Searching for Church : 58 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2

Why study a Book of Common Prayer? : with Dr Frances Knight in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study a Book of Common Prayer? : with Dr Frances Knight in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Frances Knight, an expert in history of Anglicanism, shows how a single book from the early nineteenth century – a copy of the Book of Common Prayer – can be the key to understanding the religious culture of a period. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr. Frances Knight, an expert in history of Anglicanism, shows how a single book from the early nineteenth century – a copy of the Book of Common Prayer – can be the key to understanding the religious culture of a period.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Church | Church | History | History | Religion | Religion | Anglicans | Anglicans | Catholics | Catholics | Gunpowder | Gunpowder | Plot | Plot

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Why study the Didache? Why study the Didache?

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Professor Thomas O’Loughlin argues that a single, short, first-century Christian text, known as the Didache (‘the training’) can provide a valuable window into the lives of the earliest Christian communities and enhance our reading of their better known writings such as the gospels. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Professor Thomas O’Loughlin argues that a single, short, first-century Christian text, known as the Didache (‘the training’) can provide a valuable window into the lives of the earliest Christian communities and enhance our reading of their better known writings such as the gospels.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Church | Church | History | History | Christianity | Christianity | Belief | Belief | Eucharist | Eucharist | Gospels | Gospels | Community | Community | ukoer | ukoer

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Company (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Company (MIT)

Description

Taking as its starting point the works of one of Britain's most respected, prolific—and funny—living dramatists, this seminar will explore a wide range of knowledge in fields such as math, philosophy, politics, history and art. The careful reading and discussion of plays by (Sir) Tom Stoppard and some of his most compelling contemporaries (including Caryl Churchill, Anna Deveare Smith and Howard Barker) will allow us to time-travel and explore other cultures, and to think about the medium of drama as well as one writer's work in depth. Some seminar participants will report on earlier plays that influenced these writers, others will research everything from Lord Byron's poetry to the bridges of Konigsberg, from Dadaism to Charter 77. Employing a variety of critical approaches Taking as its starting point the works of one of Britain's most respected, prolific—and funny—living dramatists, this seminar will explore a wide range of knowledge in fields such as math, philosophy, politics, history and art. The careful reading and discussion of plays by (Sir) Tom Stoppard and some of his most compelling contemporaries (including Caryl Churchill, Anna Deveare Smith and Howard Barker) will allow us to time-travel and explore other cultures, and to think about the medium of drama as well as one writer's work in depth. Some seminar participants will report on earlier plays that influenced these writers, others will research everything from Lord Byron's poetry to the bridges of Konigsberg, from Dadaism to Charter 77. Employing a variety of critical approaches

Subjects

contemporary literature | contemporary literature | drama | drama | stoppard | stoppard | churchill | churchill | play | play | british | british | text analysis | text analysis | stagecraft | stagecraft | writer | writer | history | history | politics | politics | culture | culture | performance | performance | comedy | comedy | Tom Stoppard | Tom Stoppard | Caryl Churchill | Caryl Churchill | Anna Deveare Smith | Anna Deveare Smith | Howard Barker | Howard Barker | dramatist | dramatist

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Geometría Gráfica Informática en Arquitectura II Geometría Gráfica Informática en Arquitectura II

Description

La asignatura trata de la profundización en el estudio geométrico con medios informáticos del hecho arquitectónico, considerado globalmente desde su complejidad espacial, compositiva, constructiva y estructural. La asignatura trata de la profundización en el estudio geométrico con medios informáticos del hecho arquitectónico, considerado globalmente desde su complejidad espacial, compositiva, constructiva y estructural.

