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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed. This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed.

Subjects

Meaning and reference | Meaning and reference | empiricist theories | empiricist theories | psychological theories | psychological theories | truth-conditional theories | truth-conditional theories | pretense and attitude ascriptions | pretense and attitude ascriptions | hidden indexical theory | hidden indexical theory | implicature theory | implicature theory | pragmatic theory | pragmatic theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.996A Simplicity Theory (MIT) 18.996A Simplicity Theory (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced topics course in model theory whose main theme is simple theories. We treat simple theories in the framework of compact abstract theories, which is more general than that of first order theories. We cover the basic properties of independence (i.e., non-dividing) in simple theories, the characterization of simple theories by the existence of a notion of independence, and hyperimaginary canonical bases. This is an advanced topics course in model theory whose main theme is simple theories. We treat simple theories in the framework of compact abstract theories, which is more general than that of first order theories. We cover the basic properties of independence (i.e., non-dividing) in simple theories, the characterization of simple theories by the existence of a notion of independence, and hyperimaginary canonical bases.

Subjects

universal domains | universal domains | compact abstract theories | compact abstract theories | indiscernibility | indiscernibility | indiscernible sequences | indiscernible sequences | dividing | dividing | simplicity | simplicity | independence | independence | Lascar strong types | Lascar strong types | independence theorem | independence theorem | hyperimaginaries | hyperimaginaries | canonical bases | canonical bases | supersimplicity | supersimplicity | Lascar inequalities | Lascar inequalities | stability | stability | stable theories | stable theories | generic automorphism | generic automorphism | type-definable groups | type-definable groups | lovely pairs | lovely pairs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT) 18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory. Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | Renormalization group equation | classical | classical | field | field | theory | theory | Feynman | Feynman | diagrams | diagrams | free | free | quantum | quantum | theories | theories | local | local | operators | operators | product | product | expansion | expansion | perturbative | perturbative | renormalization | renormalization | group | group | equations | equations | functional | functional | function | function | intergrals | intergrals | operator | operator | QFT | QFT | string | string | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | geometric | geometric | algebraic | algebraic | topology | topology | number | number | 0-dimensional | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supergeometry | supersymmetry | supersymmetry | conformal | conformal | stationary | stationary | phase | phase | formula | formula | calculus | calculus | combinatorics | combinatorics | matrix | matrix | mechanics | mechanics | lagrangians | lagrangians | hamiltons | hamiltons | least | least | action | action | principle | principle | limits | limits | formalism | formalism | Feynman-Kac | Feynman-Kac | current | current | charges | charges | Noether?s | Noether?s | theorem | theorem | path | path | integral | integral | approach | approach | divergences | divergences | functional integrals | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | renormalization theory | local operators | local operators | operator product expansion | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | mathematical language | string theory | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | number theory | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT) 21M.603 Principles of Design (MIT)

Description

This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance. This course deals with advanced design theories and textual analysis. Emphasis is placed on script analysis in general, as well as the investigation of design principles from a designer's perspective. Students also refine technical skills in rendering and presentation, historical research, and analysis. Class sessions include interaction with student/faculty directors and other staff designers. The goal of this course is for students to approach text with a fresh vision and translate that vision into design for performance.

Subjects

Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories; textual analysis; script analysis; technical skills; rendering; presentation; historical research; performance; Lysistrata; Aristophanes. | Design theories | Design theories | textual analysis | textual analysis | script analysis | script analysis | technical skills | technical skills | rendering | rendering | presentation | presentation | historical research | historical research | performance | performance | Lysistrata | Lysistrata | Aristophanes | Aristophanes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed.

Subjects

Meaning and reference | empiricist theories | psychological theories | truth-conditional theories | pretense and attitude ascriptions | hidden indexical theory | implicature theory | pragmatic theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP4A35 Philosophy D: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Description

This unit aims to develop knowledge and understanding of classical and contemporary theories of morality. It introduces you to the philosophical study of ethics and metaethics and develops your skills in applying these concepts to a contemporary ethical issue.

