learning | service learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems (MIT) 22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems (MIT)

Description

In this course, students explore the engineering design of nuclear power plants using the basic principles of reactor physics, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer. Topics include reactor designs, thermal analysis of nuclear fuel, reactor coolant flow and heat transfer, power conversion cycles, nuclear safety, and reactor dynamic behavior. In this course, students explore the engineering design of nuclear power plants using the basic principles of reactor physics, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer. Topics include reactor designs, thermal analysis of nuclear fuel, reactor coolant flow and heat transfer, power conversion cycles, nuclear safety, and reactor dynamic behavior.

Subjects

nuclear power overview | nuclear power overview | accelerators | accelerators | reactor physics review | reactor physics review | thermal parameters | thermal parameters | PWR | PWR | BWR | BWR | reactor design | reactor design | thermal analysis of fuel | thermal analysis of fuel | ideal gas and incompressible fluid models | ideal gas and incompressible fluid models | single phase coolant heat transfer | single phase coolant heat transfer | pure substance model | pure substance model | two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer | two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer | power cycles | power cycles | nuclear safety | nuclear safety

License

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation | radiation | radioactivity | radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling | cooling | seabrook | seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium

License

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22.314J Structural Mechanics in Nuclear Power Technology (MIT) 22.314J Structural Mechanics in Nuclear Power Technology (MIT)

Description

This course deals with structural components in nuclear power plant systems, their functional purposes, operating conditions, and mechanical-structural design requirements. It combines mechanics techniques with models of material behavior to determine adequacy of component design. Considerations include mechanical loading, brittle fracture, in-elastic behavior, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, and seismic effects. This course deals with structural components in nuclear power plant systems, their functional purposes, operating conditions, and mechanical-structural design requirements. It combines mechanics techniques with models of material behavior to determine adequacy of component design. Considerations include mechanical loading, brittle fracture, in-elastic behavior, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, and seismic effects.

Subjects

nuclear power plant systems | nuclear power plant systems | structure | structure | function | function | operating conditions | operating conditions | and mechanical-structural design requirements | and mechanical-structural design requirements | modeling | modeling | component design | component design | mechanical loading | mechanical loading | brittle fracture | brittle fracture | inelastic behavior | inelastic behavior | elevated temperatures | elevated temperatures | neutron irradiation | neutron irradiation | seismic effects | seismic effects

License

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22.012 Seminar: Fusion and Plasma Physics (MIT) 22.012 Seminar: Fusion and Plasma Physics (MIT)

Description

This course uses lectures and discussion to introduce the range of topics relevant to plasma physics and fusion engineering. An introductory discussion of the economic and ecological motivation for the development of fusion power is also presented. Contemporary magnetic confinement schemes, theoretical questions, and engineering considerations are presented by expert guest lecturers. Students enrolled in the course also tour the Plasma Science and Fusion Center experimental facilities. This course uses lectures and discussion to introduce the range of topics relevant to plasma physics and fusion engineering. An introductory discussion of the economic and ecological motivation for the development of fusion power is also presented. Contemporary magnetic confinement schemes, theoretical questions, and engineering considerations are presented by expert guest lecturers. Students enrolled in the course also tour the Plasma Science and Fusion Center experimental facilities.

Subjects

plasma physics | plasma physics | fusion engineering | fusion engineering | fusion power | fusion power | contemporary magnetic confinement schemes | contemporary magnetic confinement schemes | Plasma Science and Fusion Center | Plasma Science and Fusion Center | ITER | ITER

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.20 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Subjects

government | market power | strategy | economics | game theory | monopoly | oligopoly | pricing | spatial model | public policy | competitive markets | firm behavior | industrial organization | imperfectly competitive markets | firm acquisition | government competition policy | market power firms | dynamic games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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