Subjects

Bóveda | Bóveda | Patio de los Reyes | Patio de los Reyes | Expresión Gráfica en la Ingeniería | Expresión Gráfica en la Ingeniería | Módulo | Módulo | 3D network | 3D network | Andrea Palladio | Andrea Palladio | Modelado | Modelado | Extrusión | Extrusión | Construcciones Arquitectónicas | Construcciones Arquitectónicas | Dome | Dome | Tracery | Tracery | Rothwell – Northamptonshire | Rothwell – Northamptonshire | Los Manantiales | Los Manantiales | Dibujo | Dibujo | Paraboloid | Paraboloid | Graphic | Graphic | Solid | Solid | Dibujo 3D | Dibujo 3D | Arquitecto | Arquitecto | Architect | Architect | Hiperboloides | Hiperboloides | geodesic dome | geodesic dome | Render | Render | Malla | Malla | Computing | Computing | Catedral de León | Catedral de León | Surface | Surface | Historia del Arte | Historia del Arte | Red 3D | Red 3D | Gráfica | Gráfica | Geométrico | Geométrico | Spatial | Spatial | Red | Red | 3D | 3D | Form | Form | Hiperbólicos | Hiperbólicos | Ordenador | Ordenador | Ismael Garcia Rios | Ismael Garcia Rios | Booleana | Booleana | Paraboloides | Paraboloides | Axonometría | Axonometría | Revolve | Revolve | NURBS | NURBS | Félix Candela | Félix Candela | Rascacielos | Rascacielos | Expresión Gráfica Arquitectónica | Expresión Gráfica Arquitectónica | Architecture | Architecture | Minerva Médica | Minerva Médica | Bars | Bars | Barajas | Barajas | Computer | Computer | Skycraper | Skycraper | Superficie cuádrica | Superficie cuádrica | Arquitectura | Arquitectura | Autocad | Autocad | San Vicente de Coyoacán | San Vicente de Coyoacán | Rhinoceros | Rhinoceros | El Escorial | El Escorial | MicroStation | MicroStation | Composición Arquitectónica | Composición Arquitectónica | Modelling | Modelling | quadric surface | quadric surface | Mesh | Mesh | joints | joints | Superficie | Superficie | Nudos | Nudos | Proyectos Arquitectónicos | Proyectos Arquitectónicos | Parabólicos | Parabólicos | Geometry | Geometry | Estructura parabólica | Estructura parabólica | Carmen Garcia Reig | Carmen Garcia Reig | Ventana Gótica | Ventana Gótica | Expression | Expression | Tunnel vault | Tunnel vault | Red espacial | Red espacial | Geometría | Geometría | Sólido | Sólido | Perspectiva | Perspectiva | Church | Church | Cathedral | Cathedral | Minerva Medica Temple | Minerva Medica Temple | Hyperbolic | Hyperbolic | Bóveda de arista | Bóveda de arista | Revolución | Revolución | Cúpula | Cúpula | Estructura | Estructura | Expresión | Expresión | Computer aided design | Computer aided design | Informática | Informática | Rose window | Rose window | Geometric | Geometric | CAD | CAD | Formas | Formas | Infografía | Infografía | Kenilworth Castle | Kenilworth Castle | Plane | Plane | Architectural | Architectural | Barras | Barras | Plano | Plano | Structure | Structure | Architectural drawing | Architectural drawing | Arquitectónica | Arquitectónica | T4 | T4 | Cúpula geodésica | Cúpula geodésica | Ribbed vault | Ribbed vault | Tracería | Tracería | Vault | Vault | Module | Module | Extrude | Extrude | Rosetón | Rosetón | Boolean | Boolean | Hyperboloid | Hyperboloid | Hypar | Hypar

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

Site sourced from

http://ocw.upm.es/rss_all

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.242 Logic II (MIT) 24.242 Logic II (MIT)

Description

This course begins with an introduction to the theory of computability, then proceeds to a detailed study of its most illustrious result: Kurt Gödel's theorem that, for any system of true arithmetical statements we might propose as an axiomatic basis for proving truths of arithmetic, there will be some arithmetical statements that we can recognize as true even though they don't follow from the system of axioms. In my opinion, which is widely shared, this is the most important single result in the entire history of logic, important not only on its own right but for the many applications of the technique by which it's proved. We'll discuss some of these applications, among them: Church's theorem that there is no algorithm for deciding when a formula is valid in the predicate calculus; This course begins with an introduction to the theory of computability, then proceeds to a detailed study of its most illustrious result: Kurt Gödel's theorem that, for any system of true arithmetical statements we might propose as an axiomatic basis for proving truths of arithmetic, there will be some arithmetical statements that we can recognize as true even though they don't follow from the system of axioms. In my opinion, which is widely shared, this is the most important single result in the entire history of logic, important not only on its own right but for the many applications of the technique by which it's proved. We'll discuss some of these applications, among them: Church's theorem that there is no algorithm for deciding when a formula is valid in the predicate calculus;

