Searching for American : 253 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT) 21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates. This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | English background | American Revolution effects | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | pamphlets | correspondence | correspondence | resistance organizations | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | constitutional documents | debates | debates | colonial resistance | colonial resistance | republicanism | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.112 The American Revolution (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government. Topics covered include: English and American backgrounds of the Revolution; issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict; colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism; the Revolutionary War; constitution writing for the states and nation; and effects of the American Revolution. Readings emphasize documents from the period--pamphlets, correspondence, the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations, constitutional documents and debates.

Subjects

English and American backgrounds of the Revolution | issues and arguments in the Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance and the beginnings of republicanism | the Revolutionary War | constitution writing for the states and nation | and effects of the American Revolution | Concerned primarily with the revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | the minutes or resolutions of resistance organizations | constitutional documents and debates | English background | American Revolution effects | Anglo-American conflict | colonial resistance | republicanism | constitution writing | revolutionary origins of American government | pamphlets | correspondence | resistance organizations | constitutional documents | debates | colonial resistance | republicanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT) 21L.512 American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir (MIT)

Description

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel. What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subjects

American authors | American authors | captivity narrative | captivity narrative | autobiography | autobiography | biography | biography | memoir | memoir | family | family | American culture | American culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln. This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subjects

American colonies | American colonies | Civil War | Civil War | Spanish colonization | Spanish colonization | British empire | British empire | American Revolution | American Revolution | Declaration of Independence | Declaration of Independence | U.S. Constitution | U.S. Constitution | ratification | ratification | secession | secession | Bill of Rights | Bill of Rights | John Winthrop | John Winthrop | Thomas Paine | Thomas Paine | Thomas Jefferson | Thomas Jefferson | James Madison | James Madison | William H. Garrison | William H. Garrison | George Fitzhugh | George Fitzhugh | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Abraham Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Andrew Jackson | Andrew Jackson | George Mason | George Mason | abolition | abolition | Federalism | Federalism | slavery | slavery | Constitutional Convention | Constitutional Convention

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT) 21H.101 American History to 1865 (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln. This course focuses on a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. The colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact are examined. Readings include writings of the period by Winthrop, Paine, Jefferson, Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and Lincoln.

Subjects

A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | A basic history of American social | economic | and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | colonial heritages of Spanish and British America | the American Revolution and its impact | the American Revolution and its impact | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the establishment and growth of the new nation | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | the Civil War | its background | character | and impact | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln | writings of the period by Winthrop | Paine | Jefferson | Madison | W. H. Garrison | G. Fitzhugh | H. B. Stowe | and Lincoln

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography

Subjects

race | race | gender | gender | Asian American literature | Asian American literature | history | history | cinema | cinema | media images of Asian American men and women | media images of Asian American men and women | feminism | feminism | gender roles | gender roles | interracial romance | interracial romance | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | David Henry Hwang | David Henry Hwang | Chang Rae-lee | Chang Rae-lee | Jessica Hagedorn | Jessica Hagedorn | Shirley Lim | Shirley Lim | Mira Nair | Mira Nair | Ang Lee | Ang Lee | Wayne Wang | Wayne Wang | Gurinder Chadha | Gurinder Chadha | WMN.421J | WMN.421J | 21H.153 | 21H.153 | SP.421 | SP.421 | WMN.421 | WMN.421

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT) 11.001J Introduction to Urban Design and Development (MIT)

Description

This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future. This is a class about how cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas change.   It is an introductory subject for undergraduates that examines both the evolving structure of the American metropolis and the ways that it  can be designed and developed. Topics range from grand ideas proposed by single individuals to smaller more incremental processes carried out through collaboration by a variety of contending parties.  You will see how cities and suburbs have been changed in the past and how you and others may help change them in the future.

Subjects

city | city | suburbs | suburbs | suburban sprawl | suburban sprawl | American metropolis | American metropolis | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | Boston | Boston | industrial cities | industrial cities | housing | housing | workplaces | workplaces | urban planning | urban planning | public spaces | public spaces | performance zoning | performance zoning | land use regulation | land use regulation | urban renewal | urban renewal | American public housing | American public housing | privatization | privatization | New Urbanism | New Urbanism | heritage areas | heritage areas | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | community activism | community activism | urban utopias | urban utopias | development controls | development controls | 11.001 | 11.001 | 4.250 | 4.250

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | writing | early American | lives | gender | race | nation | faith | Nineteenth century | legislation | economics | slavery | narratives | orations | letters | poems | Native American | English | Anglo-American | African | Afro-American

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | history | popular culture | united states | marketing | mass-production | consumption | economics | politics | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | good lif | leisure | material abundance | department stores | advertising | mass-produced cars | suburbs | American economy | American society | American politics | mass market | turn of the century | middle-class society | interwar America | mass culture | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | good life | cars | automobiles | vehicles | window | storefront | store | shop | showroom | dealers | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Stowe, Twain, and the Transformation of 19th-Century America (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between. This seminar looks at two bestselling nineteenth-century American authors whose works made the subject of slavery popular among mainstream readers. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain have subsequently become canonized and reviled, embraced and banned by individuals and groups at both ends of the political and cultural spectrum and everywhere in between.

