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21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | East Asian Cultures | East Asian Cultures | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Japanese culture | Japanese culture | Korean culture | Korean culture | cultural antropology | cultural antropology | foodways | foodways | East Asian Studies | East Asian Studies | traditional East Asian studies | traditional East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | Confucianism | Confucianism | Buddhism | Buddhism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

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21G.030 East Asian Culture: From Zen to K-Pop (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to various forms of culture in East Asia (focusing on China, Japan and Korea), including both traditional and contemporary examples. Critically examines the shared cultural elements that are widely considered to constitute "East Asian culture," and also the diversity within East Asia, historically and today. Examples include religious and philosophical beliefs (Confucianism and Buddhism), literature, art, food, architecture, and popular culture. The study of gender will be an integral part of this subject. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the U.S. are also considered. This class is suitable for students of all levels, and requires no Asian language background. Students who wish to fulfill the MISTI-Singapore requirement m

Subjects

East Asia | East Asian Cultures | Chinese culture | Japanese culture | Korean culture | cultural antropology | foodways | East Asian Studies | traditional East Asian studies | contemporary East Asian studies | Confucianism | Buddhism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | history | anthropology | film | cultural studies | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | media racism | affirmative action | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | violence | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century and working our way up to the present. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, and the "cultural defense." The study of Asian Americans in film will form a significant component of this course. The class will require a final group project of 20-40 pages (depending on group size). In addition, there will be brief oral presentations and writing assignments during the course of the semester, and a bibliography

Subjects

race | race | gender | gender | Asian American literature | Asian American literature | history | history | cinema | cinema | media images of Asian American men and women | media images of Asian American men and women | feminism | feminism | gender roles | gender roles | interracial romance | interracial romance | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | David Henry Hwang | David Henry Hwang | Chang Rae-lee | Chang Rae-lee | Jessica Hagedorn | Jessica Hagedorn | Shirley Lim | Shirley Lim | Mira Nair | Mira Nair | Ang Lee | Ang Lee | Wayne Wang | Wayne Wang | Gurinder Chadha | Gurinder Chadha | WMN.421J | WMN.421J | 21H.153 | 21H.153 | SP.421 | SP.421 | WMN.421 | WMN.421

License

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | democracy | economic development | economic development | politics | politics | Germany | Germany | Iraq | Iraq | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | Middle East | Middle East | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | South Asia | South Asia | East Asia | East Asia | Greece | Greece | Aristotle | Aristotle | foreign affairs | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | democratic institution | social divisions | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Karl Marx | Communist Party | Communist Party | leadership | leadership | polarization | polarization | gridlock | gridlock | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | imposed sovereignty | Austri | Austri | regime breakdown | regime breakdown | Brazil | Brazil | capitalism | capitalism | industrial policy | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | women's suffrage | Athens | Athens | the Constitution | the Constitution | reform | reform | presidentialism | presidentialism | federalism | federalism | bicameralism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Alumni Weekend in Asia 2014: Does the 21st Century belong to Asia?

Description

Will this be the Asian Century? Four leading voices from Oxford University debate this motion, moderated by the Chancellor, Lord Patten of Barnes. For the motion: Rana Mitter, Director of the Oxford China Centre and Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China Linda Yueh, Chief Business Correspondent for the BBC and Fellow of St Edmund Hall Against the motion: Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government Peter Tufano, Dean of the Said Business School Moderator: University Chancellor, Lord Patten of Barnes Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Oxford Alumni Weekend | Oxford Asia | Oxford Hong Kong | Asian century | Oxford Alumni Weekend | Oxford Asia | Oxford Hong Kong | Asian century

License

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | feminism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT) 21M.621 Theater and Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (MIT)

Description

This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions. This course explores contemporary American theatrical expression as it may be organized around issues of ethnic and cultural identity. This exploration will include the analysis of performances, scripts, and video documentation, as well as the invention of original documents of theatrical expression. Class lectures and discussions will analyze samples of Native American, Chicano, African American, and Asian American theater, taking into consideration the historical and political context for the creation of these works. Performance exercises will help students identify theatrical forms and techniques used by these theaters, and how these techniques contribute to the overall goals of specific theatrical expressions.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | Culture | Culture | Diversity | Diversity | Performance | Performance | American | American | African | African | Asian | Asian | Script | Script | Video | Video | Chicano | Chicano | Native American | Native American | Political | Political | Act | Act | Dance | Dance | diversity | diversity | united states | united states | gender | gender

License

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | rice | bowl | Chinese | East Asia | ordinary people | nineteenth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | primary sources | films | textbook | individual | family | lives | change | modern | readings | discussions | political events | daily | decisions | large-scale | social | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT) 4.605 Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture (MIT)

Description

This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic. This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic.

