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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT) 12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT)

Description

This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since. This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since.

Subjects

African continent | African continent | Panafrican continental collisions | Panafrican continental collisions | Afro-Arabian plate | Afro-Arabian plate | African plate | African plate | Cambro-Ordovician times | Cambro-Ordovician times | geodynamic evolution | geodynamic evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.S01 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT) EC.S01 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is based on the work of the MIT-African Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI). MIT-AITI is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of information technology in today's world.MIT-AITI achieves this goal by sending MIT students to three African nations in order to teach both students and teachers through intensive classroom and lab sessions for six weeks. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-orie Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is based on the work of the MIT-African Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI). MIT-AITI is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of information technology in today's world.MIT-AITI achieves this goal by sending MIT students to three African nations in order to teach both students and teachers through intensive classroom and lab sessions for six weeks. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-orie

Subjects

information technology | information technology | IT | IT | global communities | global communities | digital divide | digital divide | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-AITI | MIT-AITI | African countries | African countries | Ethiopia | Ethiopia | Ghana | Ghana | Kenya | Kenya | IT-related issues | IT-related issues | java | java | java server pages | java server pages | JSP | JSP | programming principles | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | cutting-edge internet technology | free open-source systems | free open-source systems | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Migratory flows, colonial encounters and the histories of transatlantic slavery

Description

Olivette Otele explores how histories of transatlantic slavery impact on contemporary questions of migration Transatlantic slavery is a complex history of encounters between people of African and European descent. It is also a history of migrations, trade and subjugation. In this presentation, I look into the displacement of people from West Africa from the 17th to the 19th centuries. I ultimately aim at understanding how historians measure the impact of transatlantic slavery in Africa and its economic, social and cultural legacies. The presentation will consequently delve into Eltis? and Lovejoy?s income per capita theories and explore Manning?s loss of workforce simulation model. It will then turn to histories of the territories from which Africans were captured by looking at the r Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

African migration | slavery | development | economic development | forced migration | African migration | slavery | development | economic development | forced migration | 2017-01-25

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Hope and uncertainty in African migration: Life after deportation to Ghana

Description

IMI Visiting Fellow Nauja Kleist presents her research on return migration in the context of restrictive mobility regimes in Europe and Africa, within theories on hope, (im)mobility, social fields, gender, and belonging. Contemporary migration is characterized by a mobility paradox. The increased reach and accessibility of communication, media and transport technologies mean that people in many parts of the world are exposed to visions of the good life elsewhere while restrictive mobility regimes makes access to the global circuits of legal mobility increasingly difficult. In this paper Nauja argues that hope constitutes a productive analytical framework for studies of migration in the light of this mobility paradox, highlighting potentiality as well as uncertainty. She explores this thr Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

hope | uncertainty | African migration | Ghana | hope | uncertainty | African migration | Ghana | 2015-11-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.772 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT) SP.772 Internet Technology in Local and Global Communities (MIT)

Description

The MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI) is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of technology and to equip them with skills that will allow them to be creative, resourceful, and prosperous. The mission statement of the AITI program is based on the idea that information technology carries the potential to empower people around the globe with knowledge. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-oriented projects, and independent learning.MIT-AITI achiev The MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative (MIT-AITI) is an innovative approach by MIT students to integrate computers and internet technology into the education of students in African schools. The program focuses upon programming principles, cutting-edge internet technology, free open-source systems, and even an entrepreneurship seminar to introduce students in Africa to the power of technology and to equip them with skills that will allow them to be creative, resourceful, and prosperous. The mission statement of the AITI program is based on the idea that information technology carries the potential to empower people around the globe with knowledge. The AITI program is implemented with emphasis on classroom teaching, community-oriented projects, and independent learning.MIT-AITI achiev

Subjects

information technology | information technology | IT | IT | global communities | global communities | digital divide | digital divide | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-Africa Internet Technology Initiative | MIT-AITI | MIT-AITI | African countries | African countries | Ethiopia | Ethiopia | Ghana | Ghana | Kenya | Kenya | IT-related issues | IT-related issues | java | java | java server pages | java server pages | JSP | JSP | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | programming principles | cutting-edge internet technology | free open-source systems | free open-source systems | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Responding to Conflict in Africa: the United Nations and Regional Organizations

Description

Dr Jane Boulden discusses the different ways in which United Nations and Regional Organizations will respond to conflict in Africa. Dr Boulden draws on the findings from her edited volume 'Responding to Crisis in Africa: the United Nations and Regional Organizations' which came out in a second edition in 2013. She is Canada Research Chair in International Relations and Security Studies at the Royal Military College of Canada. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

African politics | armed conflict | regional solutions | United Nations | African politics | armed conflict | regional solutions | United Nations

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.453 Crosby Lectures in Geology: History of Africa (MIT)

Description

This course is a series of presentations on an advanced topic in the field of geology by the visiting William Otis Crosby lecturer. The Crosby lectureship is awarded to a distinguished international scientist each year to introduce new scientific perspectives to the MIT community. This year's Crosby lecturer is Prof. Kevin Burke. His lecture is about African history. The basic theme is the distinctiveness of the African continent in both the way that it originated 600 million years ago and in the way that it has developed ever since.