Subjects

DP4A 35 | nominative theories of morality | meta-ethical theories of morality | contemporary ethical theories | Plato | Aristotle | Immanuel Kant | utilitarians | applied ethics | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | D: Humanities (History/Archaeology/Religious Studies/Philosophy) | SCQF Level 8

License

Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT) 8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics include functional path integrals, renormalization and renormalization groups, quantization of nonabelian gauge theories, BRST symmetry, renormalization and symmetry breaking, critical exponents and scalar field theory, and perturbation theory anomalies. This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics include functional path integrals, renormalization and renormalization groups, quantization of nonabelian gauge theories, BRST symmetry, renormalization and symmetry breaking, critical exponents and scalar field theory, and perturbation theory anomalies.

Subjects

Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nonabelian gauge theories | nonabelian gauge theories | BRST symmetry | BRST symmetry | Perturbation theory anomalies | Perturbation theory anomalies | Renormalization | Renormalization | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | Critical exponents | Critical exponents | scalar field theory | scalar field theory | Conformal field theory | Conformal field theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 2401: Fatigue Behaviour and Analysis

Description

This lecture explains why, when and where fatigue problems may arise and the special significance to aluminium as structural material; it helps to understand the effects of material and loading parameters on fatigue; to appreciate the statistical nature of fatigue and its importance in data analysis, evaluation and use; it shows how to estimate fatigue life under service conditions of time-dependent, variable amplitude loading; how to estimate stresses acting in notches and welds with conceptual approaches other than nominal stress; it provides qualitative and quantitative information on the classification of welded details and allow for more sophisticated design procedures. Background in materials engineering, design and fatigue is required.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | design | fatigue | fatigue cracks | susceptibility | cyclic loading | crack growth | crack propagation rate | endurance limit | predictive theories | damage accumulation theories | manson-coffin law | crack growth laws | ideal cumulative damage theory | fatigue data analysis | middle-cycle fatigue range | high-cycle fatigue range | fatigue diagrams | linear p-s-n curves | non-linear p-s-n curves | service behaviour | time dependent loads | load spectrum | cycle counting | rain-flow cycle counting method | service behaviour fatigue test | analytical life estimation | damage accumulation | palmgren-miner linear damage accumulation hypothesis | strain | fatigue life | notch theory | strain-life diagram | weld imperfections | static strength | fatigue strength | cracks | porosity | inclusions | oxides | lack of penetration | weld shape | lack of fusion | geometric misalignment | arc strike | spatter | post-weld mechanical imperfections | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT) 14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT)

Description

This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics. This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics.

Subjects

organizational economics | organizational economics | classic evidence | classic evidence | formal theories | formal theories | contracting between firms | contracting between firms | evidence on contracts | evidence on contracts | business cases | business cases | performance pay | performance pay | incentives | incentives | job assignment | job assignment | skill development | skill development | networks | networks | employment systems | employment systems | decision processes | decision processes | authority | authority | power | power | leadership | leadership | politics | politics | influence | influence | language | language | hierarchical models | hierarchical models | organizational structure | organizational structure | conglomerates | conglomerates | corporate strategy | corporate strategy | corporate governance | corporate governance | corporate capital | corporate capital | firm | firm | relational contracts | relational contracts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT) 8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material.