Subjects

Logic | Logic | theory of computability | theory of computability | Kurt G?del | Kurt G?del | theorem | theorem | system | system | true | true | arithmetical | arithmetical | statements | statements | axiomatic basis | axiomatic basis | proving | proving | truths of arithmetic | truths of arithmetic | history applications | history applications | technique | technique | Church?s theorem | Church?s theorem | algorithm | algorithm | formula | formula | valid | valid | predicate calculus | predicate calculus | Tarski?s theorem | Tarski?s theorem | G?del?s second incompleteness theorem. | G?del?s second incompleteness theorem.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT) 21L.486 20th Century Drama (MIT)

Description

In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society In this course we will sample the range of mainstream and experimental drama that has been composed during the past century. Half of these plays are now acknowledged to be influential "classics" of modern drama; the other half are prize-winning contemporary plays that have broken new ground. We will study them both as distinguished writing and as scripts for performance. Moreover, all of these plays are historical: some draw their subject matter from past centuries, while others convey a sense of how contemporary events are informed by and located within a larger historical frame. During the first century of film, television, and computers, it seems that writers for the theater have been especially attuned to the relationships between past and present, in their art and in society

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | O'Neill | O'Neill | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Friel | Friel | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT) 21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia. This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | modern plays | Shaw | Shaw | Pirandello | Pirandello | Beckett | Beckett | Brecht | Brecht | Williams | Williams | Soyinka | Soyinka | Hwang | Hwang | Churchill | Churchill | Wilson | Wilson | Frayn | Frayn | Stoppard | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Deveare Smith | Kushner | Kushner | performance | performance | sociopolitical | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | aesthetic contexts | theater | theater | multimedia | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT)

Description

What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Contemporary literature | Drama | Drama | Stoppard | Stoppard | Churchill | Churchill | Play | Play | British | British | Text analysis | Text analysis | Stagecraft | Stagecraft | Writer | Writer | History | History | Politics | Politics | Culture | Culture | Performance | Performance | Comedy | Comedy | 21M.616 | 21M.616

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT) 6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course introduces basic mathematical models of computation and the finite representation of infinite objects. Topics covered include: finite automata and regular languages, context-free languages, Turing machines, partial recursive functions, Church's Thesis, undecidability, reducibility and completeness, time complexity and NP-completeness, probabilistic computation, and interactive proof systems. This course introduces basic mathematical models of computation and the finite representation of infinite objects. Topics covered include: finite automata and regular languages, context-free languages, Turing machines, partial recursive functions, Church's Thesis, undecidability, reducibility and completeness, time complexity and NP-completeness, probabilistic computation, and interactive proof systems.

Subjects

automata | automata | computability | computability | complexity | complexity | mathematical models | mathematical models | computation | computation | finite representation | finite representation | infinite objects | infinite objects | finite automata | finite automata | regular languages | regular languages | context-free languages | context-free languages | Turing machines | Turing machines | partial recursive functions | partial recursive functions | Church's Thesis | Church's Thesis | undecidability | undecidability | reducibility | reducibility | completeness | completeness | time complexity | time complexity | NP-completeness | NP-completeness | probabilistic computation | probabilistic computation | interactive proof systems | interactive proof systems | 6.045 | 6.045 | 18.400 | 18.400

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.640J The New Spain:1977-Present (MIT) 21L.640J The New Spain:1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people. In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Spanish Civil War | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Pedro Almodóvar | Pedro Almodóvar | educational reform | educational reform | feminism | feminism | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | television | television | fiction | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | Juan Carlos | constitution | constitution | reform | reform | revolution | revolution | democratic transition | democratic transition | José Ibáñez Martín | José Ibáñez Martín

