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SP.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT) SP.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other. This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subjects

Africa | Africa | HIV | HIV | AIDS | AIDS | Poverty | Poverty | Zimbabwe | Zimbabwe | Botswana | Botswana | Namibia | Namibia | Angola | Angola | Zaire | Zaire | South Africa | South Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | ESG.SP253 | ESG.SP253

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT) ES.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other. This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subjects

Africa | Africa | HIV | HIV | AIDS | AIDS | Poverty | Poverty | Zimbabwe | Zimbabwe | Botswana | Botswana | Namibia | Namibia | Angola | Angola | Zaire | Zaire | South Africa | South Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | ESG.SP253 | ESG.SP253

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.S01 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT) EC.S01 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is based on the work of the MIT-African Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI). MIT-AITI is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of information technology in today's world.MIT-AITI achieves this goal by sending MIT students to three African nations in order to teach both students and teachers through intensive classroom and lab sessions for six weeks. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-orie Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is based on the work of the MIT-African Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI). MIT-AITI is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of information technology in today's world.MIT-AITI achieves this goal by sending MIT students to three African nations in order to teach both students and teachers through intensive classroom and lab sessions for six weeks. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-orie

Subjects

information technology | information technology | IT | IT | global communities | global communities | digital divide | digital divide | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-AITI | MIT-AITI | African countries | African countries | Ethiopia | Ethiopia | Ghana | Ghana | Kenya | Kenya | IT-related issues | IT-related issues | java | java | java server pages | java server pages | JSP | JSP | programming principles | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | cutting-edge internet technology | free open-source systems | free open-source systems | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Government and press relations in South Africa Government and press relations in South Africa

Description

Seminar delivered by Professor Anton Harber, Caxton Professor of Journalism and Media Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and visiting fellow, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford. Sunday Dare writes: According to a keen observer of the modus operandi of the ANC-led government in South Africa, the "African National Congress (ANC) talks left and walks right". Perhaps no statement better captures the way the government continues to behave when it comes to its relationship with the media. Since the end of apartheid the media have often come under government scrutiny and have had to face up to government criticism that it is hostile and overly critical and insufficiently transformed from the way it was under apartheid. Under the current poli Seminar delivered by Professor Anton Harber, Caxton Professor of Journalism and Media Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and visiting fellow, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford. Sunday Dare writes: According to a keen observer of the modus operandi of the ANC-led government in South Africa, the "African National Congress (ANC) talks left and walks right". Perhaps no statement better captures the way the government continues to behave when it comes to its relationship with the media. Since the end of apartheid the media have often come under government scrutiny and have had to face up to government criticism that it is hostile and overly critical and insufficiently transformed from the way it was under apartheid. Under the current poli

Subjects

journalism | journalism | emerging | emerging | estate | estate | relationship | relationship | government | government | civil | civil | media | media | professor | professor | freedom | freedom | Africa | Africa | harber | harber | apartheid | apartheid | issues | issues | african | african | press | press | south | south | journalism | emerging | estate | relationship | government | civil | media | professor | freedom | Africa | harber | apartheid | issues | african | press | south | 2010-10-27 | journalism | emerging | estate | relationship | government | civil | media | professor | freedom | Africa | harber | apartheid | issues | african | press | south | 2010-10-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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SP.772 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT) SP.772 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT)

Description

The MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI) is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of technology and to equip them with skills that will allow them to be creative, resourceful, and prosperous. The mission statement of the AITI program is based on the idea that information technology carries the potential to empower people around the globe with knowledge. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-oriented projects, and independent learning.MIT-AITI achiev The MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI) is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of technology and to equip them with skills that will allow them to be creative, resourceful, and prosperous. The mission statement of the AITI program is based on the idea that information technology carries the potential to empower people around the globe with knowledge. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-oriented projects, and independent learning.MIT-AITI achiev