Subjects

African continent | Panafrican continental collisions | Afro-Arabian plate | African plate | Cambro-Ordovician times | geodynamic evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Dance | Rap | Black | visual culture | Music | African | American | history | literature | sexuality | mysogyny | feminism | performance | electronic music | activism | politics | consumerism | race | artist | political | aesthetic | musical | corporeal | visual | spoken word | literary | American cultural imagery | African American | cultural practices | material culture | performance studio | hip hop style | rapping | break | breaking | beats | dj | dee jay | turntables | mic | mc | graffiti | fashion | sex | feminist | electronica | mediated performance | anarchy | commodity fetishism | globalization | whiteness | realness | journalism | criticism | autobiography | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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What are friends for? Friendship and Public life in the post colony: African Studies Centre Annual Lecture 2013

Description

Wale Adebanwi, Associate Professor, African American and African Studies, University of California-Davies, gives the 2013 African Studies Annual Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Colonialism | African Studies | Africa | society | politics | Nigeria | Colonialism | African Studies | Africa | society | politics | Nigeria

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.350J The Anthropology of Computing (MIT) 21A.350J The Anthropology of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course examines computers anthropologically, as meaningful tools revealing the social and cultural orders that produce them. We read classic texts in computer science along with works analyzing links between machines and culture. We explore early computation theory and capitalist manufacturing; cybernetics and WWII operations research; artificial intelligence and gendered subjectivity; the creation and commodification of the personal computer; the hacking aesthetic; non-Western histories of computing; the growth of the Internet as a military, academic, and commercial project; the politics of identity in cyberspace; and the emergence of "evolutionary" computation. This course examines computers anthropologically, as meaningful tools revealing the social and cultural orders that produce them. We read classic texts in computer science along with works analyzing links between machines and culture. We explore early computation theory and capitalist manufacturing; cybernetics and WWII operations research; artificial intelligence and gendered subjectivity; the creation and commodification of the personal computer; the hacking aesthetic; non-Western histories of computing; the growth of the Internet as a military, academic, and commercial project; the politics of identity in cyberspace; and the emergence of "evolutionary" computation.

Subjects

Computing | Computing | machines and culture | machines and culture | computation theory | computation theory | cybernetics | cybernetics | operations research | operations research | artifical intelligence | artifical intelligence | personal computer | personal computer | commodification | commodification | hacking | hacking | hacker | hacker | Internet | Internet | cyberspace | cyberspace | indentity in cyberspace | indentity in cyberspace | cosmology | cosmology | clockwork | clockwork | Charles Babbage | Charles Babbage | Ada Lovelace | Ada Lovelace | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | calculating machine | calculating machine | coding | coding | cold war | cold war | Alan Turing | Alan Turing | African mathematical systems | African mathematical systems | counterculture | counterculture | PC | PC | gaming | gaming | open source | open source | free software | free software | software | software | 21A.350 | 21A.350 | SP.484 | SP.484 | STS.086 | STS.086

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Dance | Rap | Black | breaking | visual culture | Music | African | American | African-American | world music | DJ | history | literature | sexuality | misogyny | feminism | performance | electronic music | activism | politics | consumerism | race | artist | racism | turntablism | gangsta | gangster | beats | graffiti | fashion | popular culture | urban | authenticity

License

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of gender and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of gender and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization: Reggae as Transnational Culture (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization: Reggae as Transnational Culture (MIT)

Description

This course considers reggae, or Jamaican popular music more generally—in its various forms (ska, rocksteady, roots, dancehall)—as constituted by international movements and exchanges and as a product that circulates globally in complex ways. By reading across the reggae literature, as well as considering reggae texts themselves (songs, films, videos, and images), students will scrutinize the different interpretations of reggae's significance and the implications of different interpretations of the story of Jamaica and its music. Beginning with a consideration of how Jamaica's popular music industry emerged out of transnational exchanges, the course will proceed to focus on reggae's circulation outside of Jamaica via diasporic networks and commercial mediascapes. Among other This course considers reggae, or Jamaican popular music more generally—in its various forms (ska, rocksteady, roots, dancehall)—as constituted by international movements and exchanges and as a product that circulates globally in complex ways. By reading across the reggae literature, as well as considering reggae texts themselves (songs, films, videos, and images), students will scrutinize the different interpretations of reggae's significance and the implications of different interpretations of the story of Jamaica and its music. Beginning with a consideration of how Jamaica's popular music industry emerged out of transnational exchanges, the course will proceed to focus on reggae's circulation outside of Jamaica via diasporic networks and commercial mediascapes. Among other