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT) 21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people. In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Spanish Civil War | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Pedro Almodóvar | Pedro Almodóvar | educational reform | educational reform | feminism | feminism | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | television | television | fiction | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | Juan Carlos | constitution | constitution | reform | reform | revolution | revolution | democratic transition | democratic transition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Sacred calendars : Pentecost Sacred calendars : Pentecost

Description

Prof. Thomas O’Loughlin, an expert on early Christianity, discusses the origins of the annual feast of Pentecost (often called ‘Whit’). This is the feast which comes 50 days after Easter and is celebrated with a variety of meanings, but all of which are connected with the belief that the Holy Spirit is present in the Church. Prof. Thomas O’Loughlin, an expert on early Christianity, discusses the origins of the annual feast of Pentecost (often called ‘Whit’). This is the feast which comes 50 days after Easter and is celebrated with a variety of meanings, but all of which are connected with the belief that the Holy Spirit is present in the Church.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | calendar | calendar | feast | feast | Easter | Easter | Whit | Whit | Holy | Holy | Spirit | Spirit | Luke | Luke | Church | Church | Pentecostal | Pentecostal

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

University Sermon for the Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin Mary

Description

Sermon for Lady Day which includes relections on 'The virgin of the goldfinches' which hangs in the Saint Dyfrig Chapel of Llandaff Cathedral. Delivered in Oriel College Chapel on 4th March 2012 by The Most Revd Barry Morgan. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anglican | lady day | Church | chapel | sermon | annunciation | anglican | lady day | Church | chapel | sermon | annunciation

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129227/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Myth and Mystery: Faith, otherness and the limits of science

Description

Sermon on the limits of science, including reflections on Genesis 2.15-17; 3.1-7. Delivered in Oriel College Chapelon 26th February 2012 by Professor Tina Beattie (Director, Digby Stuart Research Centre for Catholic Studies, Roehampton University). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anglican | myth | sermon | Church | new atheism | chapel | anglican | myth | sermon | Church | new atheism | chapel

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129227/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT) 6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces basic mathematical models of computation and the finite representation of infinite objects. The course is slower paced than 6.840J/18.404J. Topics covered include: finite automata and regular languages, context-free languages, Turing machines, partial recursive functions, Church's Thesis, undecidability, reducibility and completeness, time complexity and NP-completeness, probabilistic computation, and interactive proof systems. This course is offered to undergraduates and introduces basic mathematical models of computation and the finite representation of infinite objects. The course is slower paced than 6.840J/18.404J. Topics covered include: finite automata and regular languages, context-free languages, Turing machines, partial recursive functions, Church's Thesis, undecidability, reducibility and completeness, time complexity and NP-completeness, probabilistic computation, and interactive proof systems.

Subjects

automata | automata | computability | computability | complexity | complexity | mathematical models | mathematical models | computation | computation | finite representation | finite representation | infinite objects | infinite objects | finite automata | finite automata | regular languages | regular languages | context-free languages | context-free languages | Turing machines | Turing machines | partial recursive functions | partial recursive functions | Church's Thesis | Church's Thesis | undecidability | undecidability | reducibility | reducibility | completeness | completeness | time complexity | time complexity | NP-completeness | NP-completeness | probabilistic computation | probabilistic computation | interactive proof systems | interactive proof systems | 6.045 | 6.045 | 18.400 | 18.400

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.045J Automata, Computability, and Complexity (MIT)

Description

This course introduces basic mathematical models of computation and the finite representation of infinite objects. Topics covered include: finite automata and regular languages, context-free languages, Turing machines, partial recursive functions, Church's Thesis, undecidability, reducibility and completeness, time complexity and NP-completeness, probabilistic computation, and interactive proof systems.