Subjects

information technology | information technology | IT | IT | global communities | global communities | digital divide | digital divide | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-AITI | MIT-AITI | African countries | African countries | Ethiopia | Ethiopia | Ghana | Ghana | Kenya | Kenya | IT-related issues | IT-related issues | java | java | java server pages | java server pages | JSP | JSP | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | free open-source systems | free open-source systems | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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What are friends for? Friendship and Public life in the post colony: African Studies Centre Annual Lecture 2013

Description

Wale Adebanwi, Associate Professor, African American and African Studies, University of California-Davies, gives the 2013 African Studies Annual Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Colonialism | African Studies | Africa | society | politics | Nigeria | Colonialism | African Studies | Africa | society | politics | Nigeria

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT) 12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT)

Description

This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since. This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since.

Subjects

African continent | African continent | Panafrican continental collisions | Panafrican continental collisions | Afro-Arabian plate | Afro-Arabian plate | African plate | African plate | Cambro-Ordovician times | Cambro-Ordovician times | geodynamic evolution | geodynamic evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subjects

Africa | HIV | AIDS | Poverty | Zimbabwe | Botswana | Namibia | Angola | Zaire | South Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | ESG.SP253

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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…: Rwandan refugees and the latest bilateral politicking in the Great Lakes

Description

The year 2002 marked the initiation of discussions concerning the suitability of invoking Article 1C(5) of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees to deal with the protracted Rwandan refugee caseload. This Article permits a declaration by countries and UNHCR that ‘the circumstances in connexion with which he [the refugee] has been recognised as a refugee have ceased to exist’, and therefore ‘he can no longer…continue to refuse to avail himself of the protection of the country of his nationality.’ In short, the ‘ceased circumstances’ Cessation Clause constitutes an international validation of positive change in post-conflict governance and the meaningful re-establishment of the citizen-state bond, as well as providing a legal normative framework for the repatria

Subjects

Africa | Fragile and Post Conflict States | International Relations | Violence and the State in Central Africa | Central Africa | Refugees | Repatriation | Rwanda | Uganda | UNHCR

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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Paying your soldiers and building the state in post-genocide Rwanda

Description

Ensuring soldiers have legal access to financial resources is crucial for the state to fulfil its primary mission: retain the monopoly of violence. As seen in the Democratic Republic of Congo, difficulties providing soldiers with adequate resources may result in deteriorating discipline, corruption, defection, and human rights abuses. Rwanda after the genocide faced the difficult task of paying its soldiers. The post-1994 situation made this challenge inescapable. The Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) took power in a ruined country. The economy was entirely destroyed, and fleeing officials of the previous regime had emptied state coffers. The resources to pay soldiers were virtually non-existent. In addition, following the RPF victory, many families returned from exile to Rwanda. Consequently,

Subjects

Africa | Economic Development | Fragile and Post Conflict States | Political Economy | Violence and the State in Central Africa | Central Africa | Military | Post-Conflict | Rwanda | Security and Insecurity | State Building | War

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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ES.253 AIDS and Poverty in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based interactive seminar on the two major issues that affect Sub-Saharan Africa: HIV/AIDS and Poverty. AIDS and Poverty, seemingly different concepts, are more inter-related to each other in Africa than in any other continent. As MIT students, we feel it is important to engage ourselves in a dynamic discussion on the relation between the two - how to fight one and how to solve the other.

Subjects

Africa | HIV | AIDS | Poverty | Zimbabwe | Botswana | Namibia | Angola | Zaire | South Africa | sub-Sahara Africa | ESG.SP253

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Shadow of the ICC: Positive Complementarity and the Situation in Kenya

Description

Professor Chandra Sriram (SOAS) gives a talk for the Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict/Changing Character of War Seminar Series. Introduced by Jennifer Welsh (Oxford). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | torture | Kenya | ICC | Africa | UN | military | politics | terrorism | war | armed conflict | 2011-10-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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HIV and children in Africa

Description

Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. Prof. Sarah Rowland-Jones' work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Her research aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity | Africa | T cells | HIV-2 | HIV-1 | infant immunology | immunity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Extreme climatic events as drivers of early human behaviour in Africa?

