Searching for redevelopment : 10 results found | RSS Feed for this search

11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT) 11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT)

Description

There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites. There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites.

Subjects

brownfields | brownfields | environmental policy | environmental policy | environmental practice | environmental practice | planning | planning | urban redevelopment | urban redevelopment | market forces | market forces | law and liability | law and liability | environmental justice | environmental justice | under-served communities | under-served communities | environmental technology | environmental technology | risk assessment | risk assessment | economics | economics | risk management | risk management | community development corporations | community development corporations | politics | politics | Lynn | MA | Lynn | MA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

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Olympic Games: catalyst of urban change

Description

The Olympic Games have emerged as a significant catalyst of urban change and can act as a key instrument of urban policy for their host cities. This paper reviews the effect of the Games on the built environment of the various cities which have acted as hosts in the modern Olympic period (1896-1996) and assesses the preparations now being made for the Games in Sydney in the year 2000. The review indicates that the Games have been increasingly used as a trigger for a wide range of urban improvements, although there have been considerable variations in the scale of infrastructural investment and in the public-private sector mix.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | post-Fordism | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | modern olympics | Pierre de Coubertin | sustainability | Munich 1972 | Montreal 1976 | Moscow 1980 | Los Angeles 1984 | Seoul 1988 | Barcelona 1992 | Atlanta 1996 | Sydney 2000 | globalisation.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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A brief historical review of Olympic urbanization

Description

Recent decades have seen an increased interest from the world's major cities to bid for international sporting events and to use them as agents for urban transformation. In this paper the particular focus is that of urban development driven by the preparation for the Olympic Summer Games. Starting with Coubertin's utopian concept for the creation of a 'modern Olympia', Olympic urbanization has been developing for over a century. The result is that in various cities with often diverse urban patterns and cultures, the Games have left very different impacts on the local environment. This paper outlines the history and changes in urbanization within those cities that have acted as hosts during the modern Olympic period (1896-2012). It also discusses key factors in connection with the creat

Subjects

urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | legacy | Olympic history | investment | funding | public expenditure | finance | HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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Post-event Outcomes and the Post-modern Turn: The Olympics and Urban Transformations

Description

The Olympics are analysed from an urban perspective as an event that has an impact on cities beyond sport. The focus of the paper is on post-event outcomes and particularly on Olympic-related facilities and how they are used once the Olympics are over. The 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics serves as the primary illustration of the processes described. The transformation of the urban order is discussed in terms of the post-modern turn and it is shown how the Olympics are affected by and contributes to the support of the shift toward leisure consumption as a dominant theme in the new urban symbolic economy. Issues such as place marketing, urban restructuring, urban regionalization, surveillance, and social exclusion are also related to post-Olympic outcomes.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | globalisation | cities | legacy | sustainability | impact | host city | leisure consumer | social exclusion.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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Post-event Outcomes and the Post-modern Turn: The Olympics and Urban Transformations

Description

The Olympics are analysed from an urban perspective as an event that has an impact on cities beyond sport. The focus of the paper is on post-event outcomes and particularly on Olympic-related facilities and how they are used once the Olympics are over. The 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics serves as the primary illustration of the processes described. The transformation of the urban order is discussed in terms of the post-modern turn and it is shown how the Olympics are affected by and contributes to the support of the shift toward leisure consumption as a dominant theme in the new urban symbolic economy. Issues such as place marketing, urban restructuring, urban regionalization, surveillance, and social exclusion are also related to post-Olympic outcomes.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | globalisation | cities | legacy | sustainability | impact | host city | leisure consumer | social exclusion.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Olympic Games: catalyst of urban change

Description

The Olympic Games have emerged as a significant catalyst of urban change and can act as a key instrument of urban policy for their host cities. This paper reviews the effect of the Games on the built environment of the various cities which have acted as hosts in the modern Olympic period (1896-1996) and assesses the preparations now being made for the Games in Sydney in the year 2000. The review indicates that the Games have been increasingly used as a trigger for a wide range of urban improvements, although there have been considerable variations in the scale of infrastructural investment and in the public-private sector mix.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | post-Fordism | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | modern olympics | Pierre de Coubertin | sustainability | Munich 1972 | Montreal 1976 | Moscow 1980 | Los Angeles 1984 | Seoul 1988 | Barcelona 1992 | Atlanta 1996 | Sydney 2000 | globalisation.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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A brief historical review of Olympic urbanization

Description

Recent decades have seen an increased interest from the world's major cities to bid for international sporting events and to use them as agents for urban transformation. In this paper the particular focus is that of urban development driven by the preparation for the Olympic Summer Games. Starting with Coubertin's utopian concept for the creation of a 'modern Olympia', Olympic urbanization has been developing for over a century. The result is that in various cities with often diverse urban patterns and cultures, the Games have left very different impacts on the local environment. This paper outlines the history and changes in urbanization within those cities that have acted as hosts during the modern Olympic period (1896-2012). It also discusses key factors in connection with the creat

Subjects

urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | legacy | Olympic history | investment | funding | public expenditure | finance | HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | China | urban design | development | shougang | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | heritage site | environment | urban development | energy | site understanding | land use | design concept | bioremediation | transit | subway | light rail | urban planning | architecture | brownfield

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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11.370 Brownfields Policy and Practice (MIT)

Description

There are several hundred thousand Brownfield sites across the country. The large number of sites, combined with how a majority of these properties are located in urban and historically underserved communities, dictate that redevelopment of these sites stands to be a common theme in urban planning for the foreseeable future. Students form a grounded understanding of the Brownfield lifecycle: how and why they were created, their potential role in community revitalization, and the general processes governing their redevelopment. Using case studies and guest speakers from the public, private and non-profit sectors, students develop and hone skills to effectively address the problems posed by these inactive sites.

Subjects

brownfields | environmental policy | environmental practice | planning | urban redevelopment | market forces | law and liability | environmental justice | under-served communities | environmental technology | risk assessment | economics | risk management | community development corporations | politics | Lynn | MA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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