Subjects

reggae | reggae | world culture | world culture | globalization | globalization | Rastafari | Rastafari | Jamaica | Jamaica | Caribbean music | Caribbean music | African diaspora | African diaspora | hip-hop | hip-hop | identity | identity | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | nationalism | nationalism | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | religion | religion | Bob Marley | Bob Marley | dancehall | dancehall | reggaeton | reggaeton | roots | roots | ska | ska

License

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21M.294 Popular Musics of the World (MIT) 21M.294 Popular Musics of the World (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on popular music, i.e. music created for and transmitted by mass media. Various popular music genres from around the world will be studied through listening, reading and written assignments, with an emphasis on class discussion. In particular, we will consider issues of musical change, syncretism, Westernization, globalization, the impact of recording industries, and the post-colonial era. Case studies will include Afro-pop, reggae, bhangra, rave, and global hip-hop. This course focuses on popular music, i.e. music created for and transmitted by mass media. Various popular music genres from around the world will be studied through listening, reading and written assignments, with an emphasis on class discussion. In particular, we will consider issues of musical change, syncretism, Westernization, globalization, the impact of recording industries, and the post-colonial era. Case studies will include Afro-pop, reggae, bhangra, rave, and global hip-hop.

Subjects

world music | world music | pop music | pop music | globalization | globalization | recording | recording | Afro-pop | Afro-pop | afropop | afropop | reggae | reggae | bhangra | bhangra | rave | rave | hip-hop | hip-hop | enthnomusicology | enthnomusicology | world beat | world beat | Senegal | Senegal | FelaKuti | FelaKuti | African music | African music | Paul Simon | Paul Simon | Graceland | Graceland | rap | rap | rap music | rap music | dance | dance | anthropology | anthropology | japanese pop | japanese pop | Egypt | Egypt | Egyptian pop | Egyptian pop | techno | techno | youth culture | youth culture | karaoke | karaoke | ska | ska | dancehall | dancehall | Bob Marley | Bob Marley

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.410 Vocal Repertoire and Performance: African American Composers (MIT) 21M.410 Vocal Repertoire and Performance: African American Composers (MIT)

Description

The primary focus of this Vocal Repertoire and Performance course is placed upon the works of African American composers and concert artists. Students gather biographical data and explore art songs, operatic arias, ensembles, choral masterpieces, and arrangements employing sacred and secular texts. Additionally, students conduct inquiry into works representative of their own heritage. This course is required for vocalists in the MIT Emerson Music Performance program; others may be admitted by audition. The primary focus of this Vocal Repertoire and Performance course is placed upon the works of African American composers and concert artists. Students gather biographical data and explore art songs, operatic arias, ensembles, choral masterpieces, and arrangements employing sacred and secular texts. Additionally, students conduct inquiry into works representative of their own heritage. This course is required for vocalists in the MIT Emerson Music Performance program; others may be admitted by audition.

Subjects

vocal repertoire | vocal repertoire | vocal performance | vocal performance | African American composers | African American composers | spirituals | spirituals | black composers | black composers

License

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Being Different Together: Case studies on diversity interventions in some South African organisations

Description

Authors:  Melissa Steyn (Ed.) There are few contexts where people are not confronted by difference in the work¬place, in organisations and public spaces, and as an aspect of the general body politic. Clicked 221 times. Last clicked 08/22/2014 - 09:26. Teaching & Learning Context:  <p>This textbook is intended for students and educators of Human Resource Management, Organisational and Management studies. It is also relevant for diversity practitioners based in South African and international contexts.</p>

Subjects

Intercultural and Diversity Studies | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Video | Textbooks | English | Post-secondary | diversity | Diversity interventions | South African organisations | South African transformation

License

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The 2014 Library Survival Guide

Description

Authors:  Alex d'Angelo This guide will help you to find full text electronic information for tutorials and essays. Clicked 116 times. Last clicked 01/27/2015 - 18:33. Teaching & Learning Context:  This resource is useful for all students new to the library.

Subjects

African Cinema Unit | Humanities | Downloadable Documents | Training Materials | English | Secondary | electronic information | University of Cape Town | University of Cape Town libraries

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