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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT) 21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates. This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | English background | American Revolution effects | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | pamphlets | correspondence | correspondence | resistance organizations | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | constitutional documents | debates | debates | colonial resistance | colonial resistance | republicanism | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln. This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln.

Subjects

A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | the American Revolution and its impact | the American Revolution and its impact | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | history | popular culture | united states | marketing | mass-production | consumption | economics | politics | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | good lif | leisure | material abundance | department stores | advertising | mass-produced cars | suburbs | American economy | American society | American politics | mass market | turn of the century | middle-class society | interwar America | mass culture | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | good life | cars | automobiles | vehicles | window | storefront | store | shop | showroom | dealers | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007J After Columbus (MIT) 21L.007J After Columbus (MIT)

Description

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres

Subjects

21L.007 | 21L.007 | 21G.020 | 21G.020 | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north | america | north | america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report | north america | north america | New World | New World | America | America | Native Americans | Native Americans | English | English | Europeans | Europeans | North America | North America | literary transformations | literary transformations | nation | nation | captivity narratives | captivity narratives | Michel Montaigne | Michel Montaigne | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Jean de L?ry | Jean de L?ry | Daniel Defoe | Daniel Defoe | Mary Rowlandson | Mary Rowlandson | Derek Walcott | Derek Walcott | J. M. Coetzee | J. M. Coetzee | Christopher Columbus | Christopher Columbus | 21F.020J | 21F.020J | 21F.020 | 21F.020

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel. What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subjects

American authors | American authors | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | autobiography | autobiography | biography | biography | memoir | memoir | family | family | American culture | American culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

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21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT) 21H.802 Modern Latin America, 1808-Present: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy (MIT)

Description

This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity. This class is a selective survey of Latin American history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Issues studied include Latin America in the global economy, relations between Latin America and the U.S., dictatorships and democracies in the twentieth century, African and Indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, revolution in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, and Latin American identity.

Subjects

Latin America | Latin America | wars of independence | wars of independence | global economy | global economy | dictatorship | dictatorship | democracy | democracy | Mexico | Mexico | Cuba | Cuba | Central America | Central America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT) STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | America | America | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment | native American | native American | railroad | railroad | transportation | transportation | aesthetics | aesthetics | colonial history | colonial history | Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl | National Parks | National Parks | water | water | drought | drought | natural resources | natural resources | food | food | materialism | materialism | capitalism | capitalism | organic food | organic food | photography | photography | film | film

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | nineteenth century | 1800s | novel | great books | literary canon | American authors | colonial America | native American | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | United States | culture | historical context | African-American | authors | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | Civil War | Walt Whitman | gender | race | social | political | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography

Subjects

race | race | gender | gender | Asian American literature | Asian American literature | history | history | cinema | cinema | media images of Asian American men and women | media images of Asian American men and women | feminism | feminism | gender roles | gender roles | interracial romance | interracial romance | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | David Henry Hwang | David Henry Hwang | Chang Rae-lee | Chang Rae-lee | Jessica Hagedorn | Jessica Hagedorn | Shirley Lim | Shirley Lim | Mira Nair | Mira Nair | Ang Lee | Ang Lee | Wayne Wang | Wayne Wang | Gurinder Chadha | Gurinder Chadha | WMN.421J | WMN.421J | 21H.153 | 21H.153 | SP.421 | SP.421 | WMN.421 | WMN.421

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison. This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | poetry | poetry | America | America | American | American | independence | independence | Melville | Melville | Twain | Twain | Morrison | Morrison | realism | realism | satire | satire | history | history | biography | biography | Emerson | Emerson | Hawthorne | Hawthorne | Thoreau | Thoreau | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Wharton | Wharton | Hurston | Hurston | Rowlandson | Rowlandson | Douglass | Douglass

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT)

Description

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs. This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | America | America | American | American | strangers | strangers | maps | maps | timeline | timeline | genealogy | genealogy | literary analysis | literary analysis | fiction | fiction | Moby-Dick | Moby-Dick | Melville | Melville | Jacobs | Jacobs | Twain | Twain | Wharton | Wharton | Faulkner | Faulkner | Morrison | Morrison | Butler | Butler

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future. This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | city | suburbs | suburbs | suburban sprawl | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | American metropolis | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | Boston | Boston | industrial cities | industrial cities | housing | housing | workplaces | workplaces | urban planning | urban planning | public spaces | public spaces | performance zoning | performance zoning | land use regulation | land use regulation | urban renewal | urban renewal | American public housing | American public housing | privatization | privatization | New Urbanism | New Urbanism | heritage areas | heritage areas | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | community activism | community activism | urban utopias | urban utopias | development controls | development controls | 11.001 | 11.001 | 4.250 | 4.250

License

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