Subjects

vernacular architecture | vernacular architecture | ancient civilizations | ancient civilizations | urbanism | urbanism | cities | cities | buildings | buildings | design principles | design principles | architecture analysis | architecture analysis | classical civilizations | classical civilizations | Greece | Greece | Rome | Rome | Asia | Asia | Islam | Islam | cathedrals | cathedrals

License

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14.54 International Trade (MIT) 14.54 International Trade (MIT)

Description

The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest. The course will help us understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. The subject is one of the oldest fields in economics and is extremely topical at the moment, with the ongoing debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the large current account deficits of the US, the prospects for exchange rates, and the calls for a new global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. In the course we will both cover the basic tools and some topics of current interest.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | international | international | trade | trade | goods | goods | countries | countries | savings | savings | investments | investments | international finance | international finance | globalization | globalization | free trade | free trade | t deficits | t deficits | United States | United States | exchange rates | exchange rates | financial crises | financial crises | East Asia | East Asia | Argentina | Argentina

License

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21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT) 21H.443 European Imperialism in the 19th and 20th Centuries (MIT)

Description

From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s. From pineapples grown in Hawaii to English-speaking call centers outsourced to India, the legacy of the "Age of Imperialism" appears everywhere in our modern world. This class explores the history of European imperialism in its political, economic, and cultural dimensions from the 1840s through the 1960s.

Subjects

History | History | europe | europe | european | european | imperialism | imperialism | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | political | political | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | Africa | Africa | India | India | Asia | Asia | imperial expansion | imperial expansion | the rise of "scientific" racism | the rise of "scientific" racism | national identities | national identities | social class | social class | gender | gender | colonial ideologies | colonial ideologies | colonial rule | colonial rule | decolonization | decolonization | globalization | globalization | post-colonial world. | post-colonial world.

License

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

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14.54 International Trade (MIT) 14.54 International Trade (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with applications to current policy issues. In this course we will cover the basic tools to understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. We will also cover applications to a number of topics of current interest, including the debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the U.S. current account deficit, the medium run prospects for exchange rates, European integration, and the debate on global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina. This course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with applications to current policy issues. In this course we will cover the basic tools to understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. We will also cover applications to a number of topics of current interest, including the debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the U.S. current account deficit, the medium run prospects for exchange rates, European integration, and the debate on global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina.

Subjects

theory of international trade | theory of international trade | finance | finance | policy | policy | flow of goods | flow of goods | flow of savings and investments | flow of savings and investments | globalization | globalization | free trade agreements | free trade agreements | the US current account deficit | the US current account deficit | exchange rates | exchange rates | European integration | European integration | global financial architecture | global financial architecture | financial crises | financial crises | East Asia | East Asia | Argentina | Argentina

License

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STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | economic development | politics | Germany | Iraq | Mexico | United States | Middle East | Latin America | Africa | South Asia | East Asia | Greece | Aristotle | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Communist Party | leadership | polarization | gridlock | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | Austri | regime breakdown | Brazil | capitalism | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | Athens | the Constitution | reform | presidentialism | federalism | bicameralism

License

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

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21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT) 21G.022J International Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of wom

Subjects

21G.022 | 21G.022 | WGS.141 | WGS.141 | Women | Women | International | International | Global | Global | Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Writers | Writers | Asia | Asia | Africa | Africa | Middle east | Middle east | Latin america | Latin america | North america | North america | Non-western | Non-western | Gender roles | Gender roles | Culture | Culture | Heritage | Heritage | Female | Female | History | History | Colonialism | Colonialism | Religion | Religion | Nationalism | Nationalism | Socialization | Socialization | Language | Language | Patriarchal | Patriarchal | Sex | Sex | Marriage | Marriage | Politics | Politics | Love | Love | Work | Work | Identity | Identity | Fiction | Fiction | literature | literature | SP.461J | SP.461J | WMN.461J | WMN.461J | SP.461 | SP.461 | WMN.461 | WMN.461

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STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | complex interrelationships | humans | natural environments | conflict | access | land rights | hunting | fishing | environmental regulations | scientific | popular | knowledge | biotechnology | hazardous waste | social | economic | political | environmental | stakes | forest | agricultural | marine | urban | cultural | historical | power relationships | local | national | international levels. nature | European thought | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | East Africa | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | North America

License

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15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific (MIT) 15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific (MIT)

Description

15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on the Asia-Pacific region. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world. 15.389A Global Entrepreneurship Lab: Asia-Pacific enables teams of students to work with the top management of global start-ups and gain experience in running, and consulting to, a new enterprise outside the United States. The focus is on start-ups operating in emerging markets throughout the world, with a special focus on the Asia-Pacific region. The course combines an internship in a growing firm with in-class discussions of the issues and policies that affect the climate for innovation and start-up success around the world.

Subjects

entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | developing markets | developing markets | corruption | corruption | entrepreneurial | entrepreneurial | internationalization | internationalization | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneurial finance | entrepreneur | entrepreneur | venture capital | venture capital | commercialization | commercialization | organizational development | organizational development | Asia-Pacific | Asia-Pacific

License

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