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SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT) WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | WGS.301 | 17.007 | 17.007 | 24.237 | 24.237 | feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | Humanist approach | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | Dominance approach | social construction | social construction | liberal | liberal | subjection | subjection | female | female | politics | politics | pornography | pornography | lesbian | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | Butler | domestic violence | domestic violence | prejudice | prejudice | queer theory | queer theory | masculinity | masculinity | epistemic injustice | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT)

Description

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs. This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | America | America | American | American | strangers | strangers | maps | maps | timeline | timeline | genealogy | genealogy | literary analysis | literary analysis | fiction | fiction | Moby-Dick | Moby-Dick | Melville | Melville | Jacobs | Jacobs | Twain | Twain | Wharton | Wharton | Faulkner | Faulkner | Morrison | Morrison | Butler | Butler

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well. William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | Irish poetry | poetry | poetry | female poets | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | Richard Murphy | John Montague | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | round table discussion | poetry discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis | literary analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) ES.SP.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology

Description

Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This free course, Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology, introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area. First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This free course, Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology, introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area. First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Geology | Geology | ecology | ecology | Star Trek | Star Trek | fieldwork | fieldwork | data | data | Joseph Butler | Joseph Butler | stoics | stoics | sea levels | sea levels | pollution | pollution | calculations | calculations | SXR103_1 | SXR103_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT) ES.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few. This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | passing | race | race | gender | gender | class | class | literacy | literacy | American literature | American literature | queer | queer | genderqueer | genderqueer | transgender | transgender | Nella Larsen | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | Michel Foucault | sexuality | sexuality | Judith Butler | Judith Butler | transsexual | transsexual | William Craft | William Craft | Ellen Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | modernism | post-modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.625 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials, and Applications (MIT) 2.625 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials, and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce students to the principles, performance, and challenges of electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices. This will be done in the context of global energy needs and challenges, and will include an overview of different energy technologies. This course will introduce students to the principles, performance, and challenges of electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices. This will be done in the context of global energy needs and challenges, and will include an overview of different energy technologies.

Subjects

electrochemistry | electrochemistry | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | energy | energy | electrodes | electrodes | solid oxide fuel cell | solid oxide fuel cell | lithium ion battery | lithium ion battery | proton exchange membrane | proton exchange membrane | electrical double layer | electrical double layer | chemical equilibrium | chemical equilibrium | chemical potential | chemical potential | catalysis | catalysis | Butler-Volmer model | Butler-Volmer model | electrochemical impedance spectroscopy | electrochemical impedance spectroscopy | kinetics | kinetics | surface reactivity | surface reactivity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Religion | Science | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | History | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | development | God theory of evolution | science | theological explanation | universe | creatures | faith | and theology | purpose of evolution | Design | models | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT)

Description

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subjects

novel | literature | America | American | strangers | maps | timeline | genealogy | literary analysis | fiction | Moby-Dick | Melville | Jacobs | Twain | Wharton | Faulkner | Morrison | Butler

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Religion | Science | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | History | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | development | God theory of evolution | science | theological explanation | universe | creatures | faith | and theology | purpose of evolution | Design | models | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology

Description

Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This free course

Subjects

Geology | SXR103_1 | Skills for study: Critical and analytical | ecology | Star Trek | fieldwork | data | Joseph Butler | stoics | pollution | calculations

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | poetry | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | 17.007 | 24.237 | feminism | feminist | sex | gender | oppression | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | social construction | liberal | subjection | female | politics | pornography | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | domestic violence | prejudice | queer theory | masculinity | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | artificial | intelligence | feedback | mechanism | speculative | thought | intelligent | agency | systems | design | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | history | conscious | selection | chance | unconscious | philosophy | human | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | self-guiding | self-sustaining | nature | unintelligent | mechanical | argument | evolution | creation | creationism | ethics | ethical | values | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | model | existence | objects | designer | purpose | literary texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | intellectual history | life | planet | natural history | material universe | theory of natural selection | argument from design | organisms | human design | conscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | artificial | intelligence | feedback | mechanism | speculative | thought | intelligent | agency | systems | design | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | history | conscious | selection | chance | unconscious | philosophy | human | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | self-guiding | self-sustaining | nature | unintelligent | mechanical | argument | evolution | creation | creationism | ethics | ethical | values | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | model | existence | objects | designer | purpose | literary texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | intellectual history | life | planet | natural history | material universe | theory of natural selection | argument from design | organisms | human design | conscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Practising science: Reading the rocks and ecology

Description

Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This free course

Subjects

Geology | ecology | Star Trek | fieldwork | data | Joseph Butler | stoics | sea levels | pollution | calculations | SXR103_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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s Claim

Description

Video of lecture by Jill Fellows for the “Remake/Remodel” theme

Subjects

Jill Fellows | lecture | Remake/Remodel | video | Antigone | Butler | gender | Hegel | Lacan | norms | philosophy | sex

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/ca/deed.en_US

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ES.269 Passing: Flexibility in Race and Gender (MIT)

Description

This course is primarily a literature seminar. We will use American literature as a lens through which to examine different passing tropes. It will provide an introduction to queer, gender, and critical race theories for science and math majors. We will read such works as Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom, Incognegro, and Focault's A History of Sexuality, to name just a few.

Subjects

passing | race | gender | class | literacy | American literature | queer | genderqueer | transgender | Nella Larsen | Michel Foucault | sexuality | Judith Butler | transsexual | William Craft | Ellen Craft | modernism | post-modernism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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