Description

In this seminar for the Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, Sallie Burrough of Oxford University's School of Geography and the Environment presents an environmental perspective from the Kalahari Desert (23/11/11). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Environment | anthropology | Africa | human evolution | Environment | anthropology | Africa | human evolution

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Intelligence and the Dhofar Insurgency: New Perspectives

Description

Prof Clive Jones (Leeds University) gives a talk for the Centre for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Sudan | Africa | Darfur | ethics | law | war | armed conflict | Sudan | Africa | Darfur | ethics | law | war | armed conflict | 2010-06-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT) EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | engineering | engineering | local production | local production | third world | third world | disabled | disabled | disability | disability | assistive technology | assistive technology | human power | human power | Africa | Africa | Tanzania | Tanzania | Zambia | Zambia | Kenya | Kenya | handicap | handicap | handicapped | handicapped | poverty | poverty | rural | rural | discrimination | discrimination | orthopedic | orthopedic | mobility | mobility | tricycle | tricycle | handcycle | handcycle | product design | product design | business plan | business plan | ergonomics | ergonomics | manufacturing | manufacturing | stakeholder | stakeholder | service learning | service learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Malaria and Global Health

Description

Dr Climent Casals-Pascual explains how the development of new tools to diagnose and manage malaria more effectively will allow us to decrease the mortality of this condition. Dr Climent Casals-Pascual is interested in severe malaria, particularly its diagnosis and clinical management. Clinical symptoms of severe malaria are similar to those of other diseases like pneumonia and meningitis. In tropical countries, poor diagnosis often results in sub-optimal treatments. Integrating proteomic, genomic and clinical data will help us explain differences in clinical outcome in severe malaria. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medicine | Africa | tropical diseases | malaria | developing world | Medicine | Africa | tropical diseases | malaria | developing world

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Malaria Vaccines

Description

Professor Adrian Hill has been studying the immune system and malaria susceptibility in African children for years. We asked him about his latest findings in the development of vaccines against malaria. Professor Hill develops vaccines against malaria based on inducing cellular immune responses (T lymphocytes) instead of the more commonly used stimulation of antibodies. Prophylactic vaccines developed in Oxford are now showing great promise in clinical trials. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

jenner | malaria | Africa | vaccines | developing world | tropical diseases | jenner | malaria | Africa | vaccines | developing world | tropical diseases

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT) 21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT)

Description

From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s. From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s.

Subjects

History | History | europe | europe | european | european | imperialism | imperialism | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | political | political | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | Africa | Africa | India | India | Asia | Asia | imperial expansion | imperial expansion | the rise of "scientific" racism | the rise of "scientific" racism | national identities | national identities | social class | social class | gender | gender | colonial ideologies | colonial ideologies | colonial rule | colonial rule | decolonization | decolonization | globalization | globalization | post-colonial world. | post-colonial world.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Tracing the origins of the HIV/AIDS pandemic

Description

Nuno Fario (Oxford) investigates the development of HIV since the discovery of its first, and diverse, genomes in 1959 and 1960. A medical anthropology seminar given on 7 March 2016. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medical | anthropology | aids | hiv | Africa | Medical | anthropology | aids | hiv | Africa | 2016-03-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT) SP.259 Information and Communication Technology in Africa (MIT)

Description

This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar on the development of information and communication technology in Sub-Saharan Africa. The students will seek to understand the issues surrounding designing and instituting policy, and explore the possible ways in which they can make an impact on information and communication technology in Africa.

Subjects

Information | Information | information technology | information technology | communication | communication | communication technology | communication technology | innovation | innovation | Africa | Africa | international development | international development | international aid | international aid | policy | policy | ESG.SP259 | ESG.SP259

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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