Subjects

Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nonabelian gauge theories | nonabelian gauge theories | BRST symmetry | BRST symmetry | Perturbation theory anomalies | Perturbation theory anomalies | Renormalization | Renormalization | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | Critical exponents | Critical exponents | scalar field theory | scalar field theory | Conformal field theory | Conformal field theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.821 String Theory (MIT) 8.821 String Theory (MIT)

Description

This is a one-semester class about gauge/gravity duality (often called AdS/CFT) and its applications. This is a one-semester class about gauge/gravity duality (often called AdS/CFT) and its applications.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | conformal field theory | conformal field theory | light-cone and covariant quantization of the relativistic bosonic string | light-cone and covariant quantization of the relativistic bosonic string | quantization and spectrum of supersymmetric 10-dimensional string theories | quantization and spectrum of supersymmetric 10-dimensional string theories | T-duality and D-branes | T-duality and D-branes | toroidal compactification and orbifolds | toroidal compactification and orbifolds | 11-dimensional supergravity and M-theory. | 11-dimensional supergravity and M-theory.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site. This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.Technical RequirementsSoftware to view the .tex files on this course site can be accessed via the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network (CTAN) and the TeX Users Group Web site. Postscript viewer software, such as Ghostscript/Ghostview, can be used to view the .ps files found on this course site.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT) 11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | diagrams | reflective practice | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Donald Schon | practice | practice | learning | learning | conceptual innovation | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | cognitive resources | socialization | socialization | externalization | externalization | combination | combination | internalization | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

License

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics. This course introduces string theory to undergraduate and is based upon Prof. Zwiebach's textbook entitled A First Course in String Theory. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity and basic quantum mechanics. This course develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism and statistical mechanics.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics. Light-cone | string thermodynamics. Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT) 8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation. This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation.

Subjects

general relativity | general relativity | big bang | big bang | cosmology | cosmology | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | early universe | early universe | cosmic background radiation | cosmic background radiation | primordial nucleosynthesis | primordial nucleosynthesis | standard model | standard model | electroweak and QCD phase transition | electroweak and QCD phase transition | group theory | group theory | grand unified theories | grand unified theories | baryon asymmetry | baryon asymmetry | monopoles | monopoles | cosmic strings | cosmic strings | domain walls | domain walls | axions | axions | inflationary universe | inflationary universe | structure formation | structure formation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

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8.513 Many-Body Theory for Condensed Matter Systems (MIT) 8.513 Many-Body Theory for Condensed Matter Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the concepts and physical pictures behind various phenomena that appear in interacting many-body systems. Visualization occurs through concentration on path integral, mean-field theories and semi-classical picture of fluctuations around mean-field state. This course covers the concepts and physical pictures behind various phenomena that appear in interacting many-body systems. Visualization occurs through concentration on path integral, mean-field theories and semi-classical picture of fluctuations around mean-field state.

Subjects

second quantization | second quantization | path-integrals | path-integrals | condensed matter | condensed matter | Goldstone modes | Goldstone modes | rigidity | rigidity | topological defects | topological defects | Mean field theory | Mean field theory | Landau Fermi Liquid Theory | Landau Fermi Liquid Theory | BCS superconductivity | BCS superconductivity | Quantum Phase Transitions | Quantum Phase Transitions | Renormalization group | Renormalization group | Duality transformations | Duality transformations | Luttinger Liquid Theory | Luttinger Liquid Theory | bosonization | bosonization | broken symmetry | broken symmetry | fractionalization | fractionalization | Fractional quantum Hall effect | Fractional quantum Hall effect | spin liquids | spin liquids | gauge theories in condensed matter | gauge theories in condensed matter

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8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT) 8.251 String Theory for Undergraduates (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics. Introduction to the main concepts of string theory to undergraduates. Since string theory is quantum mechanics of a relativistic string, the foundations of the subject can be explained to students exposed to both special relativity (8.033) and basic quantum mechanics (8.05). Subject develops the aspects of string theory and makes it accessible to students familiar with basic electromagnetism (8.02) and statistical mechanics (8.044). This includes the study of D-branes and string thermodynamics.

Subjects

string theory | string theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | relativistic string | relativistic string | special relativity | special relativity | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | D-branes | D-branes | string thermodynamics | string thermodynamics | Light-cone | Light-cone | Tachyons | Tachyons | Kalb-Ramond fields | Kalb-Ramond fields | Lorentz invariance | Lorentz invariance | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Born-Infeld electrodynamics | Hagedorn temperature | Hagedorn temperature | Riemann surfaces | Riemann surfaces | fermionic string theories | fermionic string theories | nuclear reactions | nuclear reactions

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8.08 Statistical Physics II (MIT) 8.08 Statistical Physics II (MIT)

Description

This course covers probability distributions for classical and quantum systems. Topics include: Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical partition-functions and associated thermodynamic potentials. Also discussed are conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems. The course follows 8.044, Statistical Physics I, and is second in this series of undergraduate Statistical Physics courses. This course covers probability distributions for classical and quantum systems. Topics include: Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical partition-functions and associated thermodynamic potentials. Also discussed are conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems. The course follows 8.044, Statistical Physics I, and is second in this series of undergraduate Statistical Physics courses.

Subjects

Probability distributions | Probability distributions | quantum systems | quantum systems | Microcanonical | canonical | and grand canonical partition-functions | Microcanonical | canonical | and grand canonical partition-functions | thermodynamic potentials | thermodynamic potentials | Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems | Conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium for homogenous and heterogenous systems | non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases | non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases | mean field theories for real gases | mean field theories for real gases | binary mixtures | binary mixtures | magnetic systems | magnetic systems | polymer solutions | polymer solutions | phase and reaction equilibria | phase and reaction equilibria | critical phenomena | critical phenomena | Fluctuations | Fluctuations | correlation functions and susceptibilities | and Kubo formulae | correlation functions and susceptibilities | and Kubo formulae | Evolution of distribution functions: Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations | Evolution of distribution functions: Boltzmann and Smoluchowski equations

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

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5.68J Kinetics of Chemical Reactions (MIT) 5.68J Kinetics of Chemical Reactions (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the experimental and theoretical aspects of chemical reaction kinetics, including transition-state theories, molecular beam scattering, classical techniques, quantum and statistical mechanical estimation of rate constants, pressure-dependence and chemical activation, modeling complex reacting mixtures, and uncertainty/sensitivity analyses. Reactions in the gas phase, liquid phase, and on surfaces are discussed with examples drawn from atmospheric, combustion, industrial, catalytic, and biological chemistry. This course deals with the experimental and theoretical aspects of chemical reaction kinetics, including transition-state theories, molecular beam scattering, classical techniques, quantum and statistical mechanical estimation of rate constants, pressure-dependence and chemical activation, modeling complex reacting mixtures, and uncertainty/sensitivity analyses. Reactions in the gas phase, liquid phase, and on surfaces are discussed with examples drawn from atmospheric, combustion, industrial, catalytic, and biological chemistry.

Subjects

quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | chemical reaction kinetics | chemical reaction kinetics | transition-state theories | transition-state theories | molecular beam scattering | molecular beam scattering | classical techniques | classical techniques | rate constants | rate constants | pressure-dependence | pressure-dependence | chemical activation | chemical activation | atmosphere | atmosphere | combustion | combustion | catalytic | catalytic | biological chemistry | biological chemistry | elementary kinetics | elementary kinetics | experimental kinetics | experimental kinetics | reaction rate theory | reaction rate theory | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | practical prediction methods | practical prediction methods | handling large kinetic models | handling large kinetic models | reactions in solution | reactions in solution | catalysis | catalysis | 5.68 | 5.68 | 10.652 | 10.652

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures. This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures.

Subjects

11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.192 | ESD.192 | regional growth | regional growth | political economy | political economy | spatial economic analysis | spatial economic analysis | regional economic growth | regional economic growth | economics | economics | regional theories | regional theories | regional planning | regional planning | regional and urban economics | regional and urban economics | neoclassical | neoclassical | dispersal economies | dispersal economies | regional accounting | regional accounting | social accounting matrices | social accounting matrices | underground economy | underground economy | price indices | price indices | shift share analyses | shift share analyses | energy | energy | determinants of growth | determinants of growth

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

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