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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms.

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | Austen | Austen | Dickens | Dickens | Conrad | Conrad | Woolfe | Woolfe | Charters | Charters | literature | literature | novel | novel | narrative | narrative | verbal text | verbal text | culture | culture | prose narrative | prose narrative | short stories | short stories | short story | short story | critical analysis | critical analysis | literary response | literary response | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | Joseph Conrad | Joseph Conrad | literary interpretation | literary interpretation | close analysis | close analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT) SP.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT)

Description

This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and c This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and c

Subjects

women's novels | women's novels | literature | literature | Edith Wharton | Edith Wharton | The House of Mirth | The House of Mirth | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison | Jazz | Jazz | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Alice Walker | Alice Walker | The Color Purple | The Color Purple | Charlotte Bronte | Charlotte Bronte | Jane Eyre | Jane Eyre | Sheri Reynolds | Sheri Reynolds | The Rapture of Canaan | The Rapture of Canaan | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Pride and Prejudice | Pride and Prejudice | Sylvia Plath | Sylvia Plath | The Bell Jar | The Bell Jar | ESG.SP260 | ESG.SP260

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin. This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin.

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | Austen | Austen | Dickens | Dickens | Conrad | Conrad | Woolfe | Woolfe | Charters | Charters | literature | literature | novel | novel | narrative | narrative | verbal text | verbal text | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays. This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | humor | drama | drama | narrative | narrative | genre | genre | literary history | literary history | irony | irony | comic | comic | slapstick | slapstick | satire | satire | wit | wit | trickster | trickster | allegory | allegory | transgression | transgression | social commentary | social commentary | political commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Aristophanes | Moliere | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms.

Subjects

Fiction | Writing | Austen | Dickens | Conrad | Woolfe | Charters | literature | novel | narrative | verbal text | culture | prose narrative | short stories | short story | critical analysis | literary response | Virginia Woolf | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens | Joseph Conrad | literary interpretation | close analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | English literature | Novel | Novel | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Twentieth | Modernity | Modernity | Narrative | Narrative | Social criticism | Social criticism | Realism | Realism | Romance | Romance | Romantic | Romantic | Subjectivity | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | George Eliot | James Joyce | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works. This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | literature | fiction | fiction | reading | reading | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | prose narrative | short stories | short stories | novels | novels | literary response | literary response | literary analysis | literary analysis | art | art | war | war | verbal texts | verbal texts | narrative styles | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past

Description

This free course, History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past, consists of a series of essays, drawn from material contained in the Reading Experience Database, that illustrate different aspects of reading in Britain during the period from 1450 to 1945. These essays are designed for you as the reader to dip in and dip out, allowing you to pick which essays best suits your purpose. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past, consists of a series of essays, drawn from material contained in the Reading Experience Database, that illustrate different aspects of reading in Britain during the period from 1450 to 1945. These essays are designed for you as the reader to dip in and dip out, allowing you to pick which essays best suits your purpose. First published on Thu, 17 Mar 2016 as History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Literature and Creative Writing | Literature and Creative Writing | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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ES.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT) ES.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT)

Description

This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and conce This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and conce

Subjects

women's novels | women's novels | literature | literature | Edith Wharton | Edith Wharton | The House of Mirth | The House of Mirth | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison | Jazz | Jazz | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Alice Walker | Alice Walker | The Color Purple | The Color Purple | Charlotte Bronte | Charlotte Bronte | Jane Eyre | Jane Eyre | Sheri Reynolds | Sheri Reynolds | The Rapture of Canaan | The Rapture of Canaan | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Pride and Prejudice | Pride and Prejudice | Sylvia Plath | Sylvia Plath | The Bell Jar | The Bell Jar | ESG.SP260 | ESG.SP260

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past

Description

This free course consists of a series of essays drawn from material contained in the Reading Experience Database that illustrate different aspects of reading in Britain during the period from 1450 to 1945. These essays are designed for you as the reader to dip in and dip out allowing you to pick which essays best suits your purpose.

Subjects

Literature and Creative Writing | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin.

Subjects

Fiction | Writing | Austen | Dickens | Conrad | Woolfe | Charters | literature | novel | narrative | verbal text | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molire, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | drama | narrative | genre | literary history | irony | comic | slapstick | satire | wit | trickster | allegory | transgression | social commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT)

Description

This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and c

Subjects

women's novels | literature | Edith Wharton | The House of Mirth | Toni Morrison | Jazz | Virginia Woolf | Mrs. Dalloway | Alice Walker | The Color Purple | Charlotte Bronte | Jane Eyre | Sheri Reynolds | The Rapture of Canaan | Jane Austen | Pride and Prejudice | Sylvia Plath | The Bell Jar | ESG.SP260

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | fiction | reading | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | short stories | novels | literary response | literary analysis | art | war | verbal texts | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | prose | fiction | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sensibility | historical novel | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Introduction to Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles--traditional and innovative, western and nonwestern--and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms. Toward the end of the term, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between art and war in a diverse selection of works.

Subjects

literature | fiction | reading | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Herman Melville | Kate Chopin | Leo Tolstoy | Virginia Woolf | Nora Okja Keller | Oscar Wilde | prose narrative | short stories | novels | literary response | literary analysis | art | war | verbal texts | narrative styles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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History of reading: An introduction to reading in the past

Description

This free course consists of a series of essays drawn from material contained in the Reading Experience Database that illustrate different aspects of reading in Britain during the period from 1450 to 1945. These essays are designed for you as the reader to dip in and dip out allowing you to pick which essays best suits your purpose.

Subjects

The Arts | Jane Austen | Charles Dickens

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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ES.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT)

Description

This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Bront, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and conce

Subjects

women's novels | literature | Edith Wharton | The House of Mirth | Toni Morrison | Jazz | Virginia Woolf | Mrs. Dalloway | Alice Walker | The Color Purple | Charlotte Bronte | Jane Eyre | Sheri Reynolds | The Rapture of Canaan | Jane Austen | Pride and Prejudice | Sylvia Plath | The Bell Jar | ESG.SP260

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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