Subjects

Nineteenth-century | Nineteenth-century | American | American | authors | authors | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Martin Delany | Martin Delany | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | Dred | Dred | Frances E. W. Harper | Frances E. W. Harper | Charles Chesnutt | Charles Chesnutt | Civil War | Civil War | Pudd'nhead Wilson | Pudd'nhead Wilson | racial tensions | racial tensions | social | social | political | political | realities. | realities.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

An international episode An international episode

Description

ebook version of An international episode ebook version of An international episode

Subjects

kind | kind | American fiction -- 19th century | American fiction -- 19th century | Short stories | American -- 19th century | Short stories | American -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://www.ota.ox.ac.uk/catalogue/epubfeed.rss

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

S IMPACT ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS S IMPACT ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Description

It is slowly dawning on us all that Donald Trump was right when he said that the American election day ‘will be Brexit times 10’. In my experience, 4,000 miles across the Atlantic, people looked ten times more shocked when they saw Trump give a victory speech than when it became clear that their country had decided to leave the European Union. Much has been written about Trump’s hateful rhetoric, which has offended 282 people and places on twitter alone, and the possible ramifications of his breaking long-established domestic norms. But it is the global implications of a Trump presidency ... It is slowly dawning on us all that Donald Trump was right when he said that the American election day ‘will be Brexit times 10’. In my experience, 4,000 miles across the Atlantic, people looked ten times more shocked when they saw Trump give a victory speech than when it became clear that their country had decided to leave the European Union. Much has been written about Trump’s hateful rhetoric, which has offended 282 people and places on twitter alone, and the possible ramifications of his breaking long-established domestic norms. But it is the global implications of a Trump presidency ...

Subjects

International Relations | International Relations | Special Series | Special Series | USA Decides 2016 | USA Decides 2016 | American elections | American elections | American foreign policy | American foreign policy | Brett | Brett | Donald Trump | Donald Trump | international relations | international relations | Political Theory | Political Theory

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://politicsinspires.org/feed/

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT) 21M.670 Traditions in American Concert Dance: Gender and Autobiography (MIT)

Description

This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists. This course explores the forms, contents, and context of world traditions in dance that played a crucial role in shaping American concert dance. For example, we will identify dances from an African American vernacular tradition that were transferred from the social space to the concert stage. We will explore the artistic lives of such American dance artists as Katherine Dunham, Pearl Primus, and Alvin Ailey along with Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, George Balanchine, and Merce Cunningham as American dance innovators. Of particular importance to our investigation will be the construction of gender and autobiography that lie at the heart of concert dance practice, and the ways in which these qualities have been choreographed by American artists.

Subjects

WGS.591 | WGS.591 | world traditions in dance | world traditions in dance | American concert dance | American concert dance | gender | gender | autobiography | autobiography | Katherine Dunham | Katherine Dunham | Alvin Ailey | Alvin Ailey | Isadora Duncan | Isadora Duncan | Martha Graham | Martha Graham | George Balanchine | George Balanchine | American dance | American dance | choreography | choreography | race | race | sex | sex | student work | student work

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of gender and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of gender and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

An American Constitutional History Course for Non American Students An American Constitutional History Course for Non American Students

Description

This course provides an overview of the American Constitutional History, and it is aimed to Law students primarily in countries outside of the Anglo-Saxon legal system. This course provides an overview of the American Constitutional History, and it is aimed to Law students primarily in countries outside of the Anglo-Saxon legal system.

Subjects

New Deal | New Deal | Colonial Origins | Colonial Origins | Reconstruction Era | Reconstruction Era | Civil Rights | Civil Rights | Historia del Derecho y de las Instituciones | Historia del Derecho y de las Instituciones | Progressive Era | Progressive Era | American Constitutional History | American Constitutional History | Process of Federation | Process of Federation | Civil War | Civil War | Grado en Derecho | Grado en Derecho | American Constitutionalism | American Constitutionalism | First Changes to the Constitution | First Changes to the Constitution | Constitutions of the Revolution | Constitutions of the Revolution | 2012 | 2012

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.uc3m.es/ocwuniversia/rss_all

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata