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4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT) 4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT)

Description

This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product. This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | community | community | stakeholders | stakeholders | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | Providence | Providence | Rhode Island | Rhode Island | institutional mechanisms | institutional mechanisms | housing | housing | waterfront | waterfront | port | port | built form | built form | public space | public space | landscape | landscape | path and access systems | path and access systems | parking | parking | density | density | activity location and intensity | activity location and intensity | planning | planning | finance | finance | public/private partnerships | public/private partnerships | parcelization | parcelization | phasing | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | multi-disciplinary teams | 4.163 | 4.163 | 11.332 | 11.332

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.332J Urban Design (MIT) 11.332J Urban Design (MIT)

Description

For many years, Cambridge, MA, as host to two major research universities, has been the scene of debates as to how best to meet the competing expectations of different stakeholders. Where there has been success, it has frequently been the result, at least in part, of inventive urban design proposals and the design and implementation of new institutional arrangements to accomplish those proposals. Where there has been failure it has often been explained by the inability - or unwillingness - of one stakeholder to accept and accommodate the expectations of another. The two most recent fall Urban Design Studios have examined these issues at a larger scale. In 2001 we looked at the possible patterns for growth and change in Cambridge, UK, as triggered by the plans of Cambridge University. And i For many years, Cambridge, MA, as host to two major research universities, has been the scene of debates as to how best to meet the competing expectations of different stakeholders. Where there has been success, it has frequently been the result, at least in part, of inventive urban design proposals and the design and implementation of new institutional arrangements to accomplish those proposals. Where there has been failure it has often been explained by the inability - or unwillingness - of one stakeholder to accept and accommodate the expectations of another. The two most recent fall Urban Design Studios have examined these issues at a larger scale. In 2001 we looked at the possible patterns for growth and change in Cambridge, UK, as triggered by the plans of Cambridge University. And i

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | community | community | stakeholders | stakeholders | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | MIT | MIT | Cambridge | Cambridge | Cambridgeport | Cambridgeport | institutional mechanisms | institutional mechanisms | housing | housing | universities | universities | built form | built form | public space | public space | landscape | landscape | path and access systems | path and access systems | parking | parking | density | density | activity location and intensity | activity location and intensity | planning | planning | finance | finance | public/private partnerships | public/private partnerships | parcelization | parcelization | phasing | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | multi-disciplinary teams | town and gown | town and gown | Massachusetts | Massachusetts | research universities | research universities | urban design | urban design | Fort Washington | Fort Washington | urban form | urban form | biotech research industry | biotech research industry | activity location | activity location | activity intensity | activity intensity | access systems | access systems | paths | paths | 11.332 | 11.332 | 4.163 | 4.163

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT)

Description

This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product.

Subjects

urban planning | community | stakeholders | development | urban growth | Providence | Rhode Island | institutional mechanisms | housing | waterfront | port | built form | public space | landscape | path and access systems | parking | density | activity location and intensity | planning | finance | public/private partnerships | parcelization | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | 4.163 | 11.332

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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11.332J Urban Design (MIT)

Description

For many years, Cambridge, MA, as host to two major research universities, has been the scene of debates as to how best to meet the competing expectations of different stakeholders. Where there has been success, it has frequently been the result, at least in part, of inventive urban design proposals and the design and implementation of new institutional arrangements to accomplish those proposals. Where there has been failure it has often been explained by the inability - or unwillingness - of one stakeholder to accept and accommodate the expectations of another. The two most recent fall Urban Design Studios have examined these issues at a larger scale. In 2001 we looked at the possible patterns for growth and change in Cambridge, UK, as triggered by the plans of Cambridge University. And i

Subjects

urban planning | community | stakeholders | development | urban growth | MIT | Cambridge | Cambridgeport | institutional mechanisms | housing | universities | built form | public space | landscape | path and access systems | parking | density | activity location and intensity | planning | finance | public/private partnerships | parcelization | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | town and gown | Massachusetts | research universities | urban design | Fort Washington | urban form | biotech research industry | activity location | activity intensity | access systems | paths | 11.332 | 4.163

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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