Subjects

automata | computability | complexity | mathematical models | computation | finite representation | infinite objects | finite automata | regular languages | context-free languages | Turing machines | partial recursive functions | Church's Thesis | undecidability | reducibility | completeness | time complexity | NP-completeness | probabilistic computation | interactive proof systems | 6.045 | 18.400

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Franco | censorship | regional autonomy | Basque | Catalonia | var | educational reform | feminism | magazines | newspapers | films | television | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | constitution | reform | revolution | democratic transition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Crete church

Description

Subjects

Uses and Functions\Religious\Church | Location\Europe | Environment\Climate\Mediterranean | Environment\Location and Site\Coastal | Materials and Resources\Rocks and Stone\Rubble | Structural Systems and Technologies\Structural Types\Mass wall | Structural Systems and Technologies\Roofs and Spans\Vault | Structural Systems and Technologies\Cladding and finishes\Whitewash | church | religious

License

 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.640J The New Spain:1977-Present (MIT)

Description

In this class we will come to understand the vast changes in Spanish life that have taken place since Franco's death in 1975. We will focus on the new freedom from censorship, the re-emergence of movements for regional autonomy, the new cinema, reforms in education and changes in daily life: Sex roles, work, and family that have occurred in the last decade. In so doing, we will examine myths that are often considered commonplaces when describing Spain and its people.

Subjects

modern Spain | Spanish Civil War | Franco | censorship | regional autonomy | Basque | Catalonia | var | educational reform | feminism | magazines | newspapers | films | television | fiction | Roman Catholic Church | Juan Carlos | constitution | reform | revolution | democratic transition | Ibez Martn

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Mission church Tesuque

Description

Subjects

Materials and Resources\Earths and Clays\Brick\Sun-dried brick: adobe | Uses and Functions\Religious\Church | Uses and Functions\Religious\Mission | Structural Systems and Technologies\Cladding and finishes\Render | Environment\Climate\Desert | Location\North America | Structural Systems and Technologies\Roofs and Spans\Flat roof | church | mission | pueblo | religious

License

 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Company (MIT)

Description

Taking as its starting point the works of one of Britain's most respected, prolific—and funny—living dramatists, this seminar will explore a wide range of knowledge in fields such as math, philosophy, politics, history and art. The careful reading and discussion of plays by (Sir) Tom Stoppard and some of his most compelling contemporaries (including Caryl Churchill, Anna Deveare Smith and Howard Barker) will allow us to time-travel and explore other cultures, and to think about the medium of drama as well as one writer's work in depth. Some seminar participants will report on earlier plays that influenced these writers, others will research everything from Lord Byron's poetry to the bridges of Konigsberg, from Dadaism to Charter 77. Employing a variety of critical approaches

Subjects

contemporary literature | drama | stoppard | churchill | play | british | text analysis | stagecraft | writer | history | politics | culture | performance | comedy | Tom Stoppard | Caryl Churchill | Anna Deveare Smith | Howard Barker | dramatist

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.486 Modern Drama (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes major modern plays featuring works by Shaw, Pirandello, Beckett, Brecht, Williams, Soyinka, Hwang, Churchill, Wilson, Frayn, Stoppard, Deveare Smith, and Kushner. The class particularly considers performance, sociopolitical and aesthetic contexts, and the role of theater in the world of modern multimedia.

Subjects

modern plays | Shaw | Pirandello | Beckett | Brecht | Williams | Soyinka | Hwang | Churchill | Wilson | Frayn | Stoppard | Deveare Smith | Kushner | performance | sociopolitical | aesthetic contexts | theater | multimedia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Taos mission church

Description

Subjects

Uses and Functions\Religious\Church | Uses and Functions\Religious\Mission | Location\North America | church | mission | religious

License

 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library Copyright belongs to Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill (MIT)

Description

What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do we need to know that is not information? If words circulate, can meaning be stable? What is the relationship between pleasure and responsibility? What are the politics of stagecraft in our time

Subjects

Contemporary literature | Drama | Stoppard | Churchill | Play | British | Text analysis | Stagecraft | Writer | History | Politics | Culture | Performance | Comedy | 21M.616

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata