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1

Is Tragedy still Alive? (Transcript)

Description

Discussion on whether tragedy still exists in modern culture, whether in films, modern theatre or and other creative arts.

Subjects

history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett | history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT) 21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT)

Description

In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | O'Neill | O'Neill | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Friel | Friel | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT) 21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia. This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | Pirandello | Pirandello | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Hwang | Hwang | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Frayn | Frayn | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Is Tragedy still Alive?

Description

Discussion on whether tragedy still exists in modern culture, whether in films, modern theatre or and other creative arts. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett | history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129133/audio.xml

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT) 21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic. This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Fiction | Drama | Drama | Poetry | Poetry | Joyce | Joyce | Yeats | Yeats | Bolger | Bolger | Beckett | Beckett | O'Brien | O'Brien | Trevor | Trevor | Lavin | Lavin | McGahern | McGahern | Dorcey | Dorcey | Doyle | Doyle | Berkeley | Berkeley | Friel | Friel | Heaney | Heaney | Crotty | Crotty | Boland | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Meehan | Carr | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th 21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 21G.031 | 4.608 | 4.608 | avante garde | avante garde | kulturindustrie | kulturindustrie | germany | germany | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | africa | africa | europe | europe | culture | culture | consumer | consumer | history | history | politics | politics | Adorno | Adorno | Aragon | Aragon | Bataille | Bataille | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Breton | Breton | B?rger | B?rger | Duchamp | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Eisenstein | Ernst | Ernst | J?nger | J?nger | Greenberg | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Kandinsky | Malevich | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Mayakovsky | Tzara | Tzara | cinema | cinema | movies | movies | film | film | music | music | literature | literature | French culture | French culture | German culture | German culture | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | surrealism | surrealism | dadaism | dadaism | art history | art history | France | France | art movements | art movements | futurism | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031J | 21F.031 | 21F.031

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

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21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet

Subjects

avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031 | 4.608

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21F.xml

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Drama | Poetry | Joyce | Yeats | Bolger | Beckett | O'Brien | Trevor | Lavin | McGahern | Dorcey | Doyle | Berkeley | Friel | Heaney | Crotty | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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21G.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21G.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in th

Subjects

21G.031 | 4.608 | avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031J | 21F.031

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.488 Contemporary Literature (MIT)

Description

This semester, Contemporary Literature (21L.488) deals with Irish literature, a subject broad and deep. To achieve a manageable volume of study, the course focuses primarily on poetry and prose, at drama's expense, and on living writers, at the expense of their predecessors. Each class session follows a discussion format, often with students assigned to lead-off or summarize the day's topic.

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Irish literature | Fiction | Drama | Poetry | Joyce | Yeats | Bolger | Beckett | O'Brien | Trevor | Lavin | McGahern | Dorcey | Doyle | Berkeley | Friel | Heaney | Crotty | Boland | Dhomhnaill | Meehan | Carr

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT)

Description

In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | O'Neill | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Churchill | Wilson | Friel | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21F.031J Topics in the Avant-Garde in Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

21F.031 examines the terms "avant garde" and "Kulturindustrie" in French and German culture of the early twentieth century. Considering the origins of these concepts in surrealist and dadaist literature, art, and cinema, the course then expands to engage parallel formations across Europe, particularly in the former Soviet Union. Emphasis on the specific historical conditions that enabled these interventions. Guiding questions are these: What was original about the historical avant-garde? What connections between art and revolution did avant-garde writers and artists imagine? What strategies did they deploy to meet their modernist imperatives? To what extent did their projects maintain a critical stance towards the culture industry? Surveying key interventions in the fields of poet

Subjects

avante garde | kulturindustrie | germany | asia | latin america | africa | europe | culture | consumer | history | politics | Adorno | Aragon | Bataille | Beckett | Brecht | Breton | B?rger | Duchamp | Eisenstein | Ernst | J?nger | Greenberg | Kandinsky | Malevich | Mayakovsky | Tzara | cinema | movies | film | music | literature | French culture | German culture | 20th century | twentieth century | surrealism | dadaism | art history | France | art movements | futurism | 21F.031 | 4.608

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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