Searching for 2011-06-23 : 11 results found | RSS Feed for this search

Embodiment: Taking Sociality Seriously

Description

A very wise person of our acquaintance once said, 'Read old books to get new ideas'. Here, we pursue the ideas presented in old books by Lev Vygotsky and George Herbert Mead as a means to account for the differences in social life between human and non-human primates and, by extension, their cognition. We consider the contrasting perspectives of Vygotsky and Mead on the links between thought and language, and relate these to subsequent developments in the study of animal cognition, and the emergence of the fields of embodied and distributed cognition. We then use this synthesis to argue that, as Wundt originally suggested, the study of social life must be fundamentally social and situated, and cannot be a laboratory endeavour focused solely on processes within individuals. We use develo Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/audio.xml

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Cortico-cerebellar Evolution and the Distributed Neural Basis of Cognition

Description

Biologists interested in cognitive evolution have focussed on the dramatic expansion of the forebrain, particularly the neocortex, in lineages such as primates. Another structure, however - the cerebellum - contains four to five times more neurons than the neocortex, is massively and reciprocally inter-connected with it via intermediate nuclei, has complex cognitive and learning functions, and yet has been largely ignored in accounts of cognitive evolution. This talk explores the correlated evolution and ontogeny of neocortex, cerebellum and associated structures and the implications of such patterns for understanding the neural basis of cognition. Consistent with the idea of embodied cognition, brain size is associated with specific sensory-motor specializations. The results emphasize the Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/audio.xml

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The Mystery of Cumulative Culture

Description

Human demographic and ecological success is frequently attributed to our capacity for cumulative culture, which allows human knowledge and technology to build up and improve over time. Yet it remains a mystery why other animals might possess socially learned traditions but lack this capacity for cumulative cultural knowledge gain. Nor is it immediately apparent what cognitive, social or demographic factors are necessary for accumulation to occur. Here I explore the factors that led to the evolution of the human cultural capability, drawing on a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. I will present insights from the social learning strategies tournament, and comparative statistical analyses of primate social learning, which together imply that there may have been selection Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/audio.xml

Attribution

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Cultural Inheritance of Cultural Learning

Description

It is widely acknowledged that the cumulative cultural inheritance of technological skills and social practices has played a major role in shaping the ways of life of modern humans. The term 'cultural learning' refers to the psychological processes that make cultural inheritance possible. Curiously, even those researchers who have been most influential in demonstrating the importance of cultural inheritance emphasise that cultural learning depends on gene-based psychological adaptations. Like Evolutionary Psychologists, they assume that cultural learning is made possible by genetically-evolved, human-specific and domain-specific cognitive processes. I will suggest that these assumptions are not supported by recent research on social learning and imitation, social decision-making, and soc Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/audio.xml

Attribution

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Welcome and Introduction

Description

Introduction to the "New Thinking: Advances in the Study of Human Cognitive Evolution" conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Embodiment: Taking Sociality Seriously

Description

A very wise person of our acquaintance once said, 'Read old books to get new ideas'. Here, we pursue the ideas presented in old books by Lev Vygotsky and George Herbert Mead as a means to account for the differences in social life between human and non-human primates and, by extension, their cognition. We consider the contrasting perspectives of Vygotsky and Mead on the links between thought and language, and relate these to subsequent developments in the study of animal cognition, and the emergence of the fields of embodied and distributed cognition. We then use this synthesis to argue that, as Wundt originally suggested, the study of social life must be fundamentally social and situated, and cannot be a laboratory endeavour focused solely on processes within individuals. We use develo Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Cortico-cerebellar Evolution and the Distributed Neural Basis of Cognition

Description

Biologists interested in cognitive evolution have focussed on the dramatic expansion of the forebrain, particularly the neocortex, in lineages such as primates. Another structure, however - the cerebellum - contains four to five times more neurons than the neocortex, is massively and reciprocally inter-connected with it via intermediate nuclei, has complex cognitive and learning functions, and yet has been largely ignored in accounts of cognitive evolution. This talk explores the correlated evolution and ontogeny of neocortex, cerebellum and associated structures and the implications of such patterns for understanding the neural basis of cognition. Consistent with the idea of embodied cognition, brain size is associated with specific sensory-motor specializations. The results emphasize the Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Mystery of Cumulative Culture

Description

Human demographic and ecological success is frequently attributed to our capacity for cumulative culture, which allows human knowledge and technology to build up and improve over time. Yet it remains a mystery why other animals might possess socially learned traditions but lack this capacity for cumulative cultural knowledge gain. Nor is it immediately apparent what cognitive, social or demographic factors are necessary for accumulation to occur. Here I explore the factors that led to the evolution of the human cultural capability, drawing on a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. I will present insights from the social learning strategies tournament, and comparative statistical analyses of primate social learning, which together imply that there may have been selection Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cultural Inheritance of Cultural Learning

Description

It is widely acknowledged that the cumulative cultural inheritance of technological skills and social practices has played a major role in shaping the ways of life of modern humans. The term 'cultural learning' refers to the psychological processes that make cultural inheritance possible. Curiously, even those researchers who have been most influential in demonstrating the importance of cultural inheritance emphasise that cultural learning depends on gene-based psychological adaptations. Like Evolutionary Psychologists, they assume that cultural learning is made possible by genetically-evolved, human-specific and domain-specific cognitive processes. I will suggest that these assumptions are not supported by recent research on social learning and imitation, social decision-making, and soc Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/video.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Welcome and Introduction

Description

Introduction to the "New Thinking: Advances in the Study of Human Cognitive Evolution" conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | anthropology | evolution | cognitve | human | Social Sciences | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129225/video.xml

Attribution

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2nd St Cross Special Ethics Seminar TT11: Museum Ethics

Description

Museum Ethics. The Museum world, like most professions, encounters various ethical problems. This short talk will consider the ethics of conservation and reconstruction, and of human remains, but will mostly discuss ethical problems associated with the acquisition of cultural property from other countries. Archaeologists are particularly concerned that the trade in antiquities leads to the looting of sites, and illegal export of valuable items. How far can British and American museums continue to maintain collections from the great ancient civilisations when they are unable to acquire important recent finds from other countries? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

museums | st cross | ethics | uehiro | morality | museums | st cross | ethics | uehiro | morality | 2011